Even More DiscoMD5 Nonsense



  • Continuing the discussion from More Discoparser Tomfoolery:

    @abarker said:

    Where are the "arbitrary" MD5 strings?

    f3d6df7c9d60b1004b184e30c89d60b8

    Whenever you put back-ticks around text it takes an MD5 hash, for :disco:important‍:disco:technical‍:disco:reasons‍:doing_it_wrong:. You can then stick the MD5 hash anywhere in your post, and it will restore your original text (see raw above).

    5181eb6f30d4b3fa80e1832d5192e46a

    It is affected by whatever other formatting you use around the MD hash:
    5181eb6f30d4b3fa80e1832d5192e46astrong text

    I don't know if this is useful in any way to anyone; maybe you guys can figure something out.

    TL;DR: 42ed35ea3fa9b130b5b70679bd8ec408

    <!-- Of course you can put the back-ticked text inside HTML comments. `It's actually very easy to get the Discoparser to generate and do weird stuff with arbitrary MD5 strings.` `It appears to disable any <u>html</u>, [b]bbcode[/b], *markdown**emphasized text*, :eight_pointed_black_star:emoji, etc in the result, so I haven't been able to do anything fun with it. But you can use it to spam a bunch of text and potentially get around the character limit.` -->


  • @hungrier said:

    f3d6df7c9d60b1004b184e30c89d60b8

    Whenever you put back-ticks around text it takes an MD5 hash, for :disco:important‍:disco:technical‍:disco:reasons‍:doing_it_wrong:. You can then stick the MD5 hash anywhere in your post, and it will restore your original text (see raw above).

    That's awesome.

    @hungrier said:

    It appears to disable any <u>html</u>, [b]bbcode[/b], *markdown*emphasized text, :eight_pointed_black_star:emoji, etc in the result

    Naturally... the backticks cause that all to be escaped, so the replaced text probably already contains the escaping. Although, the MD5 hash must be calculated prior to escaping it.

    Does it work with double backticks, I wonder?

    test

    098f6bcd4621d373cade4e832627b4f6

    Yep!

    How about triple backticks?

    test
    ing
    

    04f647d5b863a2307b380888c1202f9f

    yes! (if you include an \n character in the MD5)



  • test

    098f6bcd4621d373cade4e832627b4f6
    098f6bcd4621d373cade4e832627b4f6



  • @rc4 said:

    c45a76afa15e17771dd300b522a8e5aa

    Okay, I tried a bunch of different MD5 hashes (variations on <br> and different whitespace/lack thereof where the newlines are) and none of them worked. I give up. It has newline characters in it, and I don't think you're supposed to use single backticks for multiline quotes.

    Here, if you take out the newlines, it'll work:

    <!-- `In the late summer of that year we lived in a house in a village that looked across the river and the plain to the mountains. In the bed of the river there were pebbles and boulders, dry and white in the sun, and the water was clear and swiftly moving and blue in the channels. Troops went by the house and down the road and the dust they raised powdered the leaves of the trees. The trunks of the trees too were dusty and the leaves fell early that year and we saw the troops marching along the road and the dust rising and leaves, stirred by the breeze, falling and the soldiers marching and afterward the road bare and white except for the leaves. The plain was rich with crops; there were many orchards of fruit trees and beyond the plain the mountains were brown and bare. There was fighting in the mountains and at night we could see the flashes from the artillery. In the dark it was like summer lightning, but the nights were cool and there was not the feeling of a storm coming. Sometimes in the dark we heard the troops marching under the window and guns going past pulled by motor-tractors. There was much traffic at night and many mules on the roads with boxes of ammunition on each side of their pack-saddles and gray motor trucks that carried men, and other trucks with loads covered with canvas that moved slower in the traffic. There were big guns too that passed in the day drawn by tractors, the long barrels of the guns covered with green branches and green leafy branches and vines laid over the tractors. To the north we could look across a valley and see a forest of chestnut trees and behind it another mountain on this side of the river. There was fighting for that mountain too, but it was not successful, and in the fall when the rains came the leaves all fell from the chestnut trees and the branches were bare and the trunks black with rain. The vineyards were thin and barebranched too and all the country wet and brown and dead with the autumn. There were mists over the river and clouds on the mountain and the trucks splashed mud on the road and the troops were muddy and wet in their capes; their rifles were wet and under their capes the two leather cartridge-boxes on the front of the belts, gray leather boxes heavy with the packs of clips of thin, long 6.5 mm. cartridges, bulged forward under the capes so that the men, passing on the road, marched as though they were six months gone with child. There were small gray motor cars that passed going very fast; usually there was an officer on the seat with the driver and more officers in the back seat. They splashed more mud than the camions even and if one of the officers in the back was very small and sitting between two generals, he himself so small that you could not see his face but only the top of his cap and his narrow back, and if the car went especially fast it was probably the King. He lived in Udine and came out in this way nearly every day to see how things were going, and things went very badly. At the start of the winter came the permanent rain and with the rain came the cholera. But it was checked and in the end only seven thousand died of it in the army` -->
    eab1c23d671fc9cbd98675439209b497

    Or you can wrap it in triple backticks, and that works if you include the newline characters in both the text and when you MD5 it:

    <!-- ``` In the late summer of that year we lived in a house in a village that looked across the river and the plain to the mountains. In the bed of the river there were pebbles and boulders, dry and white in the sun, and the water was clear and swiftly moving and blue in the channels. Troops went by the house and down the road and the dust they raised powdered the leaves of the trees. The trunks of the trees too were dusty and the leaves fell early that year and we saw the troops marching along the road and the dust rising and leaves, stirred by the breeze, falling and the soldiers marching and afterward the road bare and white except for the leaves. The plain was rich with crops; there were many orchards of fruit trees and beyond the plain the mountains were brown and bare. There was fighting in the mountains and at night we could see the flashes from the artillery. In the dark it was like summer lightning, but the nights were cool and there was not the feeling of a storm coming. Sometimes in the dark we heard the troops marching under the window and guns going past pulled by motor-tractors. There was much traffic at night and many mules on the roads with boxes of ammunition on each side of their pack-saddles and gray motor trucks that carried men, and other trucks with loads covered with canvas that moved slower in the traffic. There were big guns too that passed in the day drawn by tractors, the long barrels of the guns covered with green branches and green leafy branches and vines laid over the tractors. To the north we could look across a valley and see a forest of chestnut trees and behind it another mountain on this side of the river. There was fighting for that mountain too, but it was not successful, and in the fall when the rains came the leaves all fell from the chestnut trees and the branches were bare and the trunks black with rain. The vineyards were thin and barebranched too and all the country wet and brown and dead with the autumn. There were mists over the river and clouds on the mountain and the trucks splashed mud on the road and the troops were muddy and wet in their capes; their rifles were wet and under their capes the two leather cartridge-boxes on the front of the belts, gray leather boxes heavy with the packs of clips of thin, long 6.5 mm. cartridges, bulged forward under the capes so that the men, passing on the road, marched as though they were six months gone with child. There were small gray motor cars that passed going very fast; usually there was an officer on the seat with the driver and more officers in the back seat. They splashed more mud than the camions even and if one of the officers in the back was very small and sitting between two generals, he himself so small that you could not see his face but only the top of his cap and his narrow back, and if the car went especially fast it was probably the King. He lived in Udine and came out in this way nearly every day to see how things were going, and things went very badly. At the start of the winter came the permanent rain and with the rain came the cholera. But it was checked and in the end only seven thousand died of it in the army ``` -->
    c45a76afa15e17771dd300b522a8e5aa

    edit: fuck, that triple-backquoted text had your original MD5 hash and my post got whoa. Escaped yours to fix that.



  • I was wondering about what kind of silliness was throwing it off...thanks! :)



  • <!--Okay... testing to see how long the longest possible post I can make using this is... Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nunc molestie in dui sed consequat. Donec lectus dui, rhoncus ut sodales eget, finibus ut quam. Maecenas mattis diam sit amet ultrices dignissim. Proin condimentum nec leo at eleifend. Suspendisse aliquet nulla lobortis odio faucibus imperdiet. Donec rhoncus dui a consequat molestie. Donec varius diam urna, nec condimentum ex viverra sed. Fusce euismod sit amet nulla in molestie. Etiam ut hendrerit ligula, a rutrum magna. Etiam lorem urna, venenatis elementum hendrerit id, tempor id mi. Curabitur egestas urna in velit rutrum molestie eu et quam. Donec ac faucibus massa, ac consectetur ex. Nunc quis tellus dictum, placerat quam sit amet, lobortis enim. Vestibulum eget placerat tortor, sit amet accumsan turpis. Sed tellus turpis, scelerisque et enim fermentum, mattis porttitor arcu. Phasellus bibendum tempus aliquam. Ut cursus magna quam. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Nunc tempus ex in tellus mattis semper. Fusce rutrum, neque at lacinia mattis, nisl dolor accumsan purus, et mollis leo tellus et magna. Vestibulum tempus sem orci, elementum sagittis ex porta id. Aenean in hendrerit felis, vel vehicula velit. Suspendisse dapibus mi consequat ultrices congue. Quisque auctor quam nec urna rutrum tincidunt. Phasellus tristique, elit ut fermentum lacinia, tortor quam lobortis elit, posuere tempus augue ante ut ipsum. Etiam nec tristique purus. Sed dictum mauris et mattis placerat. Mauris ullamcorper accumsan tortor, luctus mattis purus rhoncus vel. Nunc vehicula magna nunc. Vivamus ac suscipit augue. Morbi a ex at nisi posuere porttitor vel eu ligula. Phasellus sodales sapien et nibh ultrices placerat. Praesent vulputate dolor vel dui lobortis pharetra. Etiam tincidunt ex eros, sit amet lacinia libero viverra non. Cras pellentesque a mi porta elementum. Phasellus suscipit mauris vitae leo tempus ultricies. Duis eu semper libero, vel porta massa. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed porttitor, odio ac pharetra egestas, eros dolor elementum dui, non hendrerit mi lorem eu magna. Cras rutrum blandit quam ut placerat. Fusce erat ante, tincidunt at nunc sit amet, tincidunt commodo mi. Phasellus luctus nisl ut vulputate mollis. Praesent hendrerit convallis posuere. Ut commodo arcu mauris, sed venenatis nisl dignissim id. Integer eu varius sem, at porta metus. Donec faucibus dui purus, nec facilisis tellus facilisis vel. Vivamus sit amet sagittis lacus. Curabitur id mauris rhoncus, pellentesque sapien in, convallis dui. Maecenas non leo mauris. Nulla faucibus facilisis nisl, eget accumsan dolor facilisis sed. Ut posuere sem eget quam dictum, a tempor eros euismod. Praesent egestas elit quis metus dapibus, non pharetra lectus rhoncus. Phasellus vel nulla fermentum, auctor diam vel, pharetra elit. Maecenas lobortis non purus eu posuere. Suspendisse pharetra bibendum nisi, at rhoncus ipsum consectetur et. Etiam bibendum est nec urna aliquam pretium. Aenean elementum magna ac sollicitudin interdum. Nulla molestie odio est, vitae feugiat orci ultrices consectetur. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Down the Rabbit-Hole Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without pictures or conversations?' So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her. There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, 'Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!' (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge. In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again. The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well. Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and book-shelves; here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; it was labelled 'ORANGE MARMALADE', but to her great disappointment it was empty: she did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing somebody, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it. 'Well!' thought Alice to herself, 'after such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down stairs! How brave they'll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn't say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!' (Which was very likely true.) Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end! 'I wonder how many miles I've fallen by this time?' she said aloud. 'I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think--' (for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) '--yes, that's about the right distance--but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to?' (Alice had no idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, but thought they were nice grand words to say.) Presently she began again. 'I wonder if I shall fall right through the earth! How funny it'll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downward! The Antipathies, I think--' (she was rather glad there was no one listening, this time, as it didn't sound at all the right word) '--but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know. Please, Ma'am, is this New Zealand or Australia?' (and she tried to curtsey as she spoke--fancy curtseying as you're falling through the air! Do you think you could manage it?) 'And what an ignorant little girl she'll think me for asking! No, it'll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere.' Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. 'Dinah'll miss me very much to-night, I should think!' (Dinah was the cat.) 'I hope they'll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah my dear! I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I'm afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that's very like a mouse, you know. But do cats eat bats, I wonder?' And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, 'Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?' and sometimes, 'Do bats eat cats?' for, you see, as she couldn't answer either question, it didn't much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and saying to her very earnestly, 'Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?' when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over. Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment: she looked up, but it was all dark overhead; before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, 'Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it's getting!' She was close behind it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was lit up by a row of lamps hanging from the roof. There were doors all round the hall, but they were all locked; and when Alice had been all the way down one side and up the other, trying every door, she walked sadly down the middle, wondering how she was ever to get out again. Suddenly she came upon a little three-legged table, all made of solid glass; there was nothing on it except a tiny golden key, and Alice's first thought was that it might belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it would not open any of them. However, on the second time round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches high: she tried the little golden key in the lock, and to her great delight it fitted! Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, not much larger than a rat-hole: she knelt down and looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever saw. How she longed to get out of that dark hall, and wander about among those beds of bright flowers and those cool fountains, but she could not even get her head through the doorway; 'and even if my head would go through,' thought poor Alice, 'it would be of very little use without my shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only knew how to begin.' For, you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible. There seemed to be no use in waiting by the little door, so she went back to the table, half hoping she might find another key on it, or at any rate a book of rules for shutting people up like telescopes: this time she found a little bottle on it, ('which certainly was not here before,' said Alice,) and round the neck of the bottle was a paper label, with the words 'DRINK ME' beautifully printed on it in large letters. It was all very well to say 'Drink me,' but the wise little Alice was not going to do that in a hurry. 'No, I'll look first,' she said, 'and see whether it's marked "poison" or not'; for she had read several nice little histories about children who had got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts and other unpleasant things, all because they would not remember the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker will burn you if you hold it too long; and that if you cut your finger very deeply with a knife, it usually bleeds; and she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle marked 'poison,' it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later. However, this bottle was not marked 'poison,' so Alice ventured to taste it, and finding it very nice, (it had, in fact, a sort of mixed flavour of cherry-tart, custard, pine-apple, roast turkey, toffee, and hot buttered toast,) she very soon finished it off. 'What a curious feeling!' said Alice; 'I must be shutting up like a telescope.' And so it was indeed: she was now only ten inches high, and her face brightened up at the thought that she was now the right size for going through the little door into that lovely garden. First, however, she waited for a few minutes to see if she was going to shrink any further: she felt a little nervous about this; 'for it might end, you know,' said Alice to herself, 'in my going out altogether, like a candle. I wonder what I should be like then?' And she tried to fancy what the flame of a candle is like after the candle is blown out, for she could not remember ever having seen such a thing. After a while, finding that nothing more happened, she decided on going into the garden at once; but, alas for poor Alice! when she got to the door, she found she had forgotten the little golden key, and when she went back to the table for it, she found she could not possibly reach it: she could see it quite plainly through the glass, and she tried her best to climb up one of the legs of the table, but it was too slippery; and when she had tired herself out with trying, the poor little thing sat down and cried. 'Come, there's no use in crying like that!' said Alice to herself, rather sharply; 'I advise you to leave off this minute!' She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes; and once she remembered trying to box her own ears for having cheated herself in a game of croquet she was playing against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pretending to be two people. 'But it's no use now,' thought poor Alice, 'to pretend to be two people! Why, there's hardly enough of me left to make one respectable person!' Soon her eye fell on a little glass box that was lying under the table: she opened it, and found in it a very small cake, on which the words 'EAT ME' were beautifully marked in currants. 'Well, I'll eat it,' said Alice, 'and if it makes me grow larger, I can reach the key; and if it makes me grow smaller, I can creep under the door; so either way I'll get into the garden, and I don't care which happens!' She ate a little bit, and said anxiously to herself, 'Which way? Which way?', holding her hand on the top of her head to feel which way it was growing, and she was quite surprised to find that she remained the same size: to be sure, this generally happens when one eats cake, but Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing but out-of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way. So she set to work, and very soon finished off the cake. The Pool of Tears 'Curiouser and curiouser!' cried Alice (she was so much surprised, that for the moment she quite forgot how to speak good English); 'now I'm opening out like the largest telescope that ever was! Good-bye, feet!' (for when she looked down at her feet, they seemed to be almost out of sight, they were getting so far off). 'Oh, my poor little feet, I wonder who will put on your shoes and stockings for you now, dears? I'm sure I shan't be able! I shall be a great deal too far off to trouble myself about you: you must manage the best way you can;--but I must be kind to them,' thought Alice, 'or perhaps they won't walk the way I want to go! Let me see: I'll give them a new pair of boots every Christmas.' And she went on planning to herself how she would manage it. 'They must go by the carrier,' she thought; 'and how funny it'll seem, sending presents to one's own feet! And how odd the directions will look! Alice's Right Foot, Esq. Hearthrug, near The Fender, (with Alice's love). Oh dear, what nonsense I'm talking!' Just then her head struck against the roof of the hall: in fact she was now more than nine feet high, and she at once took up the little golden key and hurried off to the garden door. Poor Alice! It was as much as she could do, lying down on one side, to look through into the garden with one eye; but to get through was more hopeless than ever: she sat down and began to cry again. 'You ought to be ashamed of yourself,' said Alice, 'a great gi-->26e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd1126e5391e354aefb5a1bbdb8ff440fd11rl like you,' (she might well say this), 'to go on crying in this way! Stop this moment, I tell you!' But she went on all the same, shedding gallons of tears, until there was a large pool all round her, about four inches deep and reaching half down the hall.


  • sockdevs

    answer: too long. didn't read.


  • area_deu

    Oh look, stuff from that one book.



  • Have you considered posting this on meta.d? They might appreciate aaaallll the text :smiling_imp:



  • Damn it, I tried to quote this whole thing but after a while it failed on:



  • Try it again. I think I've about reached the limit.



  • I wonder...

    5181eb6f30d4b3fa80e1832d5192e46a

    boo.




  • sockdevs

    TL;DR<a



  • <!-- `1.` `2.` `5.` `6.` `:doing_it_wrong:` -->

    1d41e6f55521cdba4fc73febd09d2eb4 This is just an ordinary list.
    3e35563210f995ee79a073fa882e1fd6 Nothing to see here.
    a85803f14639bef7f4539bad631d088c No backslashes required
    4363b12ae39947f045a4fb5fad740dc8 We were just 6f641d63321c2a1607b4a62e674000ff the whole time!



  • @Deadfast said:

    Damn it, I tried to quote this whole thing but after a while it failed on:

    Good for you, I can't even select text in here.

    So given the body length limit of 32000, what's the optimal amount of characters to put in the text? I think you'd need to maximize x + (((32000 - x)/16)*x) and it gives you 16008 characters in the text and the rest filled with MD5, for a total of 31,781,757 characters, give or take the backticks.



  • How about maximizing the actual HTML going over the wire?



  • This post is deleted!

  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @anotherusername said:

    .

    What did I just read?
    Also, attempting to select any text in that post results in... bad things on Chrome....



  • Selecting anything on this page causes bad things in Chrome...



  • @Maciejasjmj said:

    So given the body length limit of 32000, what's the optimal amount of characters to put in the text? I think you'd need to maximize x + (((32000 - x)/16)*x) and it gives you 16008 characters in the text and the rest filled with MD5, for a total of 31,781,757 characters, give or take the backticks.

    That was originally what I tried to do.

    I used <!--`...`--> as the basis for the MD5, so it had 9 characters of overhead. I calculated that the maximum was 15,991 characters of text repeated 500 times. Hex MD5 hashes are 32 characters, not 16; no space is needed between the MD5 hashes, so it is 32 characters for each repetition.

    Total characters in post: 15,991 + 9 + 500*32 = 32,000

    Total size after expanding: 500*15,991 = 7,995,500
    (The HTML comment isn't in the baked post at all)

    However, I ran into 500 and 502 errors trying to post it, until I eventually reduced it down more and more and the final baked size that would actually post was around 2.7 MB (triple click it to select the whole paragraph and paste it into Notepad++ to get the exact character count).

    edit: 2,734,548 characters.



  • The MD5 sum of Belgium is 6c1674d14bf5f95742f572cddb0641a7.

    :laughing: broken ass shit

    Look I can link to the MD5 sum of hungrier: @6eb7b159eebc9a4ff955f79ab579aa92

    Thanks to this we can finally link to @6c1674d14bf5f95742f572cddb0641a7!

    Edit: The user link to @6c1674d14bf5f95742f572cddb0641a7 shows up in preview but does not persist when posted :cry:



  • @Tsaukpaetra said:

    Also, attempting to select any text in that post :doing_it_wrong: DISCOURSE :doing_it_wrong: results in... bad things on Chrome....

    <attwood is a cunt



  • The MD5'd version of my username doesn't show up as a link in your message, but I did get a notification from it:



  • I wonder if I can mention <!--`LB_`--> @5bcc8b3b0b4e6ea55b2198c43e172dae?



  • How about if I manually put the <a class="mention"> around it? Then it should style as a mention... but will it actually generate the mention notification?

    <!-- `Polygeekery` --> @5da8867d34e2ad1cc2d57906bf0f43a6

  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    Nope, I still got the notification.

    Also, :wtf: did you choose me for your test? :stuck_out_tongue:



  • View the raw...


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    Ohhhhhhh, more DiscoFuckery with MD5.

    Carry on then.



  • And this is why InifinininiScroll is a terrible idea.


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @anotherusername said:

    I wonder if I can mention

    Huh. I bet it doesn't actually work, right?

    <!-- `LB_` --> @5BCC8B3B0B4E6EA55B2198C43E172DAE
    Edit: I must be doing it wrong. Maybe it's the upper-case?
    @5bcc8b3b0b4e6ea55b2198c43e172dae

    Filed under: Looks like it won't work in the preview, but...



  • @mott555 said:

    And this is why InifinininiScroll is a terrible idea.

    It'd be the same without infiniscroll too; the issue is End doesn't actually go to the end of the page, even though it should.



  • But how does this work? Why does it mention someone if you do an at-hash mention?



  • @RaceProUK said:

    @mott555 said:
    And this is why InifinininiScroll is a terrible idea.

    It'd be the same without infiniscroll too; the issue is End doesn't actually go to the end of the page, even though it should.

    The problem is I tried to grab the scrollbar thumb with my mouse and drag past that post but it almost killed me because Discourse makes the scrollbar retarded.



  • This post is deleted!


  • Clicking on the (fixed) mention at least brings up his user card. If only we could mention him to get his attention to ask him if it worked...



  • @AlexMedia said:

    But how does this work? Why does it mention someone if you do an at-hash mention?

    :disco:

    It's replacing the hash with the plain text, for whatever reason.

    @NedFodder said:

    Clicking on the (fixed) mention at least brings up his user card. If only we could mention him to get his attention to ask him if it worked...

    I figure if it works, the shock of receiving his very first ever mentions will bring him over here to check it out.


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @anotherusername said:

    I figure if it works, the shock of receiving his very first ever mentions will bring him over here to check it out.

    :dancers: Wouldn't that be awesome? The @??_ guys would be mentionable then!

    Edit: Does it really work though?

    <!-- `Tsaukpaetra` --> @eb19ba8342065325578be2fa11fa7175 @Tsaukpaetra

    Edit edit: How would I know if I mentioned myself? :facepalm:



  • Well, Polygeekery and hungrier have both said they got notifications from it...

    I don't think you get notifications if you @mention yourself.



  • <!-- [quote="Tsaukpaetra, post:38, topic:54353, full:true"] -->
    Oy, lets mention you then!

    <!-- `Tsaukpaetra` --> @eb19ba8342065325578be2fa11fa7175 <!-- SockBot/2.11.10 (Cheery Chiffon; owner:accalia; user:Zoidberg) 2016-02-03T17:37:05.784Z -->

  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    Nice!



  • @820e02fee102392d3291a49d318d592f - my theory is, it has to do with the way that Discourse handles the text inside 833344d5e1432da82ef02e1301477ce8, 833344d5e1432da82ef02e1301477ce8833344d5e1432da82ef02e1301477ce8, and 833344d5e1432da82ef02e1301477ce8833344d5e1432da82ef02e1301477ce8833344d5e1432da82ef02e1301477ce8 markdown. Sort of like this:

    It's calculating the MD5 hash of the contents.

    It's storing the contents elsewhere.

    It's replacing the contents with its MD5 hash.

    Then, it's probably doing a whole bunch of other stuff to the post, like finishing the parsing for emoji and markdown. This gets the emoji/markdown parsers to ignore whatever the contents was. The MD5 hash is just letters and numbers and it doesn't mean anything special to the emoji/markdown parsers.

    Then it's going back and replacing the MD5 hash (globally... probably with a regexp) with the original contents, but with special characters converted to their HTML entities where appropriate so that it's all interpreted as plain text when it gets to the browser.

    Then it's done.

    :disco:-tastic!

    <!-- `RaceProUK` ``` ` ``` -->


  • I wonder, does it do the final replace in parallel or sequentially? Could you do nested MD5 replaces?



  • @PleegWat said:

    parallel

    Does Ruby do anything in parallel? :passport_control:


  • area_deu

    <!--`*`--> 3389dae361af79b04c9c8e7057f60cc6 you mean this ... could work? 3389dae361af79b04c9c8e7057f60cc6


  • area_deu

    <!--`@`--> 518ed29525738cebdac49c49e60ea9d3aliceif


  • area_deu

    <!--`aliceif`--> @283cfab0224afcc55ddeb7094ebd1004


  • area_deu

    <!--`aliceif`--><!--`@`--> 518ed29525738cebdac49c49e60ea9d3283cfab0224afcc55ddeb7094ebd1004



  • <!--`aliceif`--><!-- `@`-->

    <!--`518ed29525738cebdac49c49e60ea9d3283cfab0224afcc55ddeb7094ebd1004`-->

    bf95b5944eea761f6196470803f311ac


  • area_deu

    Holy fuck, that worked.


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.