Eclipse docked windows always on top



  • So I'm stuck using Eclipse.

    One thing that drives me crazy is the fact that if I grab a source-file tab and drag it out to dock it on my other monitor, it is an "always on top" window with no way to change it!

    Bug was reported and closed as WONTFIX in 2006. It has since been reopened and remains reopened since 2013.

    How do you screw up basic window handling?



  • I just tried it and it doesn't look always on top to me. Windows 8.1, Eclipse Kepler.



  • Version: Kepler Service Release 2
    Build id: 20140224-0627

    This is on Linux, and the resulting window doesn't have "keep above others," but then, I'm also not multi-monitor (well, I am, but eclipse is inside a vm stretched across mutiple monitors, so it looks like a single monitor to eclipse).



  • Same here.
    Eclipse Luna, Windows 7.

    I didn't know it was even possible to undock the windows like that in Eclipse.



  • OK, let me clarify... it's not "always on top"... it's "always on top if the original window has focus".

    Try this:

    • Undock a source tab into it's own window. You now have two separate windows.
    • Bring a web browser window in front of the new window.
    • Click on the originating window
    • the new window pops up above the browser window


  • @JoeCool said:

    How do you screw up basic window handling?

    By stupidly choosing to reimplement all of it.


  • kills Dumbledore

    @JoeCool said:

    it's "always on top if the original window has focus".

    Pretty sure Visual Studio does this too.

    In fact, yes it dooes. Just tested in VS2013



  • Oh, you mean the child window follows its parent as far as Z indexing (gaining focus / coming to the front). Yes, I get that, too.


  • kills Dumbledore

    Seems like a sensible way to do it. The alternatives would be a taskbar entry for each child window or having to basically minimise every other window if you lose a child and want to find it again



  • Yes it does and I don't like that it does that either.
    That being said, at least visually, they still show the window itself in a dockable-style. You can easily see that it is a dockable window. With Eclipse, it is styled as if it is an actual separate window (like when you drag a tab out of Chrome or FF).

    One "workaround" I have seen people suggest is to use Window->New.
    This opens a new problem with the new window. If you close your main window before the new window, next time you open your workspace you've lost all of your window preferences (it uses the 'preferences' of the new window you had created).


  • SockDev

    if you're on windows and can install programs to your computer install autohotkey.

    then run this autohotkey script

    alwaysontop.ahk

    ^!SPACE::  Winset, Alwaysontop, , A
    

    when run press CTRLALTSPACE and always on top will be toggled for the focused window.

    that little key combo has saved my bacon more times than i can count.

    EDIT: if on linux hotkeying is built in. but i don't know the command to toggle active X window always on top.... ther eis one, i know that.



  • My work computer only has 12GB of memory, so not enough to run Eclipse. :smirk:


  • SockDev

    @chubertdev said:

    My work computer only has 12GB of memory, so not enough to run Eclipse.

    my home computer has 32 and barely can run eclipse.



  • SQL Developer's currently battling Eclipse for the "Who takes the most memory" award.



  • Thanks. While it doesn't fix Eclipse, it at least lets me toggle another window to "always be on top" temporarily until I'm done with it.



  • I have a 4GB 32bits CoreDuo and Eclipse works quite well with the necessary plugins (Maven, Git, Web stuff) so I can say that you're Doing It Wrong™

    First, have eclipse installations for different stuff (web, java, mobile, C++) and only the plugins you need. Disable spelling and other stuff.


  • SockDev

    huh. that trick doesn't work on eclipse?....

    daaang

    well at least you can get a window to appear over it.


  • SockDev

    @Eldelshell said:

    Doing It Wrong™

    including not actually having it installed.

    whihc would be a bit of a hurdle. ;-)

    'twas a joke my friend.



  • Eclipse as any Java application gets as much memory as you allow it for the JVM.

    Sometimes I feel like talking to all n00bs around here.


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @JoeCool said:

    Try this:- Undock a source tab into it's own window. You now have two separate windows.- Bring a web browser window in front of the new window.- Click on the originating window- the new window pops up above the browser window

    Uhmmm, that seems like the right way to do it to me. Just move that window to someplace unobtrusive within the webpage you are currently using.

    Edit: Discourse might be 50% whitespace just for that. ;)



  • Well, you forgot the "it's a joke" tag then.



  • Yes - it wasn't even using that much, but as we were going for "Eclipse uses lots of memory LOL" jokes.....


  • SockDev

    we have one of those?

    i thought it got rejected from HTML5 spec?



  • @accalia said:

    i thought it got rejected from HTML5 spec?

    I thought discourse wasn't bright enough to tag posts.


  • SockDev

    that too.



  • There's the tagger plugin, but it doesn't work very well which is presumably why we have it turned off.



  • Yes, and that's a 3rd party thing, anyways, AFAIK.



  • Ah - from the quality of it, I assumed it was a 'core plugin' or whatever the Discoterm is.



  • Where is it not unobtrusive? I want the ability to flip back and forth between two windows. It should just act like a normal fucking window (which visually, it indicates itself as such).

    Why is it so hard to to fix this that it has been an issue for 8 years?


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @JoeCool said:

    How do you screw up basic window handling?

    Use Java!



  • @JoeCool said:

    Try this:- Undock a source tab into it's own window. You now have two separate windows.- Bring a web browser window in front of the new window.- Click on the originating window- the new window pops up above the browser window

    doesn't visual studio do exactly this too?

    edit: someone else already said this. I look like a fool now. so I will hide it in innuendo. PENIS



  • @loopback0 said:

    I assumed it was a 'core plugin'

    No, that was a wishlist item.



  • @riking said:

    No, that was a wishlist item.

    Did they not wish for it to work better?



  • This post is deleted!

  • kills Dumbledore

    Performance problems are all because of Chrome on Android. Even when seen in IE on WinPhone



  • This true, but on their defense, it has to be hard as hell to develop and test for every single window environment Swing or JavaFX supports. When I use a Java GUI application, I usually do it with that mindset and forget about those edge cases.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Eldelshell said:

    forget about those edge cases.

    That's a valid way to work, but then you don't really get to complain about them. :smile:

    Personally I prefer my UIs to look like they system they're on, not like a generic library, if you know what I mean. I don't have too much trouble remembering the idioms of X vs Windows, for example.



  • @FrostCat said:

    Personally I prefer my UIs to look like they system they're on

    And Eclipse is trying to do that with SWT, and WxWidgets and QT. But each fails with those edge cases.



  • @Eldelshell said:

    And Eclipse is trying to do that with SWT, and Xwidgets and QT

    I thought they used GTK. In my eclipse.ini I see:

    plugins/org.eclipse.equinox.launcher.gtk.linux.x86_64_1.1.200.v20140116-2212

    Is there a QT version out there now?



  • Not sure, but that's not what I meant. What I meant is that SWT, WxWidgets and QT all try to reproduce the native L&F of the OS and fail at it some way or another.



  • Ah, that makes more sense. I think the "with" confused me. It sounded like Eclipse was doing that by using those things, not doing it "along with" or "like" or something similar.



  • @Eldelshell said:

    Xwidgets

    Think you meant wxWidgets.


  • Fake News

    @Eldelshell said:

    Not sure, but that's not what I meant. What I meant is that SWT, WxWidgets and QT all try to reproduce the native L&F of the OS and fail at it some way or another.

    I think you really meant wxWidgets:

    Because project names are case-sensitive, dammit!



  • When I used Eclipse it worked fine on a D420 which only had 2GB of ram and a 1.2ghz processor. Still wish I never sold that laptop.

    VS and other IDEs have similar weird "I will hog you ram or CPU". Also VS2010 only really worked well on Vista and better because of the way WPF worked (or so it seemed).



  • @loopback0 said:

    SQL Developer's currently battling Eclipse for the "Who takes the most memory" award.

    I have Eclipse, SoapUI and one or two Tomcat development servers running. They're all Java and they're all pretty big. I just checked and right now Eclipse is winning but it's usually Firefox by a large margin browsing TDWTF. So nobody gets to complain on Discourse about how much memory Eclipse uses.

    Besides, memory is cheap cheap cheap on desktops.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @lucas said:

    When I used Eclipse it worked fine on a D420 which only had 2GB of ram and a 1.2ghz processor. Still wish I never sold that laptop.

    It depends very much on what plugins you're using. The core Java ones are pretty good, the ones for XML and Spring and web services less so, and the Javascript authoring plugins are written by misanthropes. (Or at least that's what it feels like when you accidentally open a minified script and the parsing regexp from hell gets run over a megabyte of single line. Yeah, some of my colleagues write a lot of JS…)



  • This post is deleted!

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