Lost



  • I gave a class to some other programmers on Friday (Java Swing essentials) in the conference room. Apparently, I'd taken my reading glasses with me. Upon finishing the class, I had, also apparently, left these same glasses behind.

    Upon arriving for work Monday, I discovered my glasses were missing from my desk. On a hunch, I went back to the conference room to see if I had left them there after the class. They weren't there. I sent out an e-mail to the group of programmers and system administrators asking that if they'd seen them, to please notify me so I could get them back.

    Tuesday, I bring in my pair of glasses from home, hoping that my original pair would turn up. Nothing turned up on my glasses that day.

    Wednesday, I send out an e-mail to the entire organization, essentially echoing my previous one to the programmers/administrators. Shortly thereafter, someone from operations comes to my desk with glasses in-hand, asking if they were the ones I had misplaced. He had used the conference room later on Friday, discovered the glasses, and had taken them back to his desk (I guess for safe keeping.)

    WTF #1. Why would you pick up something and take it away from where a person who misplaced it could find it?

    WTF #2. If you did find something and had stashed it way for safe keeping, why would you not announce its discovery so that he person who misplaced it could know where to retrieve it?



  • He was getting revenge against you for teaching Java Swing.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    He was getting revenge against you for teaching Java Swing.

    Well, at least they'll do it right (aka, my way) instead of doing some random-ass crap that no one understands.



  • Java swing?

    You mean they serve coffee at swingers parties, hosted in your companies conference room



  • @blakeyrat said:

    He was getting revenge against you for teaching Java Swing.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    He was getting revenge against you for teaching Java Swing.
     

    You mean there are people whose goal is not to bring a consistently ugly UI on all platforms?



  • @zelmak said:

    Well, at least they'll do it right (aka, my way) instead of doing some random-ass crap that no one understands.
     

    // TODO: insert snark remark implying they're both the same thing



  • @Cassidy said:

    @zelmak said:

    Well, at least they'll do it right (aka, my way) instead of doing some random-ass crap that no one understands.
     

    // TODO: insert snark remark implying they're both the same thing

    It may be crappy, but at least its consistent! :)



  • @TGV said:

    You mean there are people whose goal is not to bring a consistently ugly UI on all platforms?
     


    Well, there's the HTML/CSS/Javascript evangelists.

    Their goal is to bring an INconsistently ugly UI to all platforms.

     



  • My sympathies.

    I ride my bicycle around our (small) town, and sometimes I have to park it for a day or two while I take a bus or train somewhere.The ONLY times it has gone missing is when some XXX#@! takes it and hides it because he's afraid that someone ELSE will steal it. Argh!

    In my case asking people near the last known location has always turned it up. But I am careful to be polite and not bite someone's head off.



  • @zelmak said:

    Well, at least they'll do it right (aka, my way) instead of doing some random-ass crap that no one understands.
    With the latter, I presume the numerous eamples that Sun provided on their web site?

    Made that mistake with my very first Java project: follow the Swing examples on Sun's site. These days, I know better and simply don't write GUIs any longer.

     



  • @zelmak said:

    I gave a class to some other programmers on Friday (Java Swing essentials) in the conference room. Apparently, I'd taken my reading glasses with me. Upon finishing the class, I had, also apparently, left these same glasses behind.

    Upon arriving for work Monday, I discovered my glasses were missing from my desk. On a hunch, I went back to the conference room to see if I had left them there after the class. They weren't there. I sent out an e-mail to the group of programmers and system administrators asking that if they'd seen them, to please notify me so I could get them back.

    Tuesday, I bring in my pair of glasses from home, hoping that my original pair would turn up. Nothing turned up on my glasses that day.

    Wednesday, I send out an e-mail to the entire organization, essentially echoing my previous one to the programmers/administrators. Shortly thereafter, someone from operations comes to my desk with glasses in-hand, asking if they were the ones I had misplaced. He had used the conference room later on Friday, discovered the glasses, and had taken them back to his desk (I guess for safe keeping.)

    WTF #1. Why would you pick up something and take it away from where a person who misplaced it could find it?

    WTF #2. If you did find something and had stashed it way for safe keeping, why would you not announce its discovery so that he person who misplaced it could know where to retrieve it?

    I lost my glasses and the guy who found them kept them at his desk until I sent a company-wide email asking if anyone had seen them.

    See, that entire story can be short enough for a tweet if you take out the parts about irrelevant characters and superfluous details. And yet, the short version does not remove any value to the story because the initial narrative was not engaging enough.

    Advice of the week: be concise or be entertaining.



  • @AndyCanfield said:

    My sympathies.

    I ride my bicycle around our (small) town, and sometimes I have to park it for a day or two while I take a bus or train somewhere.The ONLY times it has gone missing is when some XXX#@! takes it and hides it because he's afraid that someone ELSE will steal it. Argh!

    In my case asking people near the last known location has always turned it up. But I am careful to be polite and not bite someone's head off.

    I believe there is a specific gene that makes some people do things like that. It's the same gene that causes people in a corporate environment to reply-all to tell people not to reply-all. Or on the highway during a big snowstorm to put the blinkers on so people coming behind can't tell if someone is driving slow or is stopped for an emergency.

    I don't know the scientific name but it's commonly known as "being a well-intentioned idiot".



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @zelmak said:


    I left my glasses behind in a room and some guy secretly kept them at his desk until I sent a company-wide email asking if anyone had seen them.

    See, that entire story can be shortened by removing superfluous details and clarifying the abbreviated version.

    AT(ATFY)FY.

  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Speakerphone Dude said:


    Advice of the week: be concise and be entertaining.

    FTFY


  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @zelmak said:

    I gave a class to some other programmers on Friday (Java Swing essentials) in the conference room. Apparently, I'd taken my reading glasses with me. Upon finishing the class, I had, also apparently, left these same glasses behind.

    Upon arriving for work Monday, I discovered my glasses were missing from my desk. On a hunch, I went back to the conference room to see if I had left them there after the class. They weren't there. I sent out an e-mail to the group of programmers and system administrators asking that if they'd seen them, to please notify me so I could get them back.

    Tuesday, I bring in my pair of glasses from home, hoping that my original pair would turn up. Nothing turned up on my glasses that day.

    Wednesday, I send out an e-mail to the entire organization, essentially echoing my previous one to the programmers/administrators. Shortly thereafter, someone from operations comes to my desk with glasses in-hand, asking if they were the ones I had misplaced. He had used the conference room later on Friday, discovered the glasses, and had taken them back to his desk (I guess for safe keeping.)

    WTF #1. Why would you pick up something and take it away from where a person who misplaced it could find it?

    WTF #2. If you did find something and had stashed it way for safe keeping, why would you not announce its discovery so that he person who misplaced it could know where to retrieve it?

    I lost my glasses and the guy who found them kept them at his desk until I sent a company-wide email asking if anyone had seen them.

    See, that entire story can be short enough for a tweet if you take out the parts about irrelevant characters and superfluous details. And yet, the short version does not remove any value to the story because the initial narrative was not engaging enough.

    Advice of the week: be concise or be entertaining.

     

    There you go.

     



  • @dhromed said:

    @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @zelmak said:

    I gave a class to some other programmers on Friday (Java Swing essentials) in the conference room. Apparently, I'd taken my reading glasses with me. Upon finishing the class, I had, also apparently, left these same glasses behind.

    Upon arriving for work Monday, I discovered my glasses were missing from my desk. On a hunch, I went back to the conference room to see if I had left them there after the class. They weren't there. I sent out an e-mail to the group of programmers and system administrators asking that if they'd seen them, to please notify me so I could get them back.

    Tuesday, I bring in my pair of glasses from home, hoping that my original pair would turn up. Nothing turned up on my glasses that day.

    Wednesday, I send out an e-mail to the entire organization, essentially echoing my previous one to the programmers/administrators. Shortly thereafter, someone from operations comes to my desk with glasses in-hand, asking if they were the ones I had misplaced. He had used the conference room later on Friday, discovered the glasses, and had taken them back to his desk (I guess for safe keeping.)

    WTF #1. Why would you pick up something and take it away from where a person who misplaced it could find it?

    WTF #2. If you did find something and had stashed it way for safe keeping, why would you not announce its discovery so that he person who misplaced it could know where to retrieve it?

    I lost my glasses and the guy who found them kept them at his desk until I sent a company-wide email asking if anyone had seen them.

    See, that entire story can be short enough for a tweet if you take out the parts about irrelevant characters and superfluous details. And yet, the short version does not remove any value to the story because the initial narrative was not engaging enough.

    Advice of the week: be concise or be entertaining.

    There you go.


  • @PJH said:

    @dhromed said:

    @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @zelmak said:

    I gave a class to some other programmers on Friday (Java Swing essentials) in the conference room. Apparently, I'd taken my reading glasses with me. Upon finishing the class, I had, also apparently, left these same glasses behind.

    Upon arriving for work Monday, I discovered my glasses were missing from my desk. On a hunch, I went back to the conference room to see if I had left them there after the class. They weren't there. I sent out an e-mail to the group of programmers and system administrators asking that if they'd seen them, to please notify me so I could get them back.

    Tuesday, I bring in my pair of glasses from home, hoping that my original pair would turn up. Nothing turned up on my glasses that day.

    Wednesday, I send out an e-mail to the entire organization, essentially echoing my previous one to the programmers/administrators. Shortly thereafter, someone from operations comes to my desk with glasses in-hand, asking if they were the ones I had misplaced. He had used the conference room later on Friday, discovered the glasses, and had taken them back to his desk (I guess for safe keeping.)

    WTF #1. Why would you pick up something and take it away from where a person who misplaced it could find it?

    WTF #2. If you did find something and had stashed it way for safe keeping, why would you not announce its discovery so that he person who misplaced it could know where to retrieve it?

    I lost my glasses and the guy who found them kept them at his desk until I sent a company-wide email asking if anyone had seen them.

    See, that entire story can be short enough for a tweet if you take out the parts about irrelevant characters and superfluous details. And yet, the short version does not remove any value to the story because the initial narrative was not engaging enough.

    Advice of the week: be concise or be entertaining.

    There you go.

     

    Ahaa, I can... you post... has no...

    oh.

     



  • ModFight!



  • @Cassidy said:

    ModFight!

    This is tame compared to what goes on in the mod's forum on here...



  • — That's not going to fit!

    — oops never mind



  •  Bububutttt.... we only see what's OUTSIDE the asylum!



  • With your feet in the air and your head on the ground, try this trick and spin it, yeah! Your head will collapse 'cause there's nothing in it and you'll ask yourself, "where is my mind?"


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @zelmak said:

    WTF #1. Why would you pick up something and take it away from where a person who misplaced it could find it?

    WTF #2. If you did find something and had stashed it way for safe keeping, why would you not announce its discovery so that he person who misplaced it could know where to retrieve it?

    About a year ago I found an iPad 2 sitting in the 2nd floor lobby of my workplace. There were easily over a hundred people in the offices, the majority of whom I was not acquainted with, so I had no clue who it might belong to.

    (#1) I picked it up because it was valuable and anyone might grab it if I left it in the open.

    I took it to the front desk receptionist for safe-keeping until its owner claimed it.

    (#2) I didn't announce it was discovered because anyone might say "hey, I lost an iPad," but it was unlikely that someone would know there was an iPad to be claimed if it was not announced.



    I do realize it's much less likely someone would steal your eyeglasses deliberately, than a valuable tablet.



    I found out someone did eventually claim it, but four hours after I'd found it - so it might well have been stolen by then, if I hadn't moved it; but maybe it just took that long for them to get desperate enough to ask the front desk.



  • @PJH said:

    @dhromed said:

    @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @zelmak said:

    I gave a class to some other programmers on Friday (Java Swing essentials) in the conference room. Apparently, I'd taken my reading glasses with me. Upon finishing the class, I had, also apparently, left these same glasses behind.

    Upon arriving for work Monday, I discovered my glasses were missing from my desk. On a hunch, I went back to the conference room to see if I had left them there after the class. They weren't there. I sent out an e-mail to the group of programmers and system administrators asking that if they'd seen them, to please notify me so I could get them back.

    Tuesday, I bring in my pair of glasses from home, hoping that my original pair would turn up. Nothing turned up on my glasses that day.

    Wednesday, I send out an e-mail to the entire organization, essentially echoing my previous one to the programmers/administrators. Shortly thereafter, someone from operations comes to my desk with glasses in-hand, asking if they were the ones I had misplaced. He had used the conference room later on Friday, discovered the glasses, and had taken them back to his desk (I guess for safe keeping.)

    WTF #1. Why would you pick up something and take it away from where a person who misplaced it could find it?

    WTF #2. If you did find something and had stashed it way for safe keeping, why would you not announce its discovery so that he person who misplaced it could know where to retrieve it?

    I lost my glasses and the guy who found them kept them at his desk until I sent a company-wide email asking if anyone had seen them.

    See, that entire story can be short enough for a tweet if you take out the parts about irrelevant characters and superfluous details. And yet, the short version does not remove any value to the story because the initial narrative was not engaging enough.

    Advice of the week: be concise or be entertaining.

    There you go.

    Beautiful, it's like my favorite song from John Cage, 4:33. (here is another link for lame people)



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    Beautiful, it's like my favorite song from John Cage, 4:33. (here is another link for lame people)

    @Wikipedia said:

    Several performances of 4′33″ including a "techno remix" by New Waver were broadcast on Australian radio station ABC Classic FM, as part of a program exploring "sonic responses" to Cage's work.<FONT size=2>[27]</FONT>

    :boggle:



  • @zelmak said:

    @Wikipedia said:

    Several performances of 4′33″ including a "techno remix" by New Waver were broadcast on Australian radio station ABC Classic FM, as part of a program exploring "sonic responses" to Cage's work.<font size="2">[27]</font>

    :boggle:

    LOL!!!

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