You just went full hungarian



  • Words fail. It's happened. It's finally happened...

    [code]foreach (string strString in Request.Form)[/code]



  • I'm going slightly mad...



  • string str_type_starts_with_s_type_ends_with_g_variable_name_is_String_end_of_name = "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"



  • @Ben L. said:

    string str_type_starts_with_s_type_ends_with_g_variable_name_is_String_end_of_name = "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"[b].ToString()[/b]
     

    .TS()TFY



  • Fun justification I've heard for something similar this week: "The name was already taken so I needed a prefix".



  • @witchdoctor said:

    Fun justification I've heard for something similar this week: "The name was already taken so I needed a prefix".

    In other words, "'string' was taken so I had to use 'strString'."



  • @bridget99 said:

    @witchdoctor said:
    Fun justification I've heard for something similar this week: "The name was already taken so I needed a prefix".

    In other words, "'string' was taken so I had to use 'strString'."

     

    Next we need REVERSE Hungraian. That's either where you do stringStr-- or it's some advanced maneuver that my college Morbs will demonstrate on this inanimate sex doll. Please ignore its screams of pain and pleas to be released of this hell. It's all part of the show.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    Next we need REVERSE Hungraian. That's either where you do stringStr-- or it's some advanced maneuver that my college Morbs will demonstrate on this inanimate sex doll. Please ignore its screams of pain and pleas to be released of this hell. It's all part of the show.

    Or Double-Hungarian. strStringStr - gettin' the str from both ends.



  • @mikeTheLiar said:

    Or Double-Hungarian. strStringStr - gettin' the str from both ends.
     

     I'm going to put together an acapella percussion band based on Hungarian notation.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    Next we need REVERSE Hungraian.

    I got nothin'. That's what sucks about having work to do: by the time you're done you're too exhausted to think up clever jokes.

    But a "reverse Hungarian" does sound like something you'd pay a prostitute for.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @Lorne Kates said:
    Next we need REVERSE Hungraian.

    I got nothin'. That's what sucks about having work to do: by the time you're done you're too exhausted to think up clever jokes.

    But a "reverse Hungarian" does sound like something you'd pay a prostitute for.

    I once had a very long conversation with some friends about what a "reverse unicorn" was.



  •  String variables should just have a '$' at the end, like God intended them to. 26 floating point variables, A to Z, and 26 string variables, A$ to Z$. If you need more than that, your code sucks anyway.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    or it's some advanced maneuver that my college Morbs will demonstrate on this inanimate sex doll.


    Your college has a Morbs? Lucky! My college always wanted one, but the admin would never put aside a budget for it.

    Of course, we had the inanimate sex doll. There was always a budget for that.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Ben L. said:

    I once had a very long conversation with some friends about what a "reverse unicorn" was.
    Care to elucidate? All Google's throwing at me at the moment is zit popping and dodgy hairstyles.



  • Yep. I see this in spades, every day.

    Some of us are using a similar convention for our class and method names. Firstly, you can prefix all our classes or interfaces with a capital letter, let's say "X" so we can tell what's ours because hey, source code and namespaces just aren't enough. If the method is allowed to be overridden, you add "Overrideable", not forgetting the visibility modifier of course. Then you can get on with actually naming what the method does. You end up with stuff like this:

    public class XDateTimeUtils

    {

    public DateTime  PubliclyOverrideableParseDateTimeFromStream(Stream theStream)

    {

    //snip..

    }

    }

    But we don't bother with things like exception handling or validating input parameters, because that's for pussies. People here go on about the "fast-fail" principle, but our error handling often consists of an out parameter called "ErrorsList" or something. Having to check the errorslist every time you call a method certainly is fail, but definitely not fast.

    Every time I have to explain this to a new employee the baby jesus cries.

     



  • Isn't a reverse unicorn the same thing as a double frogman? Or am I getting it confused with a rusty venture?


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