Yet another clbuttic mistake prevents verizon subscription



  • Dr. Herman I. Libshitz tries to subscribe to a DSL service and ... guess what happens 😉

    http://www.philly.com/philly/hp/news_update/26089374.html

     One another WTF is that offshore helpdesk suggest him to misspell his name



  •  Libcrapz?  Is that the hip new library behind a Craps game?



  • Verizon wireless doesn't let you use any feature on your phone until they can find a way to make money in the process, Verizon branded routers only allow a few internal IP addresse even when the underlying hardware and software support more, and Verizon DSL tries to tell you that your name is a swear. Everything Ihear about that company seems to imply it's run by a bunch of greedy assholes.



  • @ailivac said:

    Everything Ihear about that company seems to imply it's run by a bunch of greedy assholes.
     

    So you have never actually dealt with them?



  • Language Filter Error

    A word already exists containing the word you are trying to filter. Please choose another word to be offended by, or try misspelling the word you wish to filter.



  •  I'm a Verizon customer and I'm pretty pleased with them in general.  Their cell phone coverage is good and their website is actually pretty usable. I agree with the point of them being greedy assholes, though.

    Now, I can understand why some services (like web forums, multiplayer games) would want to prohibit certain "offensive" usernames, but why the hell would Verizon want to do this?  The only people that can see your account information are a) yourself, b) Verizon employees.  Who are they trying to protect, their own customer service people?  I can't even begin to fathom how this requirement got into their software in the first place.



  • @Outlaw Programmer said:

    Now, I can understand why some services (like web forums, multiplayer games) would want to prohibit certain "offensive" usernames, but why the hell would Verizon want to do this?  The only people that can see your account information are a) yourself, b) Verizon employees.  Who are they trying to protect, their own customer service people?  I can't even begin to fathom how this requirement got into their software in the first place.

    Apparently you are unfamiliar with sexual harrassment and "hostile work environment" lawsuits. 



  • Honestly, the way I see it is that someone that works in any kind of customer service that can't deal with the occasional "offensive to them" material just plain simply does not belong in that job! I say offensive to them because just because one person deems something offensive does not mean the next person will too. So anyone that works in customer service in my opinion needs to be able to deal with that or just not be there. And if a person really does come across something they can't / won't deal with, pass it on to a co-worker who will for crying out loud and move on with your day...

    And as far as sexual harrasment goes, how does an "offensive" username sexually harass someone?



  • @Kermos said:

    Honestly, the way I see it is that someone that works in any kind of customer service that can't deal with the occasional "offensive to them" material just plain simply does not belong in that job! I say offensive to them because just because one person deems something offensive does not mean the next person will too. So anyone that works in customer service in my opinion needs to be able to deal with that or just not be there. And if a person really does come across something they can't / won't deal with, pass it on to a co-worker who will for crying out loud and move on with your day...

    And as far as sexual harrasment goes, how does an "offensive" username sexually harass someone?

    I didn't say it was my opinion, I said it was a matter of civil law and company policy.  I take it you don't have much experience in the corporate world if you've never had a boss tell you that you can't say "fuck" because a female colleague might be offended and sue the company. 



  • Oh I realize it wasn't your opinion, didn't mean to imply it was.

    Honestly, the companies I prefer to work for are generally smaller companies where the employees actually know each other and needs for such ridiculous policies don't exist. I mean, let me put it this way, the company I work for right now, one of the girls has a sign hanging near her desk that reads "Sexual harrasment will not be reported, it will however be graded." It's a joke of course but obviously in that kind of enviroment, problems such as someone getting offended over "fuck" doesn't exist.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    I take it you don't have much experience in the corporate world if you've never had a boss tell you that you can't say "fuck" because a female colleague might be offended and sue the company.
    I admit to not knowing about anything about this kind of thing, but I'd like you to explain to me how my saying "fuck" is grounds for an employee to sue my company (or link to something so that I can learn more about it on my own).

    Assuming I offend someone, isn't that my fault rather than my company's?

    How am I supposed to react to the horrible code I read every day, if not by saying "fuck"? (Note: I don't actually do this.)



  • @Welbog said:

    I admit to not knowing about anything about this kind of thing, but I'd like you to explain to me how my saying "fuck" is grounds for an employee to sue my company (or link to something so that I can learn more about it on my own).

    Assuming I offend someone, isn't that my fault rather than my company's?

    Legal precedent established in US civil law.  It may not apply to Canadia, I don't know.  The idea is that if the employer knows there is a problem (like a female employee feeling sexually harrassed by a male employee's use of the word "fuck") and does not take actions to rectify it (writing up the male employee or firing him) then they can be sued for allowing a hostile environment to exist.  In practice, it's extremely hard for a company to prove it did everything it could to resolve these types of issues so they tend to err on the side of extreme caution.  Not all companies are like this, obviously, but many larger corporate environments tend to be. 



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    The idea is that if the employer knows there is a problem (like a female employee feeling sexually harrassed by a male employee's use of the word "fuck") and does not take actions to rectify it (writing up the male employee or firing him) then they can be sued for allowing a hostile environment to exist.
    Maybe it's just the way you worded it, but this seems far too subjective to me. It seems like I, after having said fuck and been left unpunished, could also sue the company for the same reason.



  • @Welbog said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    The idea is that if the employer knows there is a problem (like a female employee feeling sexually harrassed by a male employee's use of the word "fuck") and does not take actions to rectify it (writing up the male employee or firing him) then they can be sued for allowing a hostile environment to exist.
    Maybe it's just the way you worded it, but this seems far too subjective to me. It seems like I, after having said fuck and been left unpunished, could also sue the company for the same reason.

    You could sue for any reason you want. Of course, winning is mostly based upon whether or not your attorney is sufficiently clever.



  • @Welbog said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    The idea is that if the employer knows there is a problem (like a female employee feeling sexually harrassed by a male employee's use of the word "fuck") and does not take actions to rectify it (writing up the male employee or firing him) then they can be sued for allowing a hostile environment to exist.
    Maybe it's just the way you worded it, but this seems far too subjective to me. It seems like I, after having said fuck and been left unpunished, could also sue the company for the same reason.

    You wouldn't be able to get a judgement for sexually harrassing yourself, no.  Obviously the harrassment must come from another employee and the employer must know about it and not take remedial action.  Once again, it's very difficult for an employer to prove that they did everything in their power to eliminate hostile situations which is why they tend to be extremely strict when it comes to enforcement. 


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