No Loitering! Or else, there will be...trouble!



  • Had another "stimulating" interview experience today. It doesn't deal with the interview itself, but rather the events leading up to it.

    The interviewer was taking me back to his office for the interview and he had to stop off at the restroom. I wasn't about to go in with him, so I waited outside. Not less than 10 seconds later, this young guy yells out, "You a visitor?" as he's walking up to me.

    At this point I'm expecting him to say, "Welcome to our company." or something along those lines. So I'm smiling.

    I say, "Yes..." and before I can finish he says, "There's no loitering here! This area has highly sensitive information! I'm going to have to ask you to go to the front desk with me..."

    I interrupt him and say, "I'm with Mr. ____. He stopped off to use the restroom. I'm waiting on him."

    The young guy looks surprised and says, "Oh. Well, this is a very sensitive area. We have lots of confidential customer information here. This area is off limits to visitors."

    I'm standing there looking at the guy. Apparently he wanted a response from me. "Ooookay..." I say.

    I'm still looking at him and he's still looking at me. It's a really awkward situation. I wasn't giving him any indication that I was going to run over to one of the cubes and start hacking a PC, so he finally begins to turn and say, "Allright. But you be careful!"

    Or what? I'm thinking to myself. Or there will be...trouble? Who is this guy? Robocop?

    The interviewer finally gets out of the rest room and he asks me, "Is everything ok?" I say, "Yup!" because I know in my mind that there's no way I'm ever working at this place. The robocop guy was one of their web developers. How do I know? His badge said "Web Developer" on it. So I know that I would have the pleasure of working closely with him.

    A couple notes in closing:

    1. Way to greet a visitor on your campus. Nothing says "hello" like being viciously interrogated by your local web police.
    2. That young guy made it sound like he was guarding some sort of national treasure. What was he protecting? Credit card numbers? Customer's addresses? Please. This little company sells knickknacks on the internet. You mean to tell me that your data is so secretive that I need to be frisked every time I walk by? Whatever. I've worked at real high-level security facilities. Places that would make that young guy pee in his pants.



  • Let's see.. so the translation of this would be:

     - CPound (somehow) gets an interview with a company.  Everyone is very friendly/welcoming to him, while CPound is aloof and probably turns his nose up at the fact that nobody as this company seems to wear suits and ties.  Perhaps he saw someone with tattoos and/or piercings and wondered to himself how the company could employ such a crude animal and consider themselves professionals.

    - CPound excuses himself, saying he needs to use the restroom.  Instead, CPound begins snooping around the company's facilities for some reason or another, maybe to tail the tattooed person and "expose" him for the scary thug CPound knows he is, who might be blackmailing the CEO and/or performing other criminal acts without anyone knowing.

    - The web developer guy finds CPound and politely asks him what he's doing.  CPound is unable to come up with a response, and the interviewer is informed.  CPound is thanked for his time and asked to leave the premises (Alternative:  The tattooed and/or pierced "thug" is the one who asked CPound what he was doing, and CPound ran away for fear of getting jumped in the parking lot.  Alternative #2: CPound is thrown out of the company by security and told not to show his face again or charges will be pressed against him).

    - Frustrated that he's lost yet another interview (which in his mind means another group of folks who can't begin to comprehend his genius), CPound concocts the story we see here about an overly-inquisitive web developer who gives him the third degree about loitering, hoping to make us sympathize with him. 

     



  • I'm inclined to believe in the Warlock rather than on CPound because I can't believe someone would decline a job jsut because of such a meaningless incident.



  • There is a chance that CPound actually perceives the world like this.



  • It should be standard practice for every employee to issue spot challenges with unknown persons. Admittedly they should do so politely because (A) said individual could be the CEO's (insert family member) (B) If said individual is a secret operative trained in how to kill you with a paper clip and a sneeze you really don't want them to relise that you have just discovered them - It could be detremental for your health.


    They should also make the challenge without hinting at the areas security level. If they're lost you don't need to encourage them with promises of forbidden knowledge, and if they're there for specific purposes they are already well aware of the security level - and probably the forbidden knowledge.

    And yes, snotty nosed self important people always float to the top. They're nose's tend to double as sticky beaks too.



  • Why the hell would you waste your time interviewing with a "little company [that] sells knickknacks on the internet"? Go work in a real high-level security facility, then, without Internet access. Maybe then you'll post less here about your twisted paranoid work issues.



  • Come on people! CPound HAS shown some really twisted world views in the past, but that's no reason to tear up all his stories on a general basis. I'm pretty sure you all would have agreed without hesitation if this story had been posted by something else than him. And you don't seriously think everyone else here always tells the bare truth, do you?



  • If I were in a position to give up a potential job (because I may have others available), and some-one was that rude I'd probably do the same thing (I don't like confrontation). Other-wise I would just tell the interviewer.



    PSWorx> 404 posts gg.



  • @tster said:

    There is a chance that CPound actually perceives the world like this.

    If you assume LSD is involved, it wouldn't be very strange. I'm still going with the megahal theory, though. 



  • I said this in another post.

    CPound is doing social experiment research thing for a script he is working on.

    Possibly a movie or a TV sitcom based on a Genius-Geek guy with no social skills, who looses his job because of some misunderstanding, and tries to find a job on the real world, which leads to all kind of whacky situations and characters..

    I propose a game.. let's put a title on this Movie/Show...

    I vote for "My Name is Cpound" or "Get a Life!"... the poll is open. 

     



  • Apart from the " no way I'm ever working at this place" part, the story seems plausible to me.



  • @ammoQ said:

    Apart from the " no way I'm ever working at this place" part, the story seems plausible to me.

    I agree. And where I work, almost 100% of the building is employee only. All of our data is considered highly confidential (HIPAA, you know). When the vendor comes in every month or so to restock the vending machines, they are escorted the entire time they're in the building. Same goes for the people who pick up the shredding, or the guy who comes to fix the copier. Even people from higher up in the agency, but not assigned to our programs, is escorted. If someone isn't recognized as working here, and doesn't have an escort, they're challenged immediately and escorted to the reception area.

    And we have one administrative person who wouldn't hesitate to tackle someone who didn't pay attention to her. She's really scary. <g>
     



  • The strangest part, to me, is that they would have the title "Web Developer" on a badge.



  • @TheRubyWarlock said:

    Let's see.. so the translation of this would be:

     - CPound (somehow) gets an interview with a company.  Everyone is very friendly/welcoming to him, while CPound is aloof and probably turns his nose up at the fact that nobody as this company seems to wear suits and ties.  Perhaps he saw someone with tattoos and/or piercings and wondered to himself how the company could employ such a crude animal and consider themselves professionals.

    - CPound excuses himself, saying he needs to use the restroom.  Instead, CPound begins snooping around the company's facilities for some reason or another, maybe to tail the tattooed person and "expose" him for the scary thug CPound knows he is, who might be blackmailing the CEO and/or performing other criminal acts without anyone knowing.

    - The web developer guy finds CPound and politely asks him what he's doing.  CPound is unable to come up with a response, and the interviewer is informed.  CPound is thanked for his time and asked to leave the premises (Alternative:  The tattooed and/or pierced "thug" is the one who asked CPound what he was doing, and CPound ran away for fear of getting jumped in the parking lot.  Alternative #2: CPound is thrown out of the company by security and told not to show his face again or charges will be pressed against him).

    - Frustrated that he's lost yet another interview (which in his mind means another group of folks who can't begin to comprehend his genius), CPound concocts the story we see here about an overly-inquisitive web developer who gives him the third degree about loitering, hoping to make us sympathize with him. 

     

     

    What is with you guys? I mean I know CPound is a little (okay, generally) offensive, but honestly!  WTF?



  • Hey, I just thought about htis now... How long has it been since CPound began his interview circuit? Has he been jobless during all this time?

    I suggest a poll to see how much time it'll take before he can't refuse a position anymore and gets to work in some wicked and weird place because he's turned down on all the good job offerings.



  • It's the same here, where told to ask anyone who we don't know who they and why there here. Because a few years back a few laptops got stolen by people who just walked in, picked up a laptop and walked back out.

    But after reading C#'s story i reall really want a badge. those things are hip and also cool. 

     



  • [quote user="Renan "C#" Sousa"]

    Hey, I just thought about htis now... How long has it been since CPound began his interview circuit? Has he been jobless during all this time?

    I suggest a poll to see how much time it'll take before he can't refuse a position anymore and gets to work in some wicked and weird place because he's turned down on all the good job offerings.

    [/quote]

    I've been interviewing for some time now. Thankfully I have a nice savings to fall back upon, so I don't have to accept the first piece of crap shoved my way. And trust me, a lot of these companies I've been to are crap.

    But let me ask you something Renan. Do you really live in Brazil? I ask because I have read some of your posts about your job experiences and they all sound very...American. You live in the US, don't you? What else are you hiding from us? 



  • Sounds like pretty standard procedure to me, if the guy is rude that's a little wtfey but would you rather work at a company where people can just wander in off the street and into your office?  I've had this happen to me a couple of times and i've done it to people too, i usually like to be a bit more subtle with something like "Can i help you find someone/something", if they reply "Can i see your server room to use my 1337 h4x0r skillz to steal sensitive data" then i know something is up.

    I get the feeling from this story that CPound just doesn't like being questioned by someone younger than him, 'cos i reckon he thinks he's pretty awesome.  Plus CPound strikes me as the kind of guy that would be into pissy little company policies like "No visitors beyond this point" etc. and follow them ruthlessly to the letter, maybe i'm wrong and CPound is some sort of crazy company policy ignoring maverick but somehow i don't think so.

    Wow, the badge idea is funny, but i reckon some sort of helmet would be heaps better, maybe something like "WARNING!!!! Web Developer" written on it

     



  • You guys should go for Microsoft certifications then. When you get a credential, you get a big certificate signed by Mr. Gates., and a plastic card. It's not a badge nor a helmet, but hey they're shiny! Mine even says I'm a web developer on it.

    CP: I'm really in BR, if my stories sounds american, it's because things here are not very different from there when it comes to jobs in IT. But now that you mention it, let me tell you, cultural differences are a neverending source of WTF's. Specially when very few people who can code (well or badly) care to learn English... Well, just imagine every software documentation ever written was in Russian or Spanish and you'll have a slight idea of how most of my peers feel.



  • [quote user="Renan "C#" Sousa"] CP: I'm really in BR[/quote]

    Oh, don't worry about him, CPound exhibits behavior common to compulsive liars: they assume that everyone else must be lying too.

    -cw



  • OK, I've been reading cpound with interest for quite some time, and have joined up today specifically to call troll on cpound. I can't stand it any more.

     The final staw for me is a the claim that there are web developers out there who wear badges saying "Web Developer". UTTER UTTER UTTER CRAP!

    And to my mind, the real WTF in cpound's latest "story" is that he was prepared to turn down a job because someone wearing a Web Developer badge told him that he was in a restricted zone- and NOT because he was being interviewed by a company that forces their web developers to wear badges reading "Web Developer". (I'm sure cpound would rather like that idea, however I suspect a "Complete Tosspot" badge would need to be specially ordered).

    Did the interviewer have an "Interviewer" badge on?  Was the receptionist wearing a receptionist badge? CEO, VP, Sales, Java Dev, Sys Admin?

     Not even devs in huge web shops have to wear badges.


     



  • @milmin said:

     The final staw for me is a the claim that there are web developers out there who wear badges saying "Web Developer". UTTER UTTER UTTER CRAP!

    And to my mind, the real WTF in cpound's latest "story" is that he was prepared to turn down a job because someone wearing a Web Developer badge told him that he was in a restricted zone- and NOT because he was being interviewed by a company that forces their web developers to wear badges reading "Web Developer". (I'm sure cpound would rather like that idea, however I suspect a "Complete Tosspot" badge would need to be specially ordered).

    Did the interviewer have an "Interviewer" badge on?  Was the receptionist wearing a receptionist badge? CEO, VP, Sales, Java Dev, Sys Admin?

     Not even devs in huge web shops have to wear badges.

    Nonsense. A few years ago, I made several small intranet applications for a major telco in Austria. Every employee there had to wear a badge all the time, and if someone was working as a web developer, the badge said so. (Probably more like "IT internal web services" or so, but you get the point)



  • @ammoQ said:

    A few years ago, I made several small intranet applications for a major telco in Austria. Every employee there had to wear a badge all the time, and if someone was working as a web developer, the badge said so. (Probably more like "IT internal web services" or so, but you get the point)

    The thing to do in such a scenario is to modify your badge, so that it says something like "King of the code pile". Nobody will even notice.



  • Every employee there had to wear a badge

     
    Doesn't everyone in Austra have to wear a badge? If not, they should.

     

     



  • @milmin said:

    Every employee there had to wear a badge

     
    Doesn't everyone in Austra have to wear a badge? If not, they should.

    If that is supposed to be funny, I must have missed the humor. Probably because I am an Austrian. 



  • @ammoQ said:

    @milmin said:

     The final staw for me is a the claim that there are web developers out there who wear badges saying "Web Developer". UTTER UTTER UTTER CRAP!

    And to my mind, the real WTF in cpound's latest "story" is that he was prepared to turn down a job because someone wearing a Web Developer badge told him that he was in a restricted zone- and NOT because he was being interviewed by a company that forces their web developers to wear badges reading "Web Developer". (I'm sure cpound would rather like that idea, however I suspect a "Complete Tosspot" badge would need to be specially ordered).

    Did the interviewer have an "Interviewer" badge on?  Was the receptionist wearing a receptionist badge? CEO, VP, Sales, Java Dev, Sys Admin?

     Not even devs in huge web shops have to wear badges.

    Nonsense. A few years ago, I made several small intranet applications for a major telco in Austria. Every employee there had to wear a badge all the time, and if someone was working as a web developer, the badge said so. (Probably more like "IT internal web services" or so, but you get the point)

    I worked for a company that required badges for all employees.  To make sure you wore them, they also contained the RFID tags that allowed access to locked areas.  And by "locked areas" I mean "anywhere."  The company occupied all the suites in an office building, and each one required your badge to enter.  Even the door to reception was locked.  Of course, office doors also locked, which meant that if you ran to the bathroom (outside the office suites, and therefore just about the only doors that didn't require a card key) and forgot your badge, you were forced to go to reception, buzz in so that the receptionist would unlock the door, report your problem to her, wait for security to arrive, verify yourself with them, have them escort you back to your office, have them open the door, lead them to your desk, and show them your badge.  If your badge wasn't actually in your office (if, say, your idiot friend took it off your desk and threw in the 'fridge as revenge for switching his keyboard from English to German), security dragged you down to their office, where they issued you a new badge after contacting your supervisor.

    It sounds like a massive hassle in writing, but other than a few occasions (such as the situation with an idiot friend I mentioned above), it really wasn't that big a deal.  You got used to it pretty quickly, and we only had infrequent problems.  For example, like when the power went out for the first time after the security system was installed, and it was discovered that though the server room was on UPS, the door locks to the server room were not.  And though the door locks had battery backups in them, nobody had performed the monthly tests as specified by the company that had installed the system.  Which meant that the callout for them to unlock the damn server room was done on our company's dime.



  • @bstorer said:

    @ammoQ said:
    @milmin said:

     The final staw for me is a the claim that there are web developers out there who wear badges saying "Web Developer". UTTER UTTER UTTER CRAP!

    And to my mind, the real WTF in cpound's latest "story" is that he was prepared to turn down a job because someone wearing a Web Developer badge told him that he was in a restricted zone- and NOT because he was being interviewed by a company that forces their web developers to wear badges reading "Web Developer". (I'm sure cpound would rather like that idea, however I suspect a "Complete Tosspot" badge would need to be specially ordered).

    Did the interviewer have an "Interviewer" badge on?  Was the receptionist wearing a receptionist badge? CEO, VP, Sales, Java Dev, Sys Admin?

     Not even devs in huge web shops have to wear badges.

    Nonsense. A few years ago, I made several small intranet applications for a major telco in Austria. Every employee there had to wear a badge all the time, and if someone was working as a web developer, the badge said so. (Probably more like "IT internal web services" or so, but you get the point)

    I worked for a company that required badges for all employees.  To make sure you wore them, they also contained the RFID tags that allowed access to locked areas.  And by "locked areas" I mean "anywhere."  The company occupied all the suites in an office building, and each one required your badge to enter.  Even the door to reception was locked.  Of course, office doors also locked, which meant that if you ran to the bathroom (outside the office suites, and therefore just about the only doors that didn't require a card key) and forgot your badge, you were forced to go to reception, buzz in so that the receptionist would unlock the door, report your problem to her, wait for security to arrive, verify yourself with them, have them escort you back to your office, have them open the door, lead them to your desk, and show them your badge.  If your badge wasn't actually in your office (if, say, your idiot friend took it off your desk and threw in the 'fridge as revenge for switching his keyboard from English to German), security dragged you down to their office, where they issued you a new badge after contacting your supervisor.

    It sounds like a massive hassle in writing, but other than a few occasions (such as the situation with an idiot friend I mentioned above), it really wasn't that big a deal.  You got used to it pretty quickly, and we only had infrequent problems.  For example, like when the power went out for the first time after the security system was installed, and it was discovered that though the server room was on UPS, the door locks to the server room were not.  And though the door locks had battery backups in them, nobody had performed the monthly tests as specified by the company that had installed the system.  Which meant that the callout for them to unlock the damn server room was done on our company's dime.

    WOW I really hope the RFID tags weren't the only security there preventing random peeps from accessing any secure rooms. Otherwise in minutes anyone could easily clone a full set of random employees tags as they were entering the building first thing in the morning. Instant access to all the pleasures of the building.



  • @Hitsuji said:

    @bstorer said:
    @ammoQ said:
    @milmin said:

     The final staw for me is a the claim that there are web developers out there who wear badges saying "Web Developer". UTTER UTTER UTTER CRAP!

    And to my mind, the real WTF in cpound's latest "story" is that he was prepared to turn down a job because someone wearing a Web Developer badge told him that he was in a restricted zone- and NOT because he was being interviewed by a company that forces their web developers to wear badges reading "Web Developer". (I'm sure cpound would rather like that idea, however I suspect a "Complete Tosspot" badge would need to be specially ordered).

    Did the interviewer have an "Interviewer" badge on?  Was the receptionist wearing a receptionist badge? CEO, VP, Sales, Java Dev, Sys Admin?

     Not even devs in huge web shops have to wear badges.

    Nonsense. A few years ago, I made several small intranet applications for a major telco in Austria. Every employee there had to wear a badge all the time, and if someone was working as a web developer, the badge said so. (Probably more like "IT internal web services" or so, but you get the point)

    I worked for a company that required badges for all employees.  To make sure you wore them, they also contained the RFID tags that allowed access to locked areas.  And by "locked areas" I mean "anywhere."  The company occupied all the suites in an office building, and each one required your badge to enter.  Even the door to reception was locked.  Of course, office doors also locked, which meant that if you ran to the bathroom (outside the office suites, and therefore just about the only doors that didn't require a card key) and forgot your badge, you were forced to go to reception, buzz in so that the receptionist would unlock the door, report your problem to her, wait for security to arrive, verify yourself with them, have them escort you back to your office, have them open the door, lead them to your desk, and show them your badge.  If your badge wasn't actually in your office (if, say, your idiot friend took it off your desk and threw in the 'fridge as revenge for switching his keyboard from English to German), security dragged you down to their office, where they issued you a new badge after contacting your supervisor.

    It sounds like a massive hassle in writing, but other than a few occasions (such as the situation with an idiot friend I mentioned above), it really wasn't that big a deal.  You got used to it pretty quickly, and we only had infrequent problems.  For example, like when the power went out for the first time after the security system was installed, and it was discovered that though the server room was on UPS, the door locks to the server room were not.  And though the door locks had battery backups in them, nobody had performed the monthly tests as specified by the company that had installed the system.  Which meant that the callout for them to unlock the damn server room was done on our company's dime.

    WOW I really hope the RFID tags weren't the only security there preventing random peeps from accessing any secure rooms. Otherwise in minutes anyone could easily clone a full set of random employees tags as they were entering the building first thing in the morning. Instant access to all the pleasures of the building.

    I don't think there was the kind of exposure on the security flaws of RFID that we have now.  I certainly don't recall it ever coming up.  This was seven or eight years ago, back when RFID was the Wave of the Future(TM), instead of Commonplace and Kinda Annoying(TM).

    But to answer your question, yes, all interior doors used strictly RFID access (which made the server room problem so major).  The exterior doors were standard locks, opened each day by facilities, with keys given to emergency-call-out employees.  This replaced a system of swipe cards and old-fashioned keys.  I haven't been by there in some time, but I still know people working there; I'll find out what crazy system they're on to now.  Probably something involving (ugh) biometrics.



  • @bstorer said:

    I worked for a company that required badges for all employees.  To make sure you wore them, they also contained the RFID tags that allowed access to locked areas.  And by "locked areas" I mean "anywhere."  The company occupied all the suites in an office building, and each one required your badge to enter.  Even the door to reception was locked.  Of course, office doors also locked, which meant that if you ran to the bathroom (outside the office suites, and therefore just about the only doors that didn't require a card key) and forgot your badge, you were forced to go to reception, buzz in so that the receptionist would unlock the door, report your problem to her, wait for security to arrive, verify yourself with them, have them escort you back to your office, have them open the door, lead them to your desk, and show them your badge.  If your badge wasn't actually in your office (if, say, your idiot friend took it off your desk and threw in the 'fridge as revenge for switching his keyboard from English to German), security dragged you down to their office, where they issued you a new badge after contacting your supervisor.

    It sounds like a massive hassle in writing, but other than a few occasions (such as the situation with an idiot friend I mentioned above), it really wasn't that big a deal.

    Several of the large technology companies use a system like this - I know offhand that IBM have similar procedures at several of their large sites. They put a moderate amount of effort into designing the system so that it all runs reasonably smoothly, while enabling them to rapidly locate and contain individuals in an emergency (the megacorps still have occasional problems with industrial espionage, so they tend to have moderate levels of physical security at their high-value locations).

    The problem is when smaller, stupider companies engage in cargo-cult emulation of these systems. 



  • @bstorer said:

    @Hitsuji said:

    WOW I really hope the RFID tags weren't the only security there preventing random peeps from accessing any secure rooms. Otherwise in minutes anyone could easily clone a full set of random employees tags as they were entering the building first thing in the morning. Instant access to all the pleasures of the building.

    I don't think there was the kind of exposure on the security flaws of RFID
    that we have now.  I certainly don't recall it ever coming up.  This was seven or eight years ago, back when RFID was the Wave of the Future(TM), instead of Commonplace and Kinda Annoying(TM).

    RFID systems are not intrinsically insecure, it's just that the things that governments, car manufacturers, and similar parasites like to purchase are cheap and stupid. You can get secure ones, which provide true cryptographic security for the session, and are therefore immune to cloning and privacy issues, and are suitable replacements for traditional lock-and-key security systems. Naturally, they are somewhat more expensive, since the tag contains cryptographic hardware.

    (You can also get a great many things that claim to be secure, but aren't) 



  • @asuffield said:

    @bstorer said:
    @Hitsuji said:

    WOW I really hope the RFID tags weren't the only security there preventing random peeps from accessing any secure rooms. Otherwise in minutes anyone could easily clone a full set of random employees tags as they were entering the building first thing in the morning. Instant access to all the pleasures of the building.

    I don't think there was the kind of exposure on the security flaws of RFID that we have now.  I certainly don't recall it ever coming up.  This was seven or eight years ago, back when RFID was the Wave of the Future(TM), instead of Commonplace and Kinda Annoying(TM).

    RFID systems are not intrinsically insecure, it's just that the things that governments, car manufacturers, and similar parasites like to purchase are cheap and stupid. You can get secure ones, which provide true cryptographic security for the session, and are therefore immune to cloning and privacy issues, and are suitable replacements for traditional lock-and-key security systems. Naturally, they are somewhat more expensive, since the tag contains cryptographic hardware.

     

    (You can also get a great many things that claim to be secure, but aren't) 

     

    Just like the RFID chips in e-passports?



  • @Hitsuji said:

    @asuffield said:

    RFID systems are not intrinsically insecure, it's just that the things that governments, car manufacturers, and similar parasites like to purchase are cheap and stupid. You can get secure ones, which provide true cryptographic security for the session, and are therefore immune to cloning and privacy issues, and are suitable replacements for traditional lock-and-key security systems. Naturally, they are somewhat more expensive, since the tag contains cryptographic hardware.

     

    (You can also get a great many things that claim to be secure, but aren't) 

    Just like the RFID chips in e-passports?

    Those are doubly ironic. When the original proposals were made, there was considerable objection due to the complete lack of security in the design. To 'solve' this problem, the government department responsible for it declared the design to be secure, then proceeded to ignore all further objections and go ahead with their plan. I am really not sure what they thought this would accomplish.



  • RFID and security badges are all very well, and I think most people who've had a career have worn them, but the badge under discussion here says "Web Developer"

    Little companies that "sells knickknacks on the internet" don't usually have badges, and even less so badges that say "Web Developer"

    cpound is a little too thin-skinned methinks.
     

     



  • @ammoQ said:

    @milmin said:

    Every employee there had to wear a badge


    Doesn't everyone in Austra have to wear a badge? If not, they should.

    If that is supposed to be funny, I must have missed the humor. Probably because I am an Austrian. 

    If Austria is anything like the other Germanic countries you are never further than 20 meters from a "Verbotsschild" - just so you can keep up with the enormous number of petty rules you need to be aware of. I spent 7 years living with that crap in Switzerland. If that ain't funny I don't know what is.

     



  • I wanna bag cpound's post, not Austrians although....

     



  • @zedhex said:

    @ammoQ said:
    @milmin said:

    Every employee there had to wear a badge


    Doesn't everyone in Austra have to wear a badge? If not, they should.

    If that is supposed to be funny, I must have missed the humor. Probably because I am an Austrian. 

    If Austria is anything like the other Germanic countries you are never further than 20 meters from a "Verbotsschild" - just so you can keep up with the enormous number of petty rules you need to be aware of. I spent 7 years living with that crap in Switzerland. If that ain't funny I don't know what is.
     

    I think we are a bit more relaxed in Austria than in Germany or Switzerland, but well... we definitely do not have a lack of prohibition signs either. 


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