Intel releases the X299 lineup



  • Going all the way from a 4c/4t i5 (!) to a 18c/36t i9 (!!). Suddenly, CPUs got a whole lot more interesting!

    So, at the low end we got a 4c/4t i5 and a 4c/8t i7, which are slightly speed bumped versions of their Kaby Lake counterparts at 4 and 4.3GHz respectively, coming with 16 PCIe lanes.

    After that there's the 6 and 8 core i7s with 28PCIe lanes, at 3.5 and 3.6GHz respectively.

    And above that the new i9 lineup, with 44PCIe lanes comi ng with 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18-core versions.

    And the prices are lower! 8-core for $600! The i9s are from $1000-$2000, though.


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @Atazhaia
    I'm just glad they finally gave the X-series a more distinct naming convention. It was always kind of silly to see the top-end CPUs branded as "Core i7-5###X" when the Core i7-6### line was released a few months prior.



  • Some day I'll understand what all these numbers mean. But it is not this day.


  • SockDev

    I are surprised. they didn't give more PCIe lanes to the low-end kaby lake X chips. what with NVMe drives having 4 extra lanes would be super helpful in a lot of builds.


  • SockDev

    @accalia They need some way of encouraging people to buy the more expensive chips :P


  • SockDev

    @RaceProUK and the core count isn't enough?

    in order to plug all my kit in and have it functional i have to upgrade to a chip with last gen's IPC count (skylakex fersus kabylake (though to be fair there wasn't a huge jump here this time) and a slower clock speed?!

    shame. shame on you intel.


  • SockDev

    @accalia It could be said you have too much kit :shopping_cart:



  • @RaceProUK said in Intel releases the X299 lineup:

    too much kit

    something about foxes


  • SockDev

    @hungrier said in Intel releases the X299 lineup:

    @RaceProUK said in Intel releases the X299 lineup:

    too much kit

    something about foxes

    PRETTY PRETTY

    0_1496152020047_2b88b268-a15b-4694-80ea-a7537633f938-image.png

    SHINY SHINY


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @accalia
    Eh, the Kaby-X's are only dual channel RAM anyway. It's not like the X-series has ever been current fab process -- if this lets Intel reduce the time from mainstream to X in a fab process by giving them a way to make some money off of the beta process of the conversion, I'm all for it.

    If they're just slapping some lipstick and a different socket connector on the i7-7700Ks that tested really good, then yeah, that's a bit of a dilution of the X-series brand. And judging by the rest of the specs for the i5-7640X and i7-7740X, they look a LOT like re-socketed i7-7700Ks... :/


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @anonymous234 said in Intel releases the X299 lineup:

    Some day I'll understand what all these numbers mean. But it is not this day.

    I am 99% sure this confusion is intentional.


  • kills Dumbledore

    @anonymous234 said in Intel releases the X299 lineup:

    Some day I'll understand what all these numbers mean. But it is not this day.

    Still not as bad as graphics cards


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @anonymous234
    As far as technical detail, the processor numbers themselves don't mean anything. There's some general differentiation Intel uses:

    • Product lines (i9 > i7 > i5 > i3)
    • Generation (i7-7xxx is 7th generation, which is newer than i7-6xxx, which is newer than i7-5xxx)
    • The letter at the end of the processor number indicates what family of processors the unit is from (X = eXtreme, K = unlocked for overclocking, T = low power, U = ultra low power... looks like they've added a few more lately that I don't know precisely what they mean),
    • The rest of the numbers are only really useful for comparing within an identical product line, generation, and family (bigger is better, generally meaning the factory-shipped multiplier of the CPU is higher leading to a higher clock rate before Turbo Boost).


  • @izzion said in Intel releases the X299 lineup:

    bigger is better

    YEAH it is. :giggity:



  • @accalia NVMe drives runs off the chipset PCIe lanes iirc, not the CPU PCIe lanes, and I only listed the CPU ones. Chipset lists support for up to 3 PCIe x4 storage devices from what it looks like, with 30 lanes in total I think.


  • SockDev

    @Atazhaia said in Intel releases the X299 lineup:

    @accalia NVMe drives runs off the chipset PCIe lanes iirc, not the CPU PCIe lanes, and I only listed the CPU ones. Chipset lists support for up to 3 PCIe x4 storage devices from what it looks like, with 30 lanes in total I think.

    CPU PCIe lanes are faster.

    so NYA!

    also i want to have more than just my graphics cards in my case.....



  • @accalia Ah, right. Want that extra speed from direct access. Yeah, I'm also a bit annoyed at the fact I have to jump up to 10-core if I want more than 28 lanes now, as 6 or 8 cores would be enough for my core needs, but for lanes it would be nice with more.


  • SockDev

    @Atazhaia said in Intel releases the X299 lineup:

    @accalia Ah, right. Want that extra speed from direct access. Yeah, I'm also a bit annoyed at the fact I have to jump up to 10-core if I want more than 28 lanes now, as 6 or 8 cores would be enough for my core needs, but for lanes it would be nice with more.

    Frist wrold porblems, amirite?

    ;-)


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