Priorities



  • Background:

    1. It is our company policy that all employees have laptops.

    2. Our company was recently sold off. As such, the new owners are in cost-cutting mode; no money for laptops for new employees (so they work with retired secretary's desktops), etc.

    Story:

    Just before the new owners took over, it was decided that all four of our 4-stall bathrooms would be redone, 2 at a time. Over an 11 week period (when we redid a full bathroom at home, it took 2.5 days).

    They are now in the process of replacing the tile walls with marble, the laminate-covered particle board countertops with granite, and the cheap-o toilet seats with fine wood.

    That's right, in only 7 more weeks, half of our team will still have crippled outdated desktops, but we will be able to pee in oppulance.



  • @snoofle said:

    They are now in the process of replacing the tile walls with marble, the laminate-covered particle board countertops with granite, and the cheap-o toilet seats with fine wood.

    That's right, in only 7 more weeks, half of our team will still have crippled outdated desktops, but we will be able to pee in oppulance.

     

    At least they know what's important.  Maybe the reason new employees haven't been given laptops is because of the bathroom renovations; the owners are worried that the john will be so nice that people will take their laptops and work in there instead of at their desks.  It wouldn't be the first time the bathrooms have been the nicest part of the office.

    I'm a little jealous, honestly.  I'd be happy just to have fixtures here that consistently flushed properly instead of occasionally spraying water all over the floor.



  • You know in an RTS where you have that black cloud over parts you haven't seen yet, and a grey cloud over areas you have seen but have no units in direct vicinity of?

    This is like that. The red units know what the red units see, and the blue units know what the blue units see.

    Lacking overview, they act accordingly to what they know. Which leads to shit. Also, to absurdities like v. large companies suing themselves.



  • What really gets me wound up are the really, blatantly obvious false economies I see all the time. Like saving 20 quid on a pack of spare mice, but losing 20 minutes of highly paid time every time someone goes hunting round the office for the one (possibly) spare mouse. Or losing the 250k per year contract because you didn't want to employ an extra 30k per year mobile engineer because he wouldn't be fully utilised - actually, I think they got away with that, it was trying to save money by not buying a new answering machine that lost that contract before the engineer became an issue. Don't go and buy 50 quids worth of cheap screwdrivers, no, store the screwdrivers in the manager's safe and make people request and return them every time they need them, because his time's not worth anything. And on, and on, and on. Every business I see, you'd think must be an especially bad exception, but no - they're all like that because people don't think more than five minutes ahead.



  • @davedavenotdavemaybedave said:

    What really gets me wound up are the really, blatantly obvious false economies I see all the time. Like saving 20 quid on a pack of spare mice, but losing 20 minutes of highly paid time every time someone goes hunting round the office for the one (possibly) spare mouse. Or losing the 250k per year contract because you didn't want to employ an extra 30k per year mobile engineer because he wouldn't be fully utilised - actually, I think they got away with that, it was trying to save money by not buying a new answering machine that lost that contract before the engineer became an issue. Don't go and buy 50 quids worth of cheap screwdrivers, no, store the screwdrivers in the manager's safe and make people request and return them every time they need them, because his time's not worth anything. And on, and on, and on. Every business I see, you'd think must be an especially bad exception, but no - they're all like that because people don't think more than five minutes ahead.

    I work for a software development company. About half of our staff are located on-site at our biggest client's premises, where they get infrastructure provided by the building's IT department. The computers our client gives us to work on are better than the computers our employer gives us.

    This, of course, while the directors and PMs of my company each spend $ 1,500 of company money on laptops so that they can be productive "in the field". Most of these laptops are never used outside of work hours, and I never knew 4GB of RAM and a Blu-Ray reader was required for playing in MS Project and reading email all day. Meanwhile, some of the junior devs sit with socket 939 Athlon X2s with 2GB of RAM, and they're expected to run multiple instances of Visual Studio, SQL Server Management Studio, etc.

    And then the directors and PMs wonder why their employee turnover rate is so high. (On that topic, I'm pretty sure Joel Spolsky wrote an article on why the PC you give a developer to work on should be at least as powerful as their home PC, but I cannae find it now. If anyone has a link, I'd be most grateful.)



  •  At my employer, we spent 2 weeks going through a governance process to get me a computer...two weeks where I sat on my hands with nothing to do, in which I was paid twice the cost of the computer being considered for approval. That seemed mildly inefficient.



  • Ok, forgive me for not being British, but what exactly is a "quid?" I hear this word all the time, and it sounds like a quantity of money, but I can't for the life of me figure out which one... is it another word for "pound?"



  •  Blech, fine wood toilet seats? Is your company in the time machine business and you are actually workig in the 1970s?



  •  @blakeyrat said:

    Ok, forgive me for not being British, but what exactly is a "quid?" I hear this word all the time, and it sounds like a quantity of money, but I can't for the life of me figure out which one... is it another word for "pound?"

    By my non-brit understanding that is correct.



  • @locallunatic said:

     @blakeyrat said:

    Ok, forgive me for not being British, but what exactly is a "quid?" I hear this word all the time, and it sounds like a quantity of money, but I can't for the life of me figure out which one... is it another word for "pound?"

    By my non-brit understanding that is correct.

    Wikipedia (which I don't normally think of as listing slang, but hey there it is) agrees as well.

    New rule! Let's start calling the dollar the "wheezle" just to confuse people! I bought a 8 wheezle lunch today.



  • @blakeyrat said:

     New rule! Let's start calling the dollar the "wheezle" just to confuse people! I bought a 8 wheezle lunch today.

     

     

    Just because the Dollar is more ubiquituous and therefore the slang
    terms are (I don't doubt they know what a "buck" is in the UK) doesn't
    mean you can start complaining about their currencies and the slang
    terms they use just because you've never heard of them.




  • @BC_Programmer said:

    Just because the Dollar is more ubiquituous and therefore the slang
    terms are (I don't doubt they know what a "buck" is in the UK) doesn't
    mean you can start complaining about their currencies and the slang
    terms they use just because you've never heard of them.
     

    I'd say that people knowing American slag has more to do with the wide distribution of movies, music, and such then about how common the term Dollar is.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    New rule! Let's start calling the dollar the "wheezle" just to confuse people! I bought a 8 wheezle lunch today.
    Dude, I wouldn't go around telling people your lunch was eight weasels. Just sayin'.

    Serious question: do any other countries whose unit of currency is the (non-U.S.) dollar use the slang "bucks", or is that strictly an American thing?

    (Edited to add: my fault for not reloading before posting, but I'm still interested to know since the question wasn't strictly answered in the above posts.)



  • @cconroy said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    New rule! Let's start calling the dollar the "wheezle" just to confuse people! I bought a 8 wheezle lunch today.
    Dude, I wouldn't go around telling people your lunch was eight weasels. Just sayin'.
     

    I agree, 8 makes you sound like a fatass.



  • @cconroy said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    New rule! Let's start calling the dollar the "wheezle" just to confuse people! I bought a 8 wheezle lunch today.
    Dude, I wouldn't go around telling people your lunch was eight weasels. Just sayin'.

    Serious question: do any other countries whose unit of currency is the (non-U.S.) dollar use the slang "bucks", or is that strictly an American thing?

    (Edited to add: my fault for not reloading before posting, but I'm still interested to know since the question wasn't strictly answered in the above posts.)

    Yes. New Zealand at least does, and I'm fairly sure Aussies do too. Also buckaroo and occasionally buckarooga, although that might just be my family.



  • @cconroy said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    New rule! Let's start calling the dollar the "wheezle" just to confuse people! I bought a 8 wheezle lunch today.
    Dude, I wouldn't go around telling people your lunch was eight weasels. Just sayin'.

    Serious question: do any other countries whose unit of currency is the (non-U.S.) dollar use the slang "bucks", or is that strictly an American thing?

    (Edited to add: my fault for not reloading before posting, but I'm still interested to know since the question wasn't strictly answered in the above posts.)

    Yes. New Zealand at least does, and I'm fairly sure Aussies do too. Also buckaroo and occasionally buckarooga, although that might just be my family.



  • @cconroy said:

    Serious question: do any other countries whose unit of currency is the (non-U.S.) dollar use the slang "bucks", or is that strictly an American thing?
     

    I can confirm that Australians do call their dollars bucks.



  • @cconroy said:

    Serious question: do any other countries whose unit of currency is the (non-U.S.) dollar use the slang "bucks", or is that strictly an American thing?
    Canadians do this.



  • I, being Swiss, used to be using the term "buck" for any kind of money in any currency -- and that american friend of mine got really confused because he always thought I was talking about his currency. So I stopped doing that and now I only use it for the currency of the usa.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    New rule! Let's start calling the dollar the "wheezle" just to confuse people! I bought a 8 wheezle lunch today.

    And let's also subdivide it into really weird subunits. Like, 13 flargles to the wheezle, and 21 bingles to the flargle.



  • Here in SA, our currency is the Rand, but we also call it a "buck" colloquially.



  • @The_Assimilator said:

    socket 939
     

    Har!

    That takes me back.

    @The_Assimilator said:

    at least as powerful as their home PC

    My work machine has slightly higher specs-by-numbers than my home machine, save for the videocard which is an onboard el cheapo model from Ati, but my home machine has far superior performance. I'm not entirely sure how or why.

    I prefer to keep it that way. Private nerd pride, I guess.

     

    @The_Assimilator said:

    I cannae find it now
     

    +1 cannae usage



  • @blakeyrat said:

     @blakeyrat said:
    Ok, forgive me for not being British, but what exactly is a "quid?" I hear this word all the time, and it sounds like a quantity of money, but I can't for the life of me figure out which one... is it another word for "pound?"

    Does this help?



  • @upsidedowncreature said:

    @blakeyrat said:

     @blakeyrat said:
    Ok, forgive me for not being British, but what exactly is a "quid?" I hear this word all the time, and it sounds like a quantity of money, but I can't for the life of me figure out which one... is it another word for "pound?"

    Does this help?

    Not even slightly. The very first entry assumes knowledge of "shilling" (which isn't on the list.) What the hell is a "shilling?" When I was in London back in 2001 or so, I never came across a price described in "shillings". (Then again, I never heard "quid" until recently, so.)



  • @blakeyrat said:

    What the hell is a "shilling?"
     

    Kind of in between penny and pound.



  • @http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shilling#United_Kingdom said:

    In the United Kingdom, a shilling was a coin used from the reign of Henry VII[citation needed] until decimalisation in 1971. Before decimalisation, there were 20 shillings/pound and 12 pence/shilling,
    and thus 240 pence/pound. Two coins denominated in multiple shillings
    were also in circulation at this time. They were the florin, which adopted the value of 10 new pence (10p), and the crown,
    the highest denominated non-bullion UK coin in circulation at
    decimalisation (in practice, crowns were commemorative coins not used in
    everyday transactions). At decimalisation, the shilling was superseded
    by the new 5 pence piece, which initially was of identical size and weight and had the same value, and inherited the shilling's slang name of a bob.

     



  • @b-redeker said:

    @http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shilling#United_Kingdom said:

    In the United Kingdom, a shilling was a coin used from the reign of Henry VII[citation needed] until decimalisation in 1971. Before decimalisation, there were 20 shillings/pound and 12 pence/shilling,
    and thus 240 pence/pound. Two coins denominated in multiple shillings
    were also in circulation at this time. They were the florin, which adopted the value of 10 new pence (10p), and the crown,
    the highest denominated non-bullion UK coin in circulation at
    decimalisation (in practice, crowns were commemorative coins not used in
    everyday transactions). At decimalisation, the shilling was superseded
    by the new 5 pence piece, which initially was of identical size and weight and had the same value, and inherited the shilling's slang name of a bob.

     

    Well, I see that previous link, referring to words only used before 1971, was quite relevant.

    Are you seriously telling me that in 1969, the US had a guy WALKING ON THE MOON, and you Brits were just sitting around trying to figure out how the hell much money is in your wallet? "Lessee, I have 14 of these coins and each one is worth 12 of these coins, then I have 15 of those coins but you have to divide by 240 to figure out what they're actually worth, then this big one, but it's 'non-bullion' so I guess I can't use it for my soup base-- fuck it, I'll just barter a couple of chickens, it's just easier."

    And then you guys make fun of *us* for not adopting metric? Fuck. We may not have metric, but at least our currency has made sense since 8:00 AM day one.



  • @b-redeker said:

    @http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shilling#United_Kingdom said:

    In the United Kingdom, a shilling was a coin used from the reign of Henry VII[citation needed] until decimalisation in 1971. Before decimalisation, there were 20 shillings/pound and 12 pence/shilling,
    and thus 240 pence/pound. Two coins denominated in multiple shillings
    were also in circulation at this time. They were the florin, which adopted the value of 10 new pence (10p), and the crown,
    the highest denominated non-bullion UK coin in circulation at
    decimalisation (in practice, crowns were commemorative coins not used in
    everyday transactions). At decimalisation, the shilling was superseded
    by the new 5 pence piece, which initially was of identical size and weight and had the same value, and inherited the shilling's slang name of a bob.
     

    "bob" also appears to be plural for some reason. 30 shillings == 30 bob, not 30 bobs.



  • (looks behind him to see where the Brits are Blakey is referring to)

    @blakeyrat said:

    in 1969, the US had a guy WALKING ON THE MOON

    You realise he actually wanted to go to Mars but couldn't get the amount of feet in a mile straight?



  • @b-redeker said:

    (looks behind him to see where the Brits are Blakey is referring to)

    @blakeyrat said:

    in 1969, the US had a guy WALKING ON THE MOON

    You realise he actually wanted to go to Mars but couldn't get the amount of feet in a mile straight?

    Yah, we have robots on Mars too. So do the Russians. I guess we'll see those British Mars robots any... day... now...



  • @blakeyrat said:

    at least our currency has made sense since 8:00 AM day one.

    Um... you do realise that the American colonies used British tender (and then Spanish) before the US dollar, right?

    See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_American_currency



  • @aihtdikh said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    at least our currency has made sense since 8:00 AM day one.

    Um... you do realise that the American colonies used British tender (and then Spanish) before the US dollar, right?

    See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_American_currency

    Yah but they were all commies back then, before George Washington kicked some tea-sipping commie ass with his cybernetic teeth and psychological inability to lie.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Yah but they were all commies back then, before George Washington kicked some tea-sipping commie ass with his cybernetic teeth and psychological inability to lie.
     

    This was a minor detail I didn't know yet, but you're right: as a matter of fact, George Washington even invented instant coffee.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @upsidedowncreature said:

    @blakeyrat said:

     @blakeyrat said:
    Ok, forgive me for not being British, but what exactly is a "quid?" I hear this word all the time, and it sounds like a quantity of money, but I can't for the life of me figure out which one... is it another word for "pound?"

    Does this help?

    Not even slightly. The very first entry assumes knowledge of "shilling" (which isn't on the list.) What the hell is a "shilling?" When I was in London back in 2001 or so, I never came across a price described in "shillings". (Then again, I never heard "quid" until recently, so.)

     

    It's a peppercorn. Next time you're in the grocery just go to the spices aisle. You'll see lots of Shilling Pepper.

    The Brits originally used chunks of salt for money - they got that from the occupying Roman Army and their "salary" - those all came in one-pound lumps. Then some smart person (probably a Scot) figured out that instead of carrying around all those "pounds" they could change to tiny light-weight peppercorns. MUCH more convenient.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    And then you guys make fun of us for not adopting metric? Fuck. We may not have metric, but at least our currency has made sense since 8:00 AM day one.
     

    But do you know all the units of it, as originally devised?

    10 mills = 1 cent

    10 cents = 1 dime

    10 dimes = 1 dollar

    10 dollars = 1 eagle

     



  • @dtobias said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    And then you guys make fun of us for not adopting metric? Fuck. We may not have metric, but at least our currency has made sense since 8:00 AM day one.
     

    But do you know all the units of it, as originally devised?

    10 mills = 1 cent

    10 cents = 1 dime

    10 dimes = 1 dollar

    10 dollars = 1 eagle

     

    Yes. Yes I do.



  • @dtobias said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    And then you guys make fun of us for not adopting metric? Fuck. We may not have metric, but at least our currency has made sense since 8:00 AM day one.
     

    But do you know all the units of it, as originally devised?

    10 mills = 1 cent

    10 cents = 1 dime

    10 dimes = 1 dollar

    10 dollars = 1 eagle

     

    Because, Eagles, being delicious and nutritious, are WORTH 10 dollars.

     



  • @Medezark said:

    Because, Eagles, being delicious and nutritious, are WORTH 10 dollars.
    And because it takes ten bucks to keep a large eagle fed for a year.

     



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @b-redeker said:

    @http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shilling#United_Kingdom said:

    In the United Kingdom, a shilling was a coin used from the reign of Henry VII[citation needed] until decimalisation in 1971. Before decimalisation, there were 20 shillings/pound and 12 pence/shilling,
    and thus 240 pence/pound. Two coins denominated in multiple shillings
    were also in circulation at this time. They were the florin, which adopted the value of 10 new pence (10p), and the crown,
    the highest denominated non-bullion UK coin in circulation at
    decimalisation (in practice, crowns were commemorative coins not used in
    everyday transactions). At decimalisation, the shilling was superseded
    by the new 5 pence piece, which initially was of identical size and weight and had the same value, and inherited the shilling's slang name of a bob.

     

    Well, I see that previous link, referring to words only used before 1971, was quite relevant.

    Are you seriously telling me that in 1969, the US had a guy WALKING ON THE MOON, and you Brits were just sitting around trying to figure out how the hell much money is in your wallet? "Lessee, I have 14 of these coins and each one is worth 12 of these coins, then I have 15 of those coins but you have to divide by 240 to figure out what they're actually worth, then this big one, but it's 'non-bullion' so I guess I can't use it for my soup base-- fuck it, I'll just barter a couple of chickens, it's just easier."

    And then you guys make fun of *us* for not adopting metric? Fuck. We may not have metric, but at least our currency has made sense since 8:00 AM day one.

    At least the Brits had the guts to officially and even mostly in practice going metric, as opposed to the USA, in the shady company of Burma and Liberia ...



  • @Someone You Know said:

    @b-redeker said:

    @http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shilling#United_Kingdom said:

    In the United Kingdom, a shilling was a coin used from the reign of Henry VII[citation needed] until decimalisation in 1971. Before decimalisation, there were 20 shillings/pound and 12 pence/shilling,
    and thus 240 pence/pound. Two coins denominated in multiple shillings
    were also in circulation at this time. They were the florin, which adopted the value of 10 new pence (10p), and the crown,
    the highest denominated non-bullion UK coin in circulation at
    decimalisation (in practice, crowns were commemorative coins not used in
    everyday transactions). At decimalisation, the shilling was superseded
    by the new 5 pence piece, which initially was of identical size and weight and had the same value, and inherited the shilling's slang name of a bob.
     

    "bob" also appears to be plural for some reason. 30 shillings == 30 bob, not 30 bobs.

     

    I was born in 1970 and we regularly used to refer to 50p as "ten bob" when I was growing up.  We never used "bob" in any other monetary context, e.g. we would never say "two bob", "five bob" for 10p and 25p respectively.



  • @Belcher said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    @b-redeker said:

    @http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shilling#United_Kingdom said:

    In the United Kingdom, a shilling was a coin used from the reign of Henry VII[citation needed] until decimalisation in 1971. Before decimalisation, there were 20 shillings/pound and 12 pence/shilling,
    and thus 240 pence/pound. Two coins denominated in multiple shillings
    were also in circulation at this time. They were the florin, which adopted the value of 10 new pence (10p), and the crown,
    the highest denominated non-bullion UK coin in circulation at
    decimalisation (in practice, crowns were commemorative coins not used in
    everyday transactions). At decimalisation, the shilling was superseded
    by the new 5 pence piece, which initially was of identical size and weight and had the same value, and inherited the shilling's slang name of a bob.

     

    Well, I see that previous link, referring to words only used before 1971, was quite relevant.

    Are you seriously telling me that in 1969, the US had a guy WALKING ON THE MOON, and you Brits were just sitting around trying to figure out how the hell much money is in your wallet? "Lessee, I have 14 of these coins and each one is worth 12 of these coins, then I have 15 of those coins but you have to divide by 240 to figure out what they're actually worth, then this big one, but it's 'non-bullion' so I guess I can't use it for my soup base-- fuck it, I'll just barter a couple of chickens, it's just easier."

    And then you guys make fun of *us* for not adopting metric? Fuck. We may not have metric, but at least our currency has made sense since 8:00 AM day one.

    At least the Brits had the guts to officially and even mostly in practice going metric, as opposed to the USA, in the shady company of Burma and Liberia ...

     

     

    US sticking to imperial cost lives.  When sending people to space, a US team mistranslated some European engineering work from metric to imperial.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Belcher said:

    At least the Brits had the guts to officially and even mostly in practice going metric, as opposed to the USA, in the shady company of Burma and Liberia ...
     

     

    Ah, but perhaps it's the other way around - Burma and Liberia see the truth in the American Way and you metric heathens don't.

     

    Bottom line, metric units are peculiarly sized, despite their logical consistency. Because of the lack of any non-ghetto unit between the centimeter and the meter (blah blah decimeter - do you know anybody who actually says decimeter?), all kinds of things need to be represented with either hilariously large numbers, or with fractional units. There's too much uncertainty in rounding to the nearest meter when, for example, measuring the size of a room, or a desk.  A kilometer is too small to handily measure speed of mechanized conveyances - it jumps to 3 digits just when things get interesting. Meanwhile, 100mph is sufficiently high that beneath it, you can conveniently fit most of human existence in 2 digits. A pint of beer is a damn reasonable size. Again, in metric you either have to use a ghetto-assed unit (centiliters), fractional liters, or a whole crapton of milliliters. Of course, the volumetric measurements aren't exactly all that nice, because somewhere along the line some idiot decided to change the size of stuff and make it inconsistent between countries, but the idea is there.

    The metric system is great for representing sizes handy to science. It's just fucking shitty for representing human experience without writing extra digits all over the place. As a bonus, in the human experience realm, the unit conversion difficulties are easily overcome by the fact that in normal human experience, converting units isn't an everyday task.

    Yeah, it's not all that stressful to have to write a few extra digits here and there, but it's still counterintuitive.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Helix said:

    US sticking to imperial cost lives.  When sending people to space, a US team mistranslated some European engineering work from metric to imperial.
    That was a fucking unmanned mars probe. And no, they didn't translate the numbers AT ALL. The contractor who wrote the software for the probe wrote it for US units - unlike anything else NASA uses. Metric units were properly inputted because someone didn't RTFM, and the thing promptly burnt up on reentry. Nobody. Fucking. Died.



  • @Helix said:

    US sticking to imperial cost lives.  When sending people to space, a US team mistranslated some European engineering work from metric to imperial.

    Wait, what? Are you talking about the Mars Climate Orbiter?

    You know that was a robot, right? There wasn't like a little midget inside tapping away at a telegraph key or... whatever the hell you're imagining. I mean, sure, it cost like $120 mil, but lives? No.

    Also the problem wasn't that they mistranslated it, but that they didn't translate it at all, they just plugged in the wrong units.

    Edit: Basically exactly what Weng already posted. Sorry!



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @b-redeker said:
    At decimalisation, the shilling was superseded
    by the new 5 pence piece, which initially was of identical size and weight and had the same value, and inherited the shilling's slang name of a bob.

    Well, I see that previous link, referring to words only used before 1971, was quite relevant.
    Considering that the word 'bob' to mean 5p is still in use today, I think it's safe to say that it refers to words used since 1971 as well.



    @blakeyrat said:
    And then you guys make fun of us for not adopting metric? Fuck. We may not have metric, but at least our currency has made sense since 8:00 AM day one.
    But the UK corrected the currency problem in 1971. Is the US ever going to correct the temperature and mass problems?



    And what is it with the non-imperial US pints and gallons?



  • @PJH said:

    But the UK corrected the currency problem in 1971. Is the US ever going to correct the temperature and mass problems?



    And what is it with the non-imperial US pints and gallons?

    We don't have a temperature and mass problem.

    Well, ok, we do have a mass problem, but it has to do with over-eating, not with the metric system.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Helix said:
    US sticking to imperial cost lives.  When sending people to space, a US team mistranslated some European engineering work from metric to imperial.

    Wait, what? Are you talking about the Mars Climate Orbiter?

    You know that was a robot, right? There wasn't like a little midget inside tapping away at a telegraph key or... whatever the hell you're imagining. I mean, sure, it cost like $120 mil, but lives? No.

     

    Doesn't the life of a robot matter to anyone?

     Did R2D2 get put back together?



  • @Weng said:

    Bottom line, metric units are peculiarly sized, despite their logical consistency. Because of the lack of any non-ghetto unit between the centimeter and the meter (blah blah decimeter - do you know anybody who actually says decimeter?), all kinds of things need to be represented with either hilariously large numbers, or with fractional units. There's too much uncertainty in rounding to the nearest meter when, for example, measuring the size of a room, or a desk. 

     So measure in "metric feet" -- 30 cm.  It's almost exactly the same size.

     

    A pint of beer is a damn reasonable size. Again, in metric you either have to use a ghetto-assed unit (centiliters), fractional liters, or a whole crapton of milliliters.

     The standard for measuring liquid on that scale in metric nations is the deciliter (not a "ghetto unit").  And 4.5 deciliters works out great for a pint.



  • @Cat said:

     

    A pint of beer is a damn reasonable size. Again, in metric you either have to use a ghetto-assed unit (centiliters), fractional liters, or a whole crapton of milliliters.

     The standard for measuring liquid on that scale in metric nations is the deciliter (not a "ghetto unit").  And 4.5 deciliters works out great for a pint.

     

    I'm convinced.  Next time I'm in a bar in the US I'll ask for 4.5 deciliters of beer.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Helix said:
    US sticking to imperial cost lives.  When sending people to space, a US team mistranslated some European engineering work from metric to imperial.

    Wait, what? Are you talking about the Mars Climate Orbiter?

    You know that was a robot, right? There wasn't like a little midget inside tapping away at a telegraph key or... whatever the hell you're imagining. I mean, sure, it cost like $120 mil, but lives? No.

    Also the problem wasn't that they mistranslated it, but that they didn't translate it at all, they just plugged in the wrong units.

    Edit: Basically exactly what Weng already posted. Sorry!

     

     

    Well they may tell you that, but that is far from the truth. They only tell those who have top level clearance.


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