Installation fun



  • If anyone heard a loud band around 3pm EST (US) this afternoon it was me hitting my head against my desk. I was involved with overseeing a guy installing an application on a customers machine. I didn't bang my head when I realized that he had started the installation without checking with me first (he only has some familiarity with the product, and he is not the sharpest tool in the shed), or that he didn't have the latest patches that need to be applied once the main installation is complete. And I didn't start banging my head when I was the one who noticed that the application was crashing when it started up every time.

    No. I started banging my head when I looked into the details of the machine that had been supplied to us as the target of the installation - it was an XP Pro system with only SP 2 on it and I have no doubts that the application was barfing because of the how ancient the system was as I deal almost daily with the numnuts who wrote it. Now I have to somehow get the customer to convince their corporate IT monkeys to update the system (and I wonder if we get past IE6 this time?).

    You might ask why didn't we check on the system before doing the installation? A valid question. However this project has no management and whereas anybody with half a clue could see that you perform actions A first then B followed by C, my colleague started with C, now we are attempting to do A, and hopefully we can achieve B next. So to recap: Overzealous sales guy, no real idea of requirements, no effective management, no project plan, no proper analysis of the customers systems and a deadline to meet by the end of the month to assist with the customers accounting.

    Yes - I am looking for other work



  • @OzPeter said:

    If anyone heard a loud band around 3pm EST
    Oh, I did!  I'm pretty sure it was my iPod, though.



  • @OzPeter said:

    Yes - I am looking for other work
    Soofle's tried that a few times, yet he still posts the best WTFs in the sidebar.



  • Out of curiosity, what changes has MS introduced between SP2 and SP3 for XP that would render your application slow?



  • [quote user="Renan "C#" Sousa"]Out of curiosity, what changes has MS introduced between SP2 and SP3 for XP that would render your application slow?[/quote]Its not running slow, its crashing whenever it tries to start up. Given the numnuts who wrote this program, I have a full expectation that their code does not deal gracefully with errors so that any "unusual" condition would likely crash the program.

    I'm citing the the OS being XP Pro SP2 as an unusual condition :D

    And the first thing I will get when I call tech support is "Why aren't you up to date with Windows? Call us when you are.". I run this program on XP SP3 with no issues at all and if I had known in advance what the target system was going to be, I would have asked for it to be upgraded from SP2 to SP3 prior to doing the work. Of course with the screwup that is this project I had no idea what was being installed when, until after it had started to happen.



  • @OzPeter said:

    it was an XP Pro system with only SP 2 on it and I have no doubts that the application was barfing because of the how ancient the system was as I deal almost daily with the numnuts who wrote it. Now I have to somehow get the customer to convince their corporate IT
    monkeys to update the system (and I wonder if we get past IE6 this
    time?).
     

    I feel you on this one.  For some reason my company refuses to get past XP SP2.  They are worried about possibly causing some applications to fail if we upgrade all of the PCs.  Now, we just got licenses for Visual Studio 2010, which will not work on anything older than SP3.  All of our internal employees are running IE6 still too :p  Yes, we are on the bleeding edge of technology here. 

     

    We do need a mid level J2EE developer if you want to come over and maintain our awsome Java 1.4 workflow system :p  Please send your resume to whyme@trwtf.com



  • @amischiefr said:

    We do need a mid level J2EE developer if you want to come over and maintain our awsome Java 1.4 workflow system :p  Please send your resume to whyme@trwtf.com

    Wow, we need a site of "anti-" job listings. Something where you can plug in keywords, and it says "do not apply to this position."



  • @amischiefr said:

    For some reason my company refuses to get past XP SP2.  They are worried about possibly causing some applications to fail if we upgrade all of the PCs. 
     

    Do they have to upgrade all the PCs blindly or could they upgrade one PC and see if the applications continue to work?

    Out of interest, how many apps and PCs are we talking about?



  • @RTapeLoadingError said:

    Do they have to upgrade all the PCs blindly or could they upgrade one PC and see if the applications continue to work?

    Out of interest, how many apps and PCs are we talking about?

     

    They would, of course, have a test user group that they would upgrade and ensure things worked first on those PCs before pushing to everybody.  They do that with other software, why they refuse to do it with SP2 is beyond me.

     

    Probably around 2k PCs and god only knows how many apps.  We have TONS of vendor apps that are used and probably 50 or so in house apps (although most of those are web applications, so the upgrade shouldn't affect them). 

     

    It wouldn't be a trivial thing to test all of the possible applications that we have, but it could be done.  I guess they have deemed it "not worth our time."



  • Status update

    I got around to dealing with tech support yesterday and they assured me that the product does run under XP SP2. After poking around the dead system for a bit the consensus was that they had never seen a failure like I was seeing. So they asked me to set up some logging and send them the results. While poking around I noticed that the target machine had at least 2 forms of anti-virus on it - blackice and Norton (circa 2004 I think). So now I am thinking that I am seeing interaction between the system that I am trying to install and all this crap anti-virus code.

    But that doesn't matter as while I was trying to autopsy the dead system my enthusiastic (but non too smart) colleague had spoken with the customer and they decided to try the installation on a new machine (Win 2k3 this time) - all without letting me know anything else was going on other than trying to get the original system running. So now I get to go back and sit on the sidelines and watch yet another approaching train wreck.



  • @amischiefr said:

    They would, of course, have a test user group that they would upgrade and ensure things worked first on those PCs before pushing to everybody.  They do that with other software, why they refuse to do it with SP2 is beyond me.
    Years ago I was working in a team building a C++ based product, which had to be customized for every new installation. This was one of those code bases that had no real overall design and was a pain to work with. Typically with a new installation you ended up creating a new instance of a particular style of class which involved a lot of cut and past coding. I came up with a template based solution and proudly presented it to my manager. He shot me down as soon as I said "template" with the statement that they didn't trust the implementation of templates. What I should of said at that point was "Well how the hell do you trust the implementation of the C++ compilers across all three architectures that you use?" Unfortunately I only thought of that argument several years later when it was all kind of moot.



  •  If Winston Churchill had said: @Winston Churchill said:

    I may be drunk, Miss, but in the morning I will be
    sober and you will still be ugly.

    several years later, it would not be famous.

    Just sayin'.

    (Wow, CS doesn't let you quote arbitrary text. If it can't find the text in the QUOTE tag in the original post, you get kicked out with an error. WTF!!!)

    [That's not true at all. You must've screwed up the quote block, or the rich-text editor fucked up the HTML. -bs]

    [I added a user to the quotebox. Huzzah! -dh]



  • @blakeyrat said:

    (Wow, CS doesn't let you quote arbitrary text. If it can't find the text in the QUOTE tag in the original post, you get kicked out with an error. WTF!!!)
     

     

    @little old me said:

    What do you mean? I typed this quotebox by hand.

     @blakeyrat said:

    This box was generated with a selection and the Quote button, and then fully replaced with this text.

     



  • @dhromed said:

     

     @blakeyrat said:

    This box was generated with a selection and the Quote button, and then fully replaced with this text.

    It's been scientifically proven that anything put into a quote box becomes a real quote retroactively.  For example:@dhromed said:
    I sure do love dicks!

     



  • @amischiefr said:

    It wouldn't be a trivial thing to test all of the possible applications that we have, but it could be done.  I guess they have deemed it "not worth our time."
    This is how we get people using VB3 on Win98 in the year 2009.

    It's always worth your time.



  • Well, he he, I sure do love dicks!



  • @blakeyrat said:

     If Winston Churchill had said: @Winston Churchill said:

    I may be drunk, Miss, but in the morning I will be
    sober and you will still be ugly.

    several years later, it would not be famous.

    Just sayin'.

    (Wow, CS doesn't let you quote arbitrary text. If it can't find the text in the QUOTE tag in the original post, you get kicked out with an error. WTF!!!)

    [That's not true at all. You must've screwed up the quote block, or the rich-text editor fucked up the HTML. -bs]

    [I added a user to the quotebox. Huzzah! -dh]

    Ok, then someone explain what the well-worded error "non matching quote blocks in text" means!!

    I concede I might have done something wrong, but that error sure as shit doesn't help me figure out what.

    The real point is that the acceptable delay for a snappy comeback is much less tha several years. Or even a single year.

    (written on an iPhone, so I'm sure all my tags are wrong again.)



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @blakeyrat said:

     If Winston Churchill had said: @Winston Churchill said:

    I may be drunk, Miss, but in the morning I will be
    sober and you will still be ugly.

    several years later, it would not be famous.

    Just sayin'.

    (Wow, CS doesn't let you quote arbitrary text. If it can't find the text in the QUOTE tag in the original post, you get kicked out with an error. WTF!!!)

    [That's not true at all. You must've screwed up the quote block, or the rich-text editor fucked up the HTML. -bs]

    [I added a user to the quotebox. Huzzah! -dh]

    Ok, then someone explain what the well-worded error "non matching quote blocks in text" means!!

    I concede I might have done something wrong, but that error sure as shit doesn't help me figure out what.

    The real point is that the acceptable delay for a snappy comeback is much less tha several years. Or even a single year.

    (written on an iPhone, so I'm sure all my tags are wrong again.)

     

    You probably just made a typo when spelling "quote" in the close tag.   Opening a quote tag without closing it does funny things to the preview, too. [qu[b][/b]ote]   "Non matching quote blocks in post"  It accepts it in the preview, but not in the post.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Ok, then someone explain what the well-worded error "non matching quote blocks in text" means!!

    I concede I might have done something wrong, but that error sure as shit doesn't help me figure out what.

    It means it can't pair up the quote opening and closing tags properly.  Most likely because you've misspelled one or the other, or you didn't put the user in quotes.



  • TRWTF is that you assumed that CS actually scans previous posts for the accuracy of the quotation.@blakeyrat said:

    I am TRWTF.
    Don't feel bad, it happens to all of us sooner or later.



  • @Xyro said:

    TRWTF is that you assumed that CS actually scans previous posts for the accuracy of the quotation.@blakeyrat said:

    I am TRWTF.
    Don't feel bad, it happens to all of us sooner or later.

    That's what the error implied was wrong. I didn't write the error message, I just read it.

    Edit: I'm going with the "typo" theory on this one. But since I don't have a time machine to look back at what I typed, the world will never know!



  • @blakeyrat said:

    But since I don't have a time machine to look back at what I typed, the world will never know!
    False assumption there. Just because you don't have a time machine doesn't mean that nobody else has a time machine



  • @OzPeter said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    But since I don't have a time machine to look back at what I typed, the world will never know!
    False assumption there. Just because you don't have a time machine doesn't mean that nobody else has a time machine
    Furthermore, just because you don't have a time machine [right now], doesn't mean you won't have one in your past from the future in an adjacent bifurcated semistable causality loop.  In fact, I just used my own time machine to check what you did wrong with the quotes and then told my recent past self to correctly suggest it was a typo.  (Previously, I had some semicoherent ramble about XSS and SQL injection prevention by CS.)  You know, I think I'll go back again and personally ask the folks who wrote CS to make it suck less.  I mean, having to type in the post in under 30 seconds and then correctly guess which one of the three Post buttons to click? I think that feature can be removed. Wish me luck!



  • @Xyro said:

    You know, I think I'll go back again and personally ask the folks who wrote CS to make it suck less.  I mean, having to type in the post in under 30 seconds and then correctly guess which one of the three Post buttons to click? I think that feature can be removed. Wish me luck!

    The trouble is that while you may go back with your time machine and fix CS to be the perfect piece of software, won't that just mean that only the people in the parallel time line get to see the good stuff, while we (who have seen this version of CS) only get to see what we have already seen?



  • @OzPeter said:

    @Xyro said:
    You know, I think I'll go back again and personally ask the folks who wrote CS to make it suck less.  I mean, having to type in the post in under 30 seconds and then correctly guess which one of the three Post buttons to click? I think that feature can be removed. Wish me luck!
    The trouble is that while you may go back with your time machine and fix CS to be the perfect piece of software, won't that just mean that only the people in the parallel time line get to see the good stuff, while we (who have seen this version of CS) only get to see what we have already seen?
    No no, you would have no knowledge of the suckier version, as your past never included it (because it never existed now).  However, as the time traveler, I would have knowledge of what horrors could have been (since it existed in my personal past), but may still enjoy the single-Post-button version after I traveled back into a more familiar time that I like to refer to as the present.  The three-Post-button version of events has now been wiped from history.   ...  Although now there appears to be a giant oil spill geyser off the Gulf.  wtf.



  • @OzPeter said:

    @Xyro said:
    You know, I think I'll go back again and personally ask the folks who wrote CS to make it suck less.  I mean, having to type in the post in under 30 seconds and then correctly guess which one of the three Post buttons to click? I think that feature can be removed. Wish me luck!
    The trouble is that while you may go back with your time machine and fix CS to be the perfect piece of software, won't that just mean that only the people in the parallel time line get to see the good stuff, while we (who have seen this version of CS) only get to see what we have already seen?

    With talk like that, you're just asking for him to kill your grandfather or shoot him in the balls.



  • @OzPeter said:

    @Xyro said:
    You know, I think I'll go back again and personally ask the folks who wrote CS to make it suck less.  I mean, having to type in the post in under 30 seconds and then correctly guess which one of the three Post buttons to click? I think that feature can be removed. Wish me luck!

    The trouble is that while you may go back with your time machine and fix CS to be the perfect piece of software, won't that just mean that only the people in the parallel time line get to see the good stuff, while we (who have seen this version of CS) only get to see what we have already seen?

    I'm not a huge fan of Orson Scott Card, but I like his book "The Redemption of Christopher Columbus." The plot was basically that the future was in an ecological crisis (as in all terrible sci-fi books), but humanity had invented a device that could look into the past. In the course of studying Columbus, specifically the question of "why did he sail west into nothingness instead of east to where valuable stuff was known to exist?" the machine shows that a literal angel told him to sail west-- further research revealed it wasn't an angel, but a holographic projection sent to him from an alternate future, presumably even worse than their present.

    Anyway, once they learn that it's possible to send stuff back in time they come up with a plan to "fix" things in the past by, among other things, immunizing North Americans against European diseases, encouraging Mayan metallurgy development ahead of contact with Europeans, and dynamiting Columbus' ships so that he would have to rely on the natives to get back home. Interesting read. Ends with the alternate history having radios and satellites and such in like the mid-18th century. (Although the book doesn't discuss whether the ecological disaster still happened or not-- they might have just accelerated it by a few centuries! Heh.)

    Of course, more recent work shows that Columbus potentially had been tipped off to land to the west by rumors from the Vikings who landed in North America.



  • In fact, the technology that enabled the "angel" was from Forever, who will have given it to mankind in visions and waking dreams. Scientists then will used it to send a telepathic signal into the past to avert a technological apocalypse in 2085. This signal is first received by a blind minstrel named Ayreon back sometime in the dark ages. To our own doom, he was dismissed and ostracized as a heretic or witch or something and was finally killed by Merlin the Sorcerer.  But then Merlin started receiving the future signal.  This has continued down a line of soothsayers and messengers, and is presently working within the mind of Arjen A. Lucassen...   Yet if the signal continues, then the future has not been changed.....



  • @blakeyrat said:

    I'm not a huge fan of Orson Scott Card, but I like his book "The Redemption of Christopher Columbus." The plot was basically that the future was in an ecological crisis (as in all terrible sci-fi books), but humanity had invented a device that could look into the past. In the course of studying Columbus, specifically the question of "why did he sail west into nothingness instead of east to where valuable stuff was known to exist?" the machine shows that a literal angel told him to sail west-- further research revealed it wasn't an angel, but a holographic projection sent to him from an alternate future, presumably even worse than their present.
    I've read that book (and back when I remember it simply being called "pastwatch" - although my memory may be playing tricks on me. To me the gist of the book was that sending "something" into the past split off a timestream at that point and created a parallel stream with new consequences. The same plot device is used in David Weber's "The Appocalypse Troll" wherein humans from the future come back to stop aliens from the future destroying the human race. Personally I wish he had devoted some time to creating a sequel to that book as it ends with the alien task force being destroyed, but the humans are still expecting the first contact from aliens of their time in another 70 or so years. That would have been an interesting story.@blakeyrat said:
    encouraging Mayan metallurgy development ahead of contact with Europeans
    You should read Jared Diamond's "Guns, Germs and Steel" which is touted as a history of why westerners got all the good stuff in the world. Apparently sub-saharan africans were ahead of Europeans in metallurgy at some point around the dark ages. But Jared's premise was that the North-South orientation of Africa wasn't as conducive to trade as the East-West layout of Europe, so that trade in Africa was stifled compared to Europe.



  • @OzPeter said:

    I've read that book (and back when I remember it simply being called "pastwatch" - although my memory may be playing tricks on me.

    Now that you mention it, it might have been "Pastwatch: The Redemption blah." I had the book printed after Card hit the big time, so the title might have changed. The agency the researchers worked for was indeed called Pastwatch, though.

    Don't get me wrong, I still think Card is an uncreative lucky hack. But even a hack has a good novel now and then. (See also: Whitley Screiber's War Day. Yes, the insane UFO guy wrote a really good genuine sci-fi novel at one point.)

    And even Pastwatch has some weird parts. Like the naked future Mayan guy, what was his deal? Put on pants, Christ!

    @OzPeter said:

    To me the gist of the book was that sending "something" into the past split off a timestream at that point and created a parallel stream with new consequences.

    In that book it wasn't parallel, or at least they didn't think it was. They spoke and acted as if the nanosecond the machine activates, everybody on Earth ceases to exist. Then again, maybe they had it wrong and the world continued as normal (just spawning a different parallel world.)

    One of the minor plot points was that they had to do a world-wide election to determine whether they should go forward, since activating the machine would mean the "death" of everybody on earth. But, then again, because of the vague ecological disaster they were all going to die of starvation sooner or later anyway.

    @OzPeter said:

    You should read Jared Diamond's "Guns, Germs and Steel"

    What makes you think I haven't?

    Maybe YOU should read Collapse! So nyah!



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @OzPeter said:
    You should read Jared Diamond's "Guns, Germs and Steel"

    What makes you think I haven't?

    Maybe YOU should read Collapse! So nyah!

    And what makes you think I haven't? (Or have you been peering on my bookshelf and seen that I have been halfway through it for about the last 6 years)

    And maybe you should read "The Third Chimpanzee" .. nyah nyah nyah
    Although I will have to admit that while it looks good on my bookshelf I haven't opened it yet



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Put on pants, Christ!
    GET THE FUCK OUT!



  • @Xyro said:

    The three-Post-button version of events has now been wiped from history.   ...  Although now there appears to be a giant oil spill geyser off the Gulf.  wtf.
    At least you convinced them to get rid of that feature where a boot popped out of the computer and stomped on your crotch when you hit backspace.  Now it just deletes two characters sometimes.  The destruction of an ecosystem is a small price to pay for going from a literal to figurative kick in the nuts.



  • @bstorer said:

    @Xyro said:
    The three-Post-button version of events has now been wiped from history.   ...  Although now there appears to be a giant oil spill geyser off the Gulf.  wtf.
    At least you convinced them to get rid of that feature where a boot popped out of the computer and stomped on your crotch when you hit backspace.  Now it just deletes two characters sometimes.  The destruction of an ecosystem is a small price to pay for going from a literal to figurative kick in the nuts.
    What? I have no memory of the boot feature. You must be mad.

    Oh, that reminds me, I'm going to go back one more time and see if the backspace issue can be sorted out. (Hopefully while I'm messing around with the past, I can get BP to clean up the oil faster than a whole week...) I'll be sure to ask the developers to not think about any plans they may have for such a crotchstomper.



  • @OzPeter said:

    Although I will have to admit that while it looks good on my bookshelf I haven't opened it yet

    Only if you have the hardcover!

    (But seriously, read it.)



  • @pstorer said:

    Also in this timeline Barrack Obama isn't Kenyan. WTF?

    Well, at least quintuple-PhD Joe Biden--the world's smartest scientist and the only man to win the Nobel Prize in every discipline 5 years running--is still Vice President.  We'd really be fucked without him!

     

    ... Did somebody just hear a loud zapping noise in the direction of Delaware?



  • @Xyro said:

    (Hopefully while I'm messing around with the past, I can get BP to clean up the oil faster than a whole week...)

    Shit, it took 3 weeks this time.  I think you're really fucking up the timestream here.  All that precious, precious crude--lost...  Well, at least we still have the 1 trillion barrels of oil reserves we stole from the Iraqis when we pulled out of that shithole in early 2004.  That should keep the price of gas under 25 cents a gallon, hopefully.





  • @dhromed said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Don't second-guess a man who is capable of utterly decimating
    your grandfather's testicles.
     

    Every tenth testicle must go!

    Or one-tenth of every single testicle, which is far worse as it leaves no testicle capable of performing its primary functions of producing grandchildren and being lovingly dipped into BTK's expectant, salivating maw.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    Well, at least we still have the 1 trillion barrels of oil reserves we stole from the Iraqis when we pulled out of that shithole in early 2004.  That should keep the price of gas under 25 cents a gallon, hopefully.
      You know, like most people I though Ralph Nader's 2003 coup would doom our country.  Sure, the live video feed of him engaging in unarmed combat against the superhuman Dick Cheney on the National Mall for control of the country was riveting (though it started to drag a bit in the second week until Cheney pulled that stilletto hidden in his shoe), I just didn't see how he could hope to bring accountability back to Washington.  But I'm a big enough man to admit when I'm wrong; sucking the oil wells of Iraq dry and nuking it until it collapsed into a sinkhole of glowing rubble was an inspired solution that has brought us peace and adoration around the world.



  • @bstorer said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Well, at least we still have the 1 trillion barrels of oil reserves we stole from the Iraqis when we pulled out of that shithole in early 2004.  That should keep the price of gas under 25 cents a gallon, hopefully.
      You know, like most people I though Ralph Nader's 2003 coup would doom our country.  Sure, the live video feed of him engaging in unarmed combat against the superhuman Dick Cheney on the National Mall for control of the country was riveting (though it started to drag a bit in the second week until Cheney pulled that stilletto hidden in his shoe), I just didn't see how he could hope to bring accountability back to Washington.  But I'm a big enough man to admit when I'm wrong; sucking the oil wells of Iraq dry and nuking it until it collapsed into a sinkhole of glowing rubble was an inspired solution that has brought us peace and adoration around the world.

    I'm man enough to accept your apology for doubting my support of Supreme Allied Commandant Ralph Nader.  You must admit it was inspired, his decision to kill Michael Moore and convert his bloated corpse into C-rations for distribution to the world's poor, ending famine in third-world countries once and for all.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @dhromed said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Don't second-guess a man who is capable of utterly decimating
    your grandfather's testicles.
     

    Every tenth testicle must go!

    Or one-tenth of every single testicle, which is far worse as it leaves no testicle capable of performing its primary functions of producing grandchildren and being lovingly dipped into BTK's expectant, salivating maw.

    Careful with that, some compilers will optimize to simply castrating every 20th grandfather.



  • @bstorer said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @dhromed said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Don't second-guess a man who is capable of utterly decimating
    your grandfather's testicles.
     

    Every tenth testicle must go!

    Or one-tenth of every single testicle, which is far worse as it leaves no testicle capable of performing its primary functions of producing grandchildren and being lovingly dipped into BTK's expectant, salivating maw.

    Careful with that, some compilers will optimize to simply castrating every 20th grandfather.

    Well, that explains KDE 4.0 and its almost-feminine love of shiny eye candy.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    I'm man enough to accept your apology for doubting my support of Supreme Allied Commandant Ralph Nader.  You must admit it was inspired, his decision to kill Michael Moore and convert his bloated corpse into C-rations for distribution to the world's poor, ending famine in third-world countries once and for all.
    I was strongly in favor of this, to be honest, but I figured it was one of those typical coup promises that are forgotten the second they grasp the nation in their iron fist.  Nutjob conspiracy theories, reductionist arguments, and pandering to the fringe have no place in movies, damnit.  That's what talk radio and 24-hour news networks are for.

    But I do find it a bit suspicious that only a week before BP's minor accident (I'm not sure how to refer to it; did FEMA ever publicly state whether it ranked as an oopsie or a full-scale oopsie-daisy?) that Nader bought up the world's supply of dish soap and charged BP exorbitant amounts for it.  It just seems a little fishy that he bought it for $3 dollars a bottle and sold it for over $80 dollars an ounce two weeks later.  How convenient...  On a related note, I hope those rumors about Nader's powers are exaggerated.  I mean, there's no way he could choke the life out of remotely, amiri-- augh!  choking He... knows choking Xyro... you must go back choking warn me not to question Lord Nader choking ...vision fading... thud



  • @bstorer said:

    Nutjob conspiracy theories, reductionist arguments, and pandering to the fringe have no place in movies, damnit.  That's what talk radio and 24-hour news networks are for.

    Don't forget blogs, the poorly-mimeographed Marxist/LaRouchian/Bircher newsletters of the 21st century!

     

    @bstorer said:

    On a related note, I hope those rumors about Nader's powers are exaggerated.  I mean, there's no way he could choke the life out of remotely, amiri-- augh!  choking He... knows choking Xyro... you must go back choking warn me not to question Lord Nader choking ...vision fading... thud

    There's no hope for poor pstorer now...  Lord Nader has been safely ensconced in his Gotham hideout atop the stately World Trade Center for over a decade!  Nothing could dislodge him!



  • @Fry said:

    On that corner, some guy with a bushy beard handed out a socialist newsletter.

    @Bender said:
    Was it poorly Xeroxed?

    @Fry said:
    You better believe it!



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @bstorer said:

    Nutjob conspiracy theories, reductionist arguments, and pandering to the fringe have no place in movies, damnit.  That's what talk radio and 24-hour news networks are for.

    Don't forget blogs, the poorly-mimeographed Marxist/LaRouchian/Bircher newsletters of the 21st century!

    I thought that was YouTube.  In my timeline blogs are glorious forums for reasonable discourse leading to actual results.  This alternate future is extremely confusing to me.  Is xkcd still funny at least?



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Fry said:
    On that corner, some guy with a bushy beard handed out a socialist newsletter.

    @Bender said:
    Was it poorly Xeroxed?

    @Fry said:
    You better believe it!

    Xerox is an imperialist tool for oppressing the proletariat.  The mimeograph is the printing device of The People!



  • @bstorer said:

    Is xkcd still funny at least?

    Extremely so.  It is beloved across the nation and reprinted in every magazine, newspaper and even on the packaging of fast food restaurants.  There were still some fans who felt it wasn't appreciated enough by the rest of the populace, so they turned they abandoned the society that they felt had betrayed them.  Seeking refuge in the forests, they eventually turned to terrorism, launching an all-out guerrilla war against the population of the United States, complete with suicide bombings, videotaped beheadings and assassinations of teachers, bureaucrats and village/city chiefs.

     

    Their struggle was successful, resulting in a cease-fire with the US government containing humiliating conditions such as the ceding of all of California to the rebels, as well as the replacement of the US Constitution with that one strip about alcoholic programmers and Steve Ballmer.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @bstorer said:

    Is xkcd still funny at least?

    Extremely so.  It is beloved across the nation and reprinted in every magazine, newspaper and even on the packaging of fast food restaurants.  There were still some fans who felt it wasn't appreciated enough by the rest of the populace, so they turned they abandoned the society that they felt had betrayed them.  Seeking refuge in the forests, they eventually turned to terrorism, launching an all-out guerrilla war against the population of the United States, complete with suicide bombings, videotaped beheadings and assassinations of teachers, bureaucrats and village/city chiefs.

     

    Their struggle was successful, resulting in a cease-fire with the US government containing humiliating conditions such as the ceding of all of California to the rebels, as well as the replacement of the US Constitution with that one strip about alcoholic programmers and Steve Ballmer.

    Yeah, that's a good start, I guess.  But you guys don't even communicate solely by referencing specific xkcd comics.  We just say the number of an xkcd comic which expresses the point we're trying to get across.  Most of communication is about mathematical theorems, nostalgia for the early '90s, ham-fisted attempts at poignancy, and incredibly maudlin sentimentality.  To be honest, humanity was pretty much doomed from the point where we voted the Ron Paul/MC Hammer ticket into office on an anti-raptor, pro-"me too"-humor platform.


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