Take *that* you heathen!



  • Two teachers accused of sprinkling holy water onto an avowed atheist colleague have been removed from the classroom, and may be fired.

    The teacher who was allegedly sprinkled filed a complaint with the Broward County school district, which is investigating the incident as an act of bullying.

    Further reading


  •  And that is a curious perversion in information technology how?



  • @pbean said:

    And that is a curious perversion in information technology how?
    The atheist had an iPod



  •  

    On March 11, Rodriguez was in her
    classroom discussing her disbelief in God and the Bible with students
    when the alleged incident took place.
    Are you even allowed to [b]do[/b] that?  All of my old high school teachers would respond with the formulaic "We're not supposed to talk about that in the classroom" if a student asked the teacher what the tearcher's beliefs (religious, political, operating system) were during class.  Outside of class, nobody cared (officially, at least), but it was pretty forbidden for a teacher to express his/her opinions on those things while teaching a lesson and in a position of direct authority.



  • @North Bus said:

     

    On March 11, Rodriguez was in her
    classroom discussing her disbelief in God and the Bible with students
    when the alleged incident took place.
    Are you even allowed to do that?  All of my old high school teachers would respond with the formulaic "We're not supposed to talk about that in the classroom" if a student asked the teacher what the tearcher's beliefs (religious, political, operating system) were during class.  Outside of class, nobody cared (officially, at least), but it was pretty forbidden for a teacher to express his/her opinions on those things while teaching a lesson and in a position of direct authority.

     

    I'm sorry to say but that sounds so typical of the United States of Freedom. Over here we talk about our beliefs when we want and where we want and there are not many restrictions in place.



  • @DOA said:

    @pbean said:

    And that is a curious perversion in information technology how?
    The atheist had an iPod

    Makes sense; a lot of atheists are filthy hippies.



  • @pbean said:

    And that is a curious perversion in information technology how?
    Because more things make us ask WTF than just code



  • @bstorer said:

    Makes sense; a lot of atheists are filthy hippies.
    Hippies can afford iPods?



  • @Lingerance said:

    @bstorer said:
    Makes sense; a lot of atheists are filthy hippies.
    Hippies can afford iPods?
    Their parents can.



  • @Lingerance said:

    @bstorer said:
    Makes sense; a lot of atheists are filthy hippies.
    Hippies can afford iPods?

    Most hippies aren't terribly poor, and they certainly have money for
    frivolity, like drugs.  They also don't tend to own much outside of a bong and some phish CDs, so they don't have car payments, etc.  Sometimes they don't even have rent if they're just couch surfing.  If you're good at it, you can easily pull in a few hundred dollars a day by begging, so an iPod isn't out of the question.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @Lingerance said:

    @bstorer said:
    Makes sense; a lot of atheists are filthy hippies.
    Hippies can afford iPods?

    Most hippies aren't terribly poor, and they certainly have money for
    frivolity, like drugs.  They also don't tend to own much outside of a bong and some phish CDs, so they don't have car payments, etc.  Sometimes they don't even have rent if they're just couch surfing.  If you're good at it, you can easily pull in a few hundred dollars a day by begging, so an iPod isn't out of the question.

    Not to mention the question of priorities.  To a hippie, Apple products are more important than, say, utility bills or rent.



  • Those christians aren't very good at logic.

    One teacher talks in class about atheism, the religious teachers response was to spray holy water on her.
    The atheist teacher's reaction was to file a complaint.

    Now the religious teachers are confused why they got removed and not the atheist teacher.

    Pro-tip for them next time. Don't spray holy water, but file a complaint. 

    Also, while I am not familiar with the exact rules of talking about religion at schools in the US, unless talking about the absence of religion is banned there really would be no problem with explaining atheism. The equivalent of not carrying a knife at school, not collecting stamps or not stealing. 



  • @stratos said:

     

    Also, while I am not familiar with the exact rules of talking about religion at schools in the US, unless talking about the absence of religion is banned there really would be no problem with explaining atheism. The equivalent of not carrying a knife at school, not collecting stamps or not stealing. 

    I was with you up until this point.  Talking about atheism and talking about Christianity are the same thing.  Personally, I don't really know what to think.  On the one hand, people are too sensitive about shit like this.  Having a teacher talk about their religious beliefs is hardly going to traumatize the little bastards.  On the other hand, isn't there actual teaching to be done?  The public schools are churning out kids who can barely read, write, communicate or do remedial math, but apparently there's plenty of time to get into stupid debates with the class.  There's a time and a place for long, tedious and pointless philosophical debates; where every smug asshole can derail every class--regardless of subject matter--by expounding on their idiotic beliefs that nobody really gives a shit about; and that's college.  College-aged dipshits already think they are precious, unique little flowers and that everyone wants--nay, needs--to hear whatever half-formed theories they found floating in the bong water.  At least we can keep this pathetic, intellectually-weak self-love out of primary schools; your job there is to shut the fuck up and learn how to add, kids.



  •  @bstorer said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @Lingerance said:

    @bstorer said:
    Makes sense; a lot of atheists are filthy hippies.
    Hippies can afford iPods?

    Most hippies aren't terribly poor, and they certainly have money for
    frivolity, like drugs.  They also don't tend to own much outside of a bong and some phish CDs, so they don't have car payments, etc.  Sometimes they don't even have rent if they're just couch surfing.  If you're good at it, you can easily pull in a few hundred dollars a day by begging, so an iPod isn't out of the question.

    Not to mention the question of priorities.  To a hippie, Apple products are more important than, say, utility bills or rent.

     

    Ignorance.  You aren't a real hippie until the ineffable jam breeches the cosmic chasm and arcs directly into your skull; until the music is inside, always.  That's what the headbands are for... adjusting the acoustics.

     



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @stratos said:

     Also, while I am not familiar with the exact rules of talking about religion at schools in the US, unless talking about the absence of religion is banned there really would be no problem with explaining atheism. The equivalent of not carrying a knife at school, not collecting stamps or not stealing. 

    I was with you up until this point.  Talking about atheism and talking about Christianity are the same thing.  Personally, I don't really know what to think.  On the one hand, people are too sensitive about shit like this.  Having a teacher talk about their religious beliefs is hardly going to traumatize the little bastards.  On the other hand, isn't there actual teaching to be done?  The public schools are churning out kids who can barely read, write, communicate or do remedial math, but apparently there's plenty of time to get into stupid debates with the class.  There's a time and a place for long, tedious and pointless philosophical debates; where every smug asshole can derail every class--regardless of subject matter--by expounding on their idiotic beliefs that nobody really gives a shit about; and that's college.  College-aged dipshits already think they are precious, unique little flowers and that everyone wants--nay, needs--to hear whatever half-formed theories they found floating in the bong water.  At least we can keep this pathetic, intellectually-weak self-love out of primary schools; your job there is to shut the fuck up and learn how to add, kids.

     

    Not really the response I was expecting, but I pretty much put that in there because someone was bound to start foaming at the mouth when reading that.
    I also pretty much disagree with you. Schools aren't factories, focing children to remember stuff is useless, you have to get them to think. If you can get them so far as to think longer then 5 seconds about something, then maybe they will be able to actually figure shit out. Also I didn't read in the article what class it was, for all you know it was a class about civil liberties.



  • @stratos said:

    Also I didn't read in the article what class it was, for all you know it was a class about civil liberties.
    From the first link:
    According to sources close to the investigation who requested anonymity, the alleged incident involving the holy water at Blanche Ely arose from a boisterous discussion Rodriguez was having with her students about the Jan. 12 earthquake in Haiti.



    On at least one social networking website, Rodriguez described herself as an “Atheist” and “change agent.”



    In response to one student’s remark that the disaster in Haiti happened because of God’s wrath on the island nation over a pact its leaders made with Satan more than 200 years ago, Rodriguez reportedly began refuting Christianity.

    [...]

    In response to the lively discussion, Rainer and Robinson entered the room.



    “Sounds like somebody needs some holy water,” a student remarked before Robinson retrieved and displayed a small bottle of liquid from the doorway.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    [...] point. [...]
     

    Ahh, Morbius Rant™. Good times.

     



  • @PJH said:

    From the first link:
     

    You're ingoring the parts where students say that no sprinkling of water occurred at all (though it may have been asked of christian students only -- we don't know), and the article also states that R had lunch with R & R before filing the complain, though the article mentions nothing of the state of the discussion they were having. R described herself as a "change agent" which sounds a little odd to me, and gives a motive to paint her fellow teachers as crackpots.

    In other words, it's a RAH RAH article with nothing but He Said She Said "evidence", and I find it this topic void.

    Ugh.

     

     



  • @stratos said:

    Schools aren't factories, focing children to remember stuff is useless, you have to get them to think.  If you can get them so far as to think longer then 5 seconds about
    something, then maybe they will be able to actually figure shit out.

    Of course, but religious debate and arguments are hardly going to get people to think.   Besides, you're treading dangerously close to modern education theory, which is a complete failure.  You know, the whole "help their self-esteem" and "encourage debate" movement.  For one thing, memorizing facts may not be the biggest goal of education, but it's still better than the fuzzy-headed nonsense which currently drives schools; at least the kids come out knowing something.  And instilling critical reasoning and problem-solving skills doesn't come from stupid religious or philosophical debates.

     

    @stratos said:

    Also I didn't read in the article what class it was, for all you know it was a class about civil liberties.

    I'm not saying religion should have no mention in school.  Religion makes up a lot of history and understanding is useful.  I don't see why that would ever require the teacher to lecture on his own beliefs, though.  Any class where the teacher tried to provoke philosophical debate (even college classes) ended up the same way: students came away more entrenched in their own beliefs.  And they hadn't been taught critical thinking and factual historical analysis (which could then be turned inward and used to dissect their own beliefs) but instead simply learned that their opinions were equally valuable and that they were all unique little snowflakes.  They learned to talk and argue about what they believe long before they learned to actually think about it.



  • @dhromed said:

    In other words, it's a RAH RAH article with nothing but He Said She Said "evidence", and I find it this topic void.

    They should probably both be fired, but since teachers' unions have convinced the government that the purpose of public education is to provide jobs for teachers and not to actually educate children, that will never happen.


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