Now that's a honest employer!



  • Tonight, while enjoying a lovely night in the garden, I've spotted [url=http://trabajoensistemas.com.ar/oferta-laboral-Desarrollador-C--of24622.htm]this job offer[/url] at a local site:



    [url=http://tangopardo.com.ar/images/2012/screenshot_no_ofrecemos_nada.png][img]http://tangopardo.com.ar/images/2012/detalle_no_ofrecemos.png[/img][/url]






    The highlighted block translates roughly to:

      We DO NOT offer
    • Permanent training (something like, attending to courses / seminars / etc)
    • Career paths
    • Excellent hiring conditions
    • Excellent workplace / work conditions
    • (foreign, I hope) Language lessons

    If every one out there were so honest...



  •  Maybe they meant to communicate that they offer normal working conditions. :<br>



  • My Spanish is a bit spotty, but Lo ofrecemos is what they were after, I guess? Also, doesn't the first sentence translate as "Epidata Consulting is the first business specialised in toasting [as in 'cheers', not 'nice with jam'] services related to software architecture in Latin America...", or does "brindar" have another meaning?



  •  Google translates brindar as "to offer, present, tender or throw up".

    Let's hope it's not that last one.



  • Is the WTF the dark gray background that makes the text nearly unreadable?



  • @Ibix said:

    My Spanish is a bit spotty, but Lo ofrecemos is what they were after, I guess? Also, doesn't the first sentence translate as "Epidata Consulting is the first business specialised in toasting [as in 'cheers', not 'nice with jam'] services related to software architecture in Latin America...", or does "brindar" have another meaning?

    I think they would like to say "Le ofrecemos" but... probably they are just sincere and they don't offer all of that! hehehe

    And about the "brindar" word... It has two (maybe more but I can't think on them right now) meanings once you translate it to english based on the context. Brindar can mean "cheers" of "To offer"



  • Nos ofrecemos?

    Doesn't seem right, because as far as I know (not much) this translates as "we offer ourselves (as providers of some service)" rather than "we offer (the following)".



  • @Hatshepsut said:

    Nos ofrecemos?

    No. That's reflexive without a suitable preposition following.

    "Ofrecemos" is obviously what they were supposed to put. Whether "No ofrecemos" is a Freudian slip or simply a coffee underflow is impossible to tell.



  • @da Doctah said:

     Google translates brindar as "to offer, present, tender or throw up".

    Let's hope it's not that last one.

    Google translate tool as usual is TRWTF.



  • If they were offering those extras, they would say just Oferecemos. By placing a "no" there they are making it very explicit that you don't get any of those. It's the same difference as between "we offer" and "we don't offer" in Englih.


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