I just realized



  • One product at work has been around for a while. At times, I feel a bit lost within the whole thing. I think I just realized why...

     

    Lots of projects

     

     



  •  Ugh..! How long does that monster solution take to (re)compile? or even load up in visual studio?



  •  Opening up is about 6 minutes. Re-building from scratch is about the length of an Anime TV show episode. Thank Heavens for Netflix streaming!

     



  • Wow. 

    What the heck is "ThereMain"? And do we even want to know what "TestToonT..." actually is?



  • Mandatory xkcd reference: http://xkcd.com/303/



  • Yes, that one was quite popular around here :-)

     


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

     Only 6 minutes to open it?

    Around these parts, if you're not important enough to be local admin on your workstation, Visual Studio takes 6 minutes just to load ITSELF (because it has to do the entire "This is the first time you've used Visual Studio, let me create your settings!" dance... Which for some reason is a hell of a lot slower than normal)

     

    At any rate, 565 projects!?!?

    Please tell me they used namespaces properly. PLEASE!? 



  • @Astædus said:

    xkcd

    Now I can see why many people here find such references annoying. TRWTF is that you read that comic enough to instantly think of them. Let me guess:

    @Astædus's Thought Process at 22:47 20.12.2008 UTC said:

    Hmm... that would take a long time to load.
    It'd be a good excuse to do something while your IDE is busy with it.
    That's like the "My code is compiling" xkcd comic!
    Let's see... that's number 303.
    Now I'll post it on TDWTF so somebody will ridicule me for it.

    Correct?



  • @AltSysrq said:

    @Astædus said:

    xkcd

    Now I can see why many people here find such references annoying. TRWTF is that you read that comic enough to instantly think of them. Let me guess:

    @Astædus's Thought Process at 22:47 20.12.2008 UTC said:

    Hmm... that would take a long time to load.
    It'd be a good excuse to do something while your IDE is busy with it.
    That's like the "My code is compiling" xkcd comic!
    Let's see... that's number 303.
    Now I'll post it on TDWTF so somebody will ridicule me for it.

    Correct?

    I'm searching for a web comic that best suits your ability to read minds!  Oh man, people are going to laugh out loud (I'm also long forming my chat speak).



  • @AltSysrq said:

    Now I can see why many people here find such references annoying. TRWTF is that you read that comic enough to instantly think of them.

    People think my moratorium on xkcd references is a bit mean, but now you see why it is necessary.  I do it because I love you all. 



  • @Weng said:

    because it has to do the entire "This is the first time you've used Visual Studio, let me create your settings!" dance... Which for some reason is a hell of a lot slower than normal
    Back in my university days (i.e. last year) the lab PCs were configured (or not configured) such that opening VS for the first time would result in that process, every single session.  I quickly learned bringing in my laptop was far more productive.

     And relating to the OP, I thought that having 88 projects in a solution was a lot.  Fortunately the solution for my specific application only needs 52 (mostly but not all of those are in common).  I don't know if I could live without the 'Collapse Projects' plugin.

    (Note: the 88 project solution is aptly named 'Large Solution'.  We also have one called VS2008_Large Solution since we're sorta in a slow changeover process...)



  • Namespaces? Surely you jest! This code started out in 1998 on then fairly new Visual Studio 6.0. It only moved to 2003 early this year, and 2008 last month. Namespaces? Shhyeah...

    The physical dependencies aren't so bad, though, because all cross-library references go through pure abstract virtual base classes, so it's not all bad.

    Oh, and I do all my source control (p4) from the command line; I don't even install the p4 source code provider. According to co-workers, if I did, it would take longer to open up.

     



  • @Weng said:

    Around these parts, if you're not important enough to be local admin on your workstation, Visual Studio takes 6 minutes just to load ITSELF (because it has to do the entire "This is the first time you've used Visual Studio, let me create your settings!" dance... Which for some reason is a hell of a lot slower than normal)

    Bullshit. I don't know what kind of crap slows your god-forsaken machine down, but on my XP machine VS2008 loads in 5 seconds, with a simple project.



  • @alegr said:

    Bullshit. I don't know what kind of crap slows your god-forsaken machine down, but on my XP machine VS2008 loads in 5 seconds, with a simple project.

    <not_really>i use that line with the clients when they bitch how our apps are slow : "it works quite fast on my station... perhaps you should upgrade your computer" .... </not_really>



  •  6 minutes? Pah. I have to work on a site where the working folder is accessed on one machine in a different location over a slow VPN. And the sourcesafe repository is on another machine in yet another location, over another slow VPN.

     

    It takes me half an hour to load the stupid thing. I work around this by not closing the project, ever, unless forced to reboot my machine.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @AltSysrq said:

    Now I can see why many people here find such references annoying. TRWTF is that you read that comic enough to instantly think of them.

    People think my moratorium on xkcd references is a bit mean, but now you see why it is necessary.  I do it because I love you all. 

     

    Does the moratorium also extend to bash.org?   Those are less common, I know, but we might as well nip that one in the bud just in case...



  • @shadowman said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @AltSysrq said:

    Now I can see why many people here find such references annoying. TRWTF is that you read that comic enough to instantly think of them.

    People think my moratorium on xkcd references is a bit mean, but now you see why it is necessary.  I do it because I love you all. 

     

    Does the moratorium also extend to bash.org?   Those are less common, I know, but we might as well nip that one in the bud just in case... HAHAHA DISREGARD THAT, I SUCK COCKS

    Sorry, couldn't resist...

    In all seriousness, though, extend the moratorium to bash.org, "all your base", LOLcats, and any other stupid memes* that haven't been seen here as frequently. (Yet...) This is not /b/.

    *Memes created here are, of course, exempt.



  • @Fred Foobar said:

    [i]Checking whether build environment is sane... build environment is grinning and holding a spatula. Guess not.[/i]

    cough cough



  •  @Spectre said:

    @Fred Foobar said:
    Checking whether build environment is sane... build environment is grinning and holding a spatula. Guess not.

    cough cough

    Yes, yes, I know, the sheer irony of that statement... As soon as I clicked "post" and saw my sig, I thought, "woops!"

    Oh well, fixed now.



  • @Fred Foobar said:

    In all seriousness, though, extend the moratorium to bash.org, "all your base", LOLcats, and any other stupid memes* that haven't been seen here as frequently. (Yet...) This is not /b/.

    *Memes created here are, of course, exempt.

     

    You shoudl type them, print them out, put them on a wooden tabel, take a picture and upload that here just so you'll be sure we all knoiw.



  • @dtech said:

    @Fred Foobar said:

    In all seriousness, though, extend the moratorium to bash.org, "all your base", LOLcats, and any other stupid memes* that haven't been seen here as frequently. (Yet...) This is not /b/.

    *Memes created here are, of course, exempt.

     

    You shoudl type them, print them out, put them on a wooden tabel, take a picture and upload that here just so you'll be sure we all knoiw.

     

    BRILLANT_NOT_FOUND



  • @Fred Foobar said:

    In all seriousness, though, extend the moratorium to bash.org, "all your base", LOLcats, and any other stupid memes* that haven't been seen here as frequently. (Yet...) This is not /b/.

    *Memes created here are, of course, exempt.

     



  • @Fred Foobar said:

    @shadowman said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @AltSysrq said:

    Now I can see why many people here find such references annoying. TRWTF is that you read that comic enough to instantly think of them.

    People think my moratorium on xkcd references is a bit mean, but now you see why it is necessary.  I do it because I love you all. 

     

    Does the moratorium also extend to bash.org?   Those are less common, I know, but we might as well nip that one in the bud just in case... HAHAHA DISREGARD THAT, I SUCK COCKS

    Sorry, couldn't resist...

    In all seriousness, though, extend the moratorium to bash.org, "all your base", LOLcats, and any other stupid memes* that haven't been seen here as frequently. (Yet...) This is not /b/.

    *Memes created here are, of course, exempt.

    This was one of the things I didn't understand about the xkcd ban. MPS started enforcing it, and yet he himself started quoting/using 4chan memes, which sound even more stupid. However, xkcd did make all kinds of jokes on stuff vaguely related to programming, so it isn't really off-topic.



  • @alegr said:

    @Weng said:

    Around these parts, if you're not important enough to be local admin on your workstation, Visual Studio takes 6 minutes just to load ITSELF (because it has to do the entire "This is the first time you've used Visual Studio, let me create your settings!" dance... Which for some reason is a hell of a lot slower than normal)

    Bullshit. I don't know what kind of crap slows your god-forsaken machine down, but on my XP machine VS2008 loads in 5 seconds, with a simple project.

    I think he means that it will take 6 minutes when using a PC where the local user is forced to go through the entire freakin' setup process. This "feature" is also present with MS Office ... it happens when a user who has never logged on a specific PC does so and then opens up Word/Excel/Powerpoint. May God help you if you deleted the local install files!



  • @danixdefcon5 said:

    This was one of the things I didn't understand about the xkcd ban. MPS started enforcing it, and yet he himself started quoting/using 4chan memes, which sound even more stupid. However, xkcd did make all kinds of jokes on stuff vaguely related to programming, so it isn't really off-topic.

    I enacted the xkcd moratorium, not MPS.  It has nothing with xkcd being off-topic, but with it being shitty and unfunny.  Referencing xkcd only shows that you have an awful sense of humor and aren't clever enough to think up anything of your own.



  •  @morbiuswilters said:

    I enacted the xkcd moratorium, not MPS.  It has nothing with xkcd being off-topic, but with it being shitty and unfunny.  Referencing xkcd only shows that you have an awful sense of humor and aren't clever enough to think up anything of your own.

    I personally like XKCD a lot, and I think the "ban" was enacted due to overuse.



  • @danixdefcon5 said:

    I think he means that it will take 6 minutes when using a PC where the local user is forced to go through the entire freakin' setup process. This "feature" is also present with MS Office ... it happens when a user who has never logged on a specific PC does so and then opens up Word/Excel/Powerpoint. May God help you if you deleted the local install files!
     

    I think you're giving office to much credit. On my university it happens everytime you start office after a reboot/login.

    It might have something to do with the shitty ICT departement we have. Or maybe  it's the really annoying fact that everytime you login everything gets deleted, set up to default etc., except your my documents folder ofcourse. Which is ever more annoying since most of the default settings on nearly everything are retared (e.g. the compulsory java editor has by default no auto-indention or color-coding)



  • @dtech said:

    Or maybe  it's the really annoying fact that everytime you login everything
    gets deleted, set up to default etc., except your my documents folder ofcourse.

    Ha! Here everything gets deleted, [i]including[/i] the My Documents folder.

    Then again, there is a mysterious Z: drive that I don't have the courage to explore yet.



  •  @Spectre said:

    @dtech said:
    Or maybe  it's the really annoying fact that everytime you login everything
    gets deleted, set up to default etc., except your my documents folder ofcourse.

    Ha! Here everything gets deleted, including the My Documents folder.

    Then again, there is a mysterious Z: drive that I don't have the courage to explore yet.

    They do that for a good reason though.  They are trying to prevent plagiarism and theft of intellectual property.  If they didn't students could simply log in and find the work they need, already complete, and pass if off as their own.  Sure, they could actually use roaming profiles and your MyDocuments would travel with you, but with 50k + students doing this on thousands of computers it might just congest network traffic a bit.  They are probably expecting you to save your work on a USB drive or the Z: drive. 



  • @amischiefr said:

     @Spectre said:

    @dtech said:
    Or maybe  it's the really annoying fact that everytime you login everything
    gets deleted, set up to default etc., except your my documents folder ofcourse.

    Ha! Here everything gets deleted, including the My Documents folder.

    Then again, there is a mysterious Z: drive that I don't have the courage to explore yet.

    They do that for a good reason though.  They are trying to prevent plagiarism and theft of intellectual property.  If they didn't students could simply log in and find the work they need, already complete, and pass if off as their own.  Sure, they could actually use roaming profiles and your MyDocuments would travel with you, but with 50k + students doing this on thousands of computers it might just congest network traffic a bit.  They are probably expecting you to save your work on a USB drive or the Z: drive. 

    Unless they're using Windows9x, there's no need to wipe the PC's. A well-managed Windows box would have the MyDocuments folder set to "Owner- Full Rights, everyone else - None". Of course, I prefer the NIS/NFS config they used to have back in the RS/6000 days. Your homedir is stored at the NFS server, so you'll see the same files everywhere. I've yet to see this in Windows; that is, having your "homedir" (MyDocuments) in a non-local shared folder.


  • @danixdefcon5 said:

    Unless they're using Windows9x, there's no need to wipe the PC's. A well-managed Windows box would have the MyDocuments folder set to "Owner- Full Rights, everyone else - None". Of course, I prefer the NIS/NFS config they used to have back in the RS/6000 days. Your homedir is stored at the NFS server, so you'll see the same files everywhere. I've yet to see this in Windows; that is, having your "homedir" (MyDocuments) in a non-local shared folder.

     

    Are you talking about making MyDocuments a virtual link to a shared folder on a network drive or having your MyDocuments folder downloaded/uploaded every time you log in and out?  Because as I mentioned if everybody has to upload and download every time network traffic will take a significant hit.  Plus, at my college at least, you aren't very likely to get the same computer twice.  At least not in the same day/week, or when you need it.



  • @amischiefr said:

    @danixdefcon5 said:

    Unless they're using Windows9x, there's no need to wipe the PC's. A well-managed Windows box would have the MyDocuments folder set to "Owner- Full Rights, everyone else - None". Of course, I prefer the NIS/NFS config they used to have back in the RS/6000 days. Your homedir is stored at the NFS server, so you'll see the same files everywhere. I've yet to see this in Windows; that is, having your "homedir" (MyDocuments) in a non-local shared folder.

     

    Are you talking about making MyDocuments a virtual link to a shared folder on a network drive or having your MyDocuments folder downloaded/uploaded every time you log in and out?  Because as I mentioned if everybody has to upload and download every time network traffic will take a significant hit.  Plus, at my college at least, you aren't very likely to get the same computer twice.  At least not in the same day/week, or when you need it.

    That'll be making MyDocuments a virtual link to a shared folder on a network drive. It is the most efficient setting in a college environment; especially when there are 300 PC's and 10k students. When I was in college, getting the same computer twice was as likely to happen as finding a four-leaf clover.



  • @danixdefcon5 said:

    That'll be making MyDocuments a virtual link to a shared folder on a network drive. It is the most efficient setting in a college environment; especially when there are 300 PC's and 10k students. When I was in college, getting the same computer twice was as likely to happen as finding a four-leaf clover.
    That's how it should be done indeed. Though actually, not quite - the entire user profile should be a network drive, that way your configs persist as well. That's the situation on the general purpose computer system at my university. There are clusters all over, and you can login at any one, into WinXP or Linux on a PC, or OS X on a Mac.

    A lot of the departments do their own thing however (mainly due to specific software needs that wouldn't work with uni-wide licensing) . At mine, user profiles is local. You have to explictly 'Map Network Drive' to use the file server (or sftp from Linux). This is annoying because as I mentioned, configs don't persist.



  • @m0ffx said:

    @danixdefcon5 said:

    That'll be making MyDocuments a virtual link to a shared folder on a network drive. It is the most efficient setting in a college environment; especially when there are 300 PC's and 10k students. When I was in college, getting the same computer twice was as likely to happen as finding a four-leaf clover.
    That's how it should be done indeed. Though actually, not quite - the entire user profile should be a network drive, that way your configs persist as well. That's the situation on the general purpose computer system at my university. There are clusters all over, and you can login at any one, into WinXP or Linux on a PC, or OS X on a Mac.

    A lot of the departments do their own thing however (mainly due to specific software needs that wouldn't work with uni-wide licensing) . At mine, user profiles is local. You have to explictly 'Map Network Drive' to use the file server (or sftp from Linux). This is annoying because as I mentioned, configs don't persist.

    Ah, I sometimes forget that the actual "homedir" in Windows is actually c:\documents and settings(username). Can this be changed to a network drive? That should persist configs.

    This is also one of the reasons I prefer the NIS/NFS or LDAP/NFS routes, its much much easier to do the "global profile" this way. In fact, one of my former employers did exactly that, in a grand migration path from OS/2 to Linux.



  • @amischiefr said:

    They do that for a good reason though.  They are trying to prevent
    plagiarism and theft of intellectual property.  If they didn't students
    could simply log in and find the work they need, already complete, and pass if
    off as their own.  Sure, they could actually use roaming profiles and your
    MyDocuments would travel with you, but with 50k + students doing this on
    thousands of computers it might just congest network traffic a bit.  They
    are probably expecting you to save your work on a USB drive or the Z: drive.

    Heh, well I was sort of joking; the Z: drive is mapped to a per-user network share, and I think the "My Documents" special location is linked to there, as well. However if you create C:\Documents and Settings\I\My Documents, it mysteriously disappears after logoff, along with your settings.



  •  @amischiefr said:

    Are you talking about making MyDocuments a virtual link to a shared
    folder on a network drive or having your MyDocuments folder
    downloaded/uploaded every time you log in and out?  Because as I
    mentioned if everybody has to upload and download every time network
    traffic will take a significant hit.  Plus, at my college at least, you
    aren't very likely to get the same computer twice.  At least not in the
    same day/week, or when you need it.

    I went to a college where they actually did the latter (download and upload the entire profile every time you log in and out) for a few quarters... ever since I took that one digital video class, my profile took over 20 minutes to load, until they moved everyone to a saner profile system (network shares)! 8O

     Ah, fond memories of the 4th floor "IT Lab"... supposedly the right side of the lab with the faster PC's and Visual Studio was limited to IT students, while the left side was open to anyone, but in practice those pesky mechanical engineering students (or whoever the heck they were) wound up using the good PC's to play Bejeweled and Defend the Castle and other stupid web games... :P



  • @danixdefcon5 said:

    @m0ffx said:

    @danixdefcon5 said:

    That'll be making MyDocuments a virtual link to a shared folder on a network drive. It is the most efficient setting in a college environment; especially when there are 300 PC's and 10k students. When I was in college, getting the same computer twice was as likely to happen as finding a four-leaf clover.
    That's how it should be done indeed. Though actually, not quite - the entire user profile should be a network drive, that way your configs persist as well. That's the situation on the general purpose computer system at my university. There are clusters all over, and you can login at any one, into WinXP or Linux on a PC, or OS X on a Mac.

    A lot of the departments do their own thing however (mainly due to specific software needs that wouldn't work with uni-wide licensing) . At mine, user profiles is local. You have to explictly 'Map Network Drive' to use the file server (or sftp from Linux). This is annoying because as I mentioned, configs don't persist.

    Ah, I sometimes forget that the actual "homedir" in Windows is actually c:\documents and settings(username). Can this be changed to a network drive? That should persist configs.

    This is also one of the reasons I prefer the NIS/NFS or LDAP/NFS routes, its much much easier to do the "global profile" this way. In fact, one of my former employers did exactly that, in a grand migration path from OS/2 to Linux.

     

    We run roaming profiles, limited to something like 15mb to keep logon times down, with some folders (IE Temp folder etc) excluded, with the My Documents redirected to the users home folder on the file server.  Done through a combination of setting the properties on the user account in AD, and group policy to do the redirection of My Documents and prevent the user changing the shortcut's destination.  Sounds like this is what you're looking to achieve?

    Happy new year all, even if your Zune didn't see it in! 


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