Cognitive Neuroscience Research Group (GRNC)



  • ... For the first time, a study done by the Cognitive Neuroscience Research Group (GRNC)...

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080711135447.htm



  • And your point is?

    News flash: the whole world is not English.

    English's word order patterns are, in fact, unusual. "Group for the Research of Neuroscience Cognitivique" represents the word order of most european languages.



  •  Here you go: the full name, may be even a link:

    GRNC, Grup de Recerca Neurociència Cognitiva

    It's Spanish. 

     Edit: I just tried saying that: Isn't spanish a pretty, smooth language? It just flows.

     



  •  if "Group for the Research of Neuroscience Cognitivique" is the actual name that has an acronym, why didn't they use the actual name instead of translating it....is that not the normal thing to do? i mean would you translate "Nation Rifle Association" to "Association de national" or some weird shit like that...when you were doing an article on it?



  • @RandomViewer said:

    i mean would you translate "Nation Rifle Association" to "Association de national" or some weird shit like that...when you were doing an article on it?

    Yes.
    It would make the organization's purpose more clear to non-English speakers, though it DOES seem a bit silly when the English word is 2 letters different from the foreign one. Still, many English speakers (especially speed-readers) would trip over "Neuroscience Cognitivique" more than "Cognitive Neuroscience."



  • @robbak said:

     Here you go: the full name, may be even a link:

    GRNC, Grup de Recerca Neurociència Cognitiva

    It's Spanish. 

     Edit: I just tried saying that: Isn't spanish a pretty, smooth language? It just flows.

     

     

    It's Catalan. In Spanish it would be: Grupo de Investigación Neurociencia Cognitiva. The difference is not much (from my distant point of view, Catalan looks like a dialect of standard Spanish with some French influences), but some Catalans care about it deeply.



  • @RandomViewer said:

    ... For the first time, a study done by the Cognitive Neuroscience Research Group (GRNC)...

    I suppose you don't know what OTAN is either, then?



  • And let's not forget about International Organization for Standardization (ISO), Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), and probably Web Ontology Language (OWL).



  • @RandomViewer said:

     if "Group for the Research of Neuroscience Cognitivique" is the actual name that has an acronym, why didn't they use the actual name instead of translating it....is that not the normal thing to do? i mean would you translate "Nation Rifle Association" to "Association de national" or some weird shit like that...when you were doing an article on it?

     

    Actually, translating it is the normal thing to do. The FIDE is always called the World Chess Federation in English, even though it's still called FIDE ("Fedaracion Internationale Du Esches" or something like that) when abbreviated, for example.



  • @robbak said:

     Edit: I just tried saying that: Isn't spanish a pretty, smooth language? It just flows.

     I've taken several years of Spanish classes, and no, it isn't.



  • @Spectre said:

    And let's not forget about International Organization for Standardization (ISO), Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), and probably Web Ontology Language (OWL).
    Actually, OWL isn't written that way because of language differences. This was a case of someone trying to be clever ("everone knows how to pronounce 'owl'", "owls represent wisdom", "hey, let's reference an old knowledge representation format from the 70's"). It'd be less obnoxious and bothersome if it were just a simple language issue.



  • @Cap'n Steve said:

    @robbak said:

    Edit: I just tried saying that: Isn't spanish a pretty, smooth language? It just flows.

     I've taken several years of Spanish classes, and no, it isn't.


    Years ago a Polish friend gave me some goo advice on learning a foreign language. He believed the best way to learn was when ""lying on a pillow". In other words in bed with someone who was a native speaker of the language in question (and of course also being someone you would want to go to bed with).

    Once you get the right motivation then the language learning becomes so much easier. And I can attest to the soundness of his advice!



  • @j6cubic said:

    Actually, OWL isn't written that way because of language differences. This was a
    case of someone trying to be clever ("everone knows how to pronounce 'owl'",
    "owls represent wisdom", "hey, let's reference an old knowledge representation
    format from the 70's"). It'd be less obnoxious and bothersome if it were just a
    simple language issue.

    Yea, I know. Interestingly enough, it just turned out I didn't know how to pronounce 'owl'.



  • @OzPeter said:

    Years ago a Polish friend gave me some goo advice on learning a foreign language. He believed the best way to learn was when ""lying on a pillow". In other words in bed with someone who was a native speaker of the language in question (and of course also being someone you would want to go to bed with).

    That's how I've learned Polish, too. :-))



  • @Spectre said:

    @j6cubic said:
    Actually, OWL isn't written that way because of language differences. This was a
    case of someone trying to be clever ("everone knows how to pronounce 'owl'",
    "owls represent wisdom", "hey, let's reference an old knowledge representation
    format from the 70's"). It'd be less obnoxious and bothersome if it were just a
    simple language issue.

    Yea, I know. Interestingly enough, it just turned out I didn't know how to pronounce 'owl'.

    Funnily, A german with no English would pronounce it something like "offal", which fits the quality of the acronym nicely.



  • @ammoQ said:

    That's how I've learned Polish, too. :-))

    I see your "Polish" and raise it with "Brazilian Portuguese" :D



  • @OzPeter said:

    @ammoQ said:
    That's how I've learned Polish, too. :-))

    I see your "Polish" and raise it with "Brazilian Portuguese" :D
    Sorry ozpeter, I gotta go with ammoq on this one.  For one, he's our Lord and Savior.  For two, Polish chicks are hot  (very, very NSFW).  Okay, that one's kinda average.  But brazillian chicks aren't hotter.



  • @belgariontheking said:

    Sorry ozpeter, I gotta go with ammoq on this one.  For one, he's our Lord and Savior.  For two, Polish chicks are hot  (very, very NSFW).  Okay, that one's kinda average.  But brazillian chicks aren't hotter.


    If you say so. But I hope you are saying this only after experiencing them first hand. I have product evaluation in Europe (but not Poland) and while the material is good, I much prefer the fruits of a country with almost 7500km of coastline and a climate that doesn't snow too much (yes you can actually get snow in Brazil) ;-)



  • @belgariontheking said:

    For two, Polish chicks are hot  (very, very NSFW).  Okay, that one's kinda average.
    The best part about that page is the pathetic attempt to censor the image.



  • @robbak said:

     Here you go: the full name, may be even a link:


    GRNC, Grup de Recerca Neurociència Cognitiva

    It's Spanish. 

     Edit: I just tried saying that: Isn't spanish a pretty, smooth language? It just flows.

     

    THAT IS NOT SPANISH.

    That must be one of those weird languages they talk in Spain, but definitely NOT Spanish.



  • @RandomViewer said:

     if "Group for the Research of Neuroscience Cognitivique" is the actual name that has an acronym, why didn't they use the actual name instead of translating it....is that not the normal thing to do?

    Nope. Usually they'll translate the name, but leave the acronym; so I get to read stuff like "Agencia de Seguridad Nacional (NSA, por sus siglas en inglés)" or something like that. Some are translated themselves, especially those that are related to international matters: U.N. (spanish: ONU), NATO (spanish: OTAN) and others.

    However, those acronyms related to technical stuff are usually not translated... except by overzealous Spaniards that have something similar to the French about translating everything into their language... and they extend this to tech stuff. You won't find any ISDN lines... but you'll find RSDI instead. Instead of routers, you'll find walkers (encaminadores). Instead of hubs, condensers (concentradores). I could go on and on...



  • @danixdefcon5 said:

    except by overzealous Spaniards that have something similar to the French about translating everything into their language.

    You should pity the poor Portuguese. They recently decided change to Brazilian spellings. Apparently 188 million Brazilians trumps the language of a mere 10 million Portuguese!



  • @OzPeter said:

    Apparently 188 million Brazilians trumps the language of a mere 10 million Portuguese!

    What is wrong with that?  It's precisely what I expect, that the language is defined by the majority of people utilizing it.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @OzPeter said:

    Apparently 188 million Brazilians trumps the language of a mere 10 million Portuguese!

    What is wrong with that?  It's precisely what I expect, that the language is defined by the majority of people utilizing it.

    I was thinking something like nationalistic pride. Can you imagine what the Brits would think if they had to go down the path of US English? After all 60 million Brits and 300 million Americans. Fairs fair.



  • @OzPeter said:

    nationalistic pride.
     

    I guess that is one way to put it.


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