Gaming board games



  • Continuing the discussion from Vote of No Confidence:

    @tar said:

    @Mikael_Svahnberg said:
    As a kid, my brother and I used to play Monopoly to the extent that we created hyper-inflation in it.

    You know what, balls to this discussion about what forum software should or shouldn't allow. I want to know more about 1930's-Germany-Monopoly.

    It's been so long so I barely remember, but I think it started by us ignoring the stop criterion and continued playing. At the end of the weekend we packed down the game and unpacked it next friday evening.

    Continue this for a while and you run out of houses and hotels. So you decide that an upside-down hotel is worth five normal hotels. (And pray that you don't end up on Mayfair or Pall Mall).

    Play only slightly longer and the bank runs out of money. Solution: start printing new money. Obviously there were too few zeros on the original currency, so you add a few more. Once these are not enough, you add even more, and pretty soon you don't care whether you land on Mayfair with its five upside-down-hotels, because that'll only cost you your smallest bill anyway.

    Also, at some point, my brother started his own bank and offered better rates than the official one.

    And that's about as much as I remember. Of course, it was only years later that I realised what we had done. I also suspect that if I open up the box for the game, it is ready to resume exactly where we left off thirty-odd years ago.



  • @Mikael_Svahnberg said:

    I think it started by us ignoring the stop criterion and continued playing

    What criterion? The "if someone can't pay bills, he's out" one?



  • @Gaska said:

    @Mikael_Svahnberg said:
    I think it started by us ignoring the stop criterion and continued playing

    What criterion? The "if someone can't pay bills, he's out" one?

    As I said; it's been a long time since I played so I simply buttumed that there must have been a stop criterion. Apparently we were matched well enough never to hit that criterion -- or my brother cheated/schemed to keep me in the game.



  • I played Monopoly a lot and when hotels finally come into play, it's very hard to keep the game going, since the only way to bring money into game is via loans and start bonus and prices for staying in hotel exceed those by a very large margin. Sooner or later (and rather later than sooner), someone will step on hotel thrice in a row and get rid of all his money.



  • I once played Monopoly with a group of friends and found out that it doesn't work very well if you share.

    We'd all negotiated deals like joint ownership of streets and rent-free deals in certain places and so on. Pretty much nobody was paying anyone anything.


  • SockDev

    @CarrieVS said:

    Pretty much nobody was paying anyone anything.

    I think you accidentally (re)invented Communism :stuck_out_tongue:



  • Pretty much. Who'd have thought that would break a game called Monopoly?


  • Notification Spam Recipient

    "I think it's wrong that only one company makes the game Monopoly." - Steven Wright


  • BINNED

    @CarrieVS said:

    Who'd have thought that would break a game called Monopoly?

    Apparently, it was originally conceived as a demonstration of why unchecked capitalism is bad, mmkay. Looks like you proved it's much nicer in a communist state



  • @Jaloopa said:

    Looks like you proved it's much nicer in a communist state

    Well it's nice at first, when you just go around, grabbing your $200 every time, buying stuff out and keeping wild capitalists in check. But then the bank's money starts to run out, people are sitting on piles of cash but can't buy anything, the prices get ridiculously inflated, the whole game's economy goes down, and all that happens from this point on is that the government takes income tax from you and redistributes it to other players when it's possible.

    So, yeah. Much nicer.



  • True.

    Over here in the US, we invented a better example. We call it "The US Telecommunications Industry."



  • @Maciejasjmj said:

    So, yeah. Much nicer.

    The only winning move is not to play. Seriously, I hate that game.



  • I'm not sure why this post when combined with the subject of Monopoly made me think of it... but am I the only one who has played the MAD Magazine board game?

    The goal is to lose all your money. It's... quirky to say the least.


  • BINNED

    I used to have a similar game called Go For Broke



  • @Mikael_Svahnberg said:

    Also, at some point, my brother started his own bank and offered better rates than the official one.

    if i ever play monopoly again i'm doing that.



  • Damn you @ben_lubar! "Go" used to be a perfectly normal word, until you nade me associate it with alien dwarf swarm fortress speaking lojban.



  • This topic reminds me of a question I've been meaning to ask for a while. Does anybody know of a good framework/engine/whatever for writing computerized versions of board games like Monopoly?

    I ran across one that was somebody's thesis. It has some nice features, but also some serious flaws. No actual programming is required to make a game; gameplay can be defined through a GUI (but you can write code if you need a feature not supported by the framework). The runtime is the dev env, so players can create their own rule variations, like hyper-inflationary or Communist Monopoly.

    Flaws include: It's Java. It looks like :hankey:. The runtime is the dev env — it's a little too configurable. You can take your Monopoly game and turn it into backgammon while you're playing.

    Anybody know something better?


  • SockDev

    @HardwareGeek said:

    You can take your Monopoly game and turn it into backgammon while you're playing.

    sounds like an interesting meta game. :-P



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    backgammon

    Backgammon is the best board game.



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    You can take your Monopoly game and turn it into backgammon while you're playing.

    Sounds like fun, especially once BattleTech rules get written in!

    "You landed on Park Place, that'll be $1500 in rent."

    "My 100-ton Atlas fires its LRM-20 into your hotel. 13 of the missiles hit and your building is on fire. I use the Autocannon/20 to destroy your classic car parked out front, then fire the SRM-6 at the hotel's main entrance as all the staff and residents attempt to escape.

    "Your hotel has been reduced to a smouldering pile of ashes. I re-roll the dice to determine my next move. It's a 7. Income Tax. Just wait until the IRS sees what I have in store for them..."


  • BINNED

    I found out about this recently:

    Mind you, I didn't actually check the features so it may not be good enough for what you want.



  • @accalia said:

    @HardwareGeek said:
    You can take your Monopoly game and turn it into backgammon while you're playing.

    sounds like an interesting meta game. :-P

    So, basically, Mornington Crescent: The Board Game.



  • @mott555 said:

    "My 100-ton Atlas fires its LRM-20 into your hotel. 13 of the missiles hit and your building is on fire.

    Ah but LRM's have a minimum arming range, if you're on the hotel square your missiles will just bounce off without exploding.

    @mott555 said:

    I use the Autocannon/20 to destroy your classic car parked out front, then fire the SRM-6 at the hotel's main entrance as all the staff and residents attempt to escape.

    That all works though.



  • @Onyx said:

    I found out about this recently:

    Mind you, I didn't actually check the features so it may not be good enough for what you want.

    I have Tabletop Simulator. It implements none of the rules of a game, only the logistics of actually playing one (table, board, pieces, shuffling cards, rolling dice, (private) hands, areas in front of each player for cards other players can see, etc...)

    All its workshop entries are boards/cards/pieces necessary to play the game in question.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Ah but LRM's have a minimum arming range, if you're on the hotel square your missiles will just bounce off without exploding.

    They have reduced accuracy at close range, I'm not aware of any minimum range. Btw I'm talking about the tabletop game not MWO in case that matters.



  • @mott555 said:

    They have reduced accuracy at close range,

    It looks like that's true of Clan LRMs, but not Inner Sphere LRMs. http://www.sarna.net/wiki/LRM-20

    @mott555 said:

    Btw I'm talking about the tabletop game not MWO in case that matters.

    Feh. Why would you play a boring-ass board game version of giant robots shooting missiles at each other?

    I used to drive a missile-only Catapult with LRM-15s and SRM-6s and if you could keep the enemy in the "sweet spot" of 180-270m (above the minimum arming range of LRMs, but below the max range of SRMs), you did SO MUCH DPS it was scary. Fun mech to drive.



  • @Onyx said:

    I found out about this recently:

    Mind you, I didn't actually check the features so it may not be good enough for what you want.

    Not exactly what I had in mind, but it looks interesting. From a quick perusal of their wiki and the first few tutorials, it looks like it can do most anything I might reasonably want, although I'd have to start getting into the stuff on creating games to be sure. (Most of what I've looked at so far is about playing and hosting existing games.) If anything, it's probably more than I need. I don't need (and didn't think I wanted) physics or 3D, but if the framework provides it, why not?

    TBH, though, I'm almost as interested in writing a framework as I am in making an actual game. I've made a couple of attempts, but abandoned them before I got very far; it's a lot of work, and life and stuff tends to get in the way.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @HardwareGeek said:

    It's Java. It looks like :hankey:.

    You can't make a silk purse from a sow's ear.



  • I thought about combining those into a single item. I did juxtapose them to imply that one follows from the other.


  • area_deu


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @blakeyrat said:

    Ah but LRM's have a minimum arming range, if you're on the hotel square your missiles will just bounce off without exploding.

    Pedantic, but not dickweedy. Darn. Would've been funny to see you get that badge.



  • Chess is basically a solved problem. There's no point for people playing it any more, just get a robot to do it. To date, nobody's actually been able to create a computerized solution to backgammon which can beat a human expert.

    Point being, backgammon is a far more interesting game than chess.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Mikael_Svahnberg said:

    Damn you @ben_lubar! "Go" used to be a perfectly normal word, until you nade me associate it with alien dwarf swarm fortress speaking lojban.

    One of my coworkers managed to mention Go, Dwarf Fortress and Lojban within an hour today. I'm starting to suspect that @ben_lubar has a multiple personality disorder.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @tar said:

    To date, nobody's actually been ableever been bored enough to create a computerized solution to backgammon which can beat a human expert.

    FTFY



  • @powerlord said:

    I'm not sure why this post when combined with the subject of Monopoly made me think of it... but am I the only one who has played the MAD Magazine board game?

    The goal is to lose all your money. It's... quirky to say the least.

    I loved that game as a kid. All of the crazy stuff you had to do, like walk around the table backwards with the card on your head, is great for kids.

    I should try to find it online or something.



  • I have no idea how backgammon works, but as far as I'm aware computerized solutions for Go (the board game, not golang) are some of the hardest problems to solve computationally speaking.

    How does backgammon work? I assume that, if it's anything like Go, it requires far more contextual "big picture" analysis that can't be reduced to a finite number of steps, unlike chess.



  • Tabletop simulator is coming out of early access and it looks pretty fucking cool. I don't know if it has a rules engine though, I'm assuming it doesn't since it "supports" an absurd number of games.


  • area_deu

    @dstopia said:

    How does backgammon work?

    It has dice. Thus randomness. In other words, a completely different thing than Chess and Go.



  • @asdf said:

    @tar said:
    To date, nobody's ever been boredBOARD enough to create a computerized solution to backgammon which can beat a human expert.

    Too busy enjoying a game of backgammon?



  • @aliceif said:

    @dstopia said:
    How does backgammon work?

    It has dice. Thus randomness. In other words, a completely different thing than Chess and Go.

    Eh, not quite. A game tree is a game tree.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @tar said:

    Too busy enjoying a game of backgammon?

    Nope, I only play chess.


  • BINNED

    While I have nothing against the classics, I see no discussion of newer games. Does nobody play them?

    I have a friend who's into all that stuff and tends to Kickstart a lot of board game projects. So I played stuff like Arkham (Chtulhu one, not Batman one), Dogs of war, Power grid, Ground floor and Progress. Though some of those are pushing it on the "board" front.

    I'd be happy to throw out some opinions on those if anyone is interested, but I don't see anyone even mentioning something like that. Not as popular, I guess?


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    I play board games infrequently, but when I do, it's usually newer stuff. We've been running a Risk Legacy game on and off for a few months now whenever a particular out-of-town friend can drop by.


  • SockDev

    @Yamikuronue said:

    Risk Legacy game

    anyone managed to get the continent of australia yet?

    if so prepared for a years long game.


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    You're familiar with Risk Legacy, right? It's designed to be a years long game XD It's basically for Risk what the OP did for Monopoly: continuing developments to the board over a series of Risk games.


  • SockDev

    All this talk of Risk has reminded me of Diplomacy; only played it once, and was wiped out fairly quickly, but it's good fun. Plus, it's easy to run a game over the Internet or by post :smile:


  • SockDev

    @Yamikuronue said:

    You're familiar with Risk Legacy, right?

    aye, i prefer the updated map that links hawaii and eastern australia though. completely breaks the turtle in australia gambit and makes the game more dynamic.

    sure it still takes forever to complete but you don't run into a sutuation where someone's got 5k troops on indonesia making them all but impossible to budge until anoterh player has swept the entire rest of the board and can afford the war of attrition it takes to budge that army..


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    eh? I can't find anything about a second edition of RL O.o That would help significantly, though right now the one guy who plays Risk the most is wiping the board with the rest of us XD


  • SockDev

    that map isn't a RL map. it's one of the Risk proper maps. I'm trying to find it, but basically all that differs in the map is that america links to australia so australia has two fronts.

    some other countries move around to better balance the board too.

    i'm trying to find that edition on amazon but unhelpfully most of the offerings don't give me pictures of the board.


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    Our usual winner likes to start in South America, which leads to endgames like:

    (That was the end of game 2, right after he won.)

    My husband likes to start in Australia. I've been getting better at starting in Europe, leaving either Africa or Asia for our fourth.


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