StackOverflow ad



  • Saw this ad on stackoverflow.  I'm not familiar with this particular phrase:

    Kiss goodbye to SQL Management Studiohttp://ads.stackoverflow.com/ads/1/LINQPad01.png

     



  •  I don't know what part of the ad is confusing you. Here's a screenshot of SQL Management Studio, if that's the problem:

     

    I'll leave looking up LINQ as an exercise for the reader, but it's not much of a stretch for someone to make a query tool based on it. Whether a "modern query language" provides any advantage over T-SQL, I'm pretty dubious, but eh.



  •  It's like "kiss your ass goodbye."  Kiss goodbye to the old way of doing things.  What's not to get?



  • It probably should be "Kiss SQL Management Studio goodbye" or "Say “goodbye” to SQL Management Studio".



  • @bstorer said:

     It's like "kiss your ass goodbye."  Kiss goodbye to the old way of doing things.  What's not to get?

    Yes, but "Kiss goodbye to X" is not a common phrasing in English.  It sounds incredibly weird.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Whether a "modern query language" provides any advantage over T-SQL, I'm pretty dubious, but eh.

     

    Let's look at the example from their main page:

     

    from p in Products
    let spanishOrders = p.OrderDetails.Where (o => o.Order.ShipCountry == "Spain")
    where spanishOrders.Any()
    orderby p.Category.CategoryName, p.ProductName
    group new
    {
      p.ProductName,
      Orders = spanishOrders.Count(),
      TotalValue = spanishOrders.Sum (o => o.UnitPrice * o.Quantity),
      spanishOrders
    }
    by p.Category.CategoryName

    which outputs a key/value list where the values are tables.  SQL can't output that, but here's something pretty close:

    select c.CategoryName,
    p.ProductName,
    count(*) Orders,
    sum(od.UnitPrice * od.Quantity) TotalValue
    from OrderDetails od
      join Orders o on od.OrderKey = o.OrderKey
      join Products p on od.ProductKey = p.ProductKey
      join Categories c on p.CategoryKey = c.CategoryKey
    where o.ShipCountry = "Spain"
    group by c.CategoryName, p.ProductName
    order by c.CategoryName, p.ProductName

     

    So we shove the join logic under the covers (as long as the joins follow the "Foo join Bar on Foo.BarKey = Bar.BarKey" pattern, which in my practical experience they usually do but not always), but in return we're saddled with some (AFAICT) pointless "a => a.something" syntax, and the cognitive dissonance (if you're used to SQL) of having the SELECT at the bottom instead of the top.  Meh.

     

    This sub-page does a better job of explaining, though it should really be titled "Why LINQ beats SQL in certain specific contexts".

     



  •  

    some (AFAICT) pointless "a => a.something" syntax,

     That would be C#'s way of implementing lambda functions.



  • Not really seeing how this would be beneficial over T-SQL since LINQ is basically middleware over a bunch of different data storage technologies and therefore more generalized and less tuned to operating over an SQL database than T-SQL would be?



  • TRWTF is how you (or CS?) managed to botch the image.

    Image

    Link for AdBlock users



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    Yes, but "Kiss goodbye to X" is not a common phrasing in English.  It sounds incredibly weird.

    Not that weird.



  • @dabean said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Yes, but "Kiss goodbye to X" is not a common phrasing in English.  It sounds incredibly weird.

    Not that weird.

     

    Strange. I'm familiar with the common phrase "Kiss X goodbye", but I have to agree that "Kiss goodbye to X" sounds, well, just odd.

    It sounds like misuse of the original phrase that's become common, like grocer quotes, the idiotic "could care less" instead of "couldn't care less" (by people who don't understand sarcasm), and "irregardless". It's not as plainly fucked up, but it just has the feel of a common English colloquialism that's been translated out of English and back. Technically the meaning is the same, but it doesn't have the same ring to it.



  • You people and your adblock make me sad.



  • Is it just me or does Adblock internally swap alt text and href if it detects an ad? Wouldn't that be incredibly stupid as well as easy to pass by?

    In before Adblock good vs. bad flamewar



  • @drinkingbird said:

    It sounds like misuse of the original phrase that's become common, like grocer quotes, the idiotic "could care less" instead of "couldn't care less" (by people who don't understand sarcasm), and "irregardless". It's not as plainly fucked up, but it just has the feel of a common English colloquialism that's been translated out of English and back. Technically the meaning is the same, but it doesn't have the same ring to it.
    Irregardless, I could care less what you think.  Kiss goodbye to your antiqutated idea's of how English should work.



  • @dabean said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Yes, but "Kiss goodbye to X" is not a common phrasing in English.  It sounds incredibly weird.

    Not that weird.

     

    I noticed that those are mainlly UK sites.  Maybe "Kiss Goodbye to.." is the British version?

     

    @drinkingbird said:

    It sounds like misuse of the original phrase that's become common, like grocer quotes, the idiotic "could care less" instead of "couldn't care less" (by people who don't understand sarcasm), and "irregardless".

    "Could care less" is not idiotic, at least not the way I learned it and use it.  The original phrase was "I COULD care less, but I'd have to try really fucking hard."  As for not understanding sarcasm, I think maybe the pot is calling the kettle black.  Their is nothing sarcastic about saying "I couldn't care less" when you really couldn't care less.  Saying, "Wow, that's fascinating!!!" when you couldn't care less is sarcastic.



  • @bstorer said:

    Irregardless, I could care less what you think.  Kiss goodbye to your antiqutated idea's of how English should work.

    You have no chance to survive make your time.



  • @Dudehole said:

    Not really seeing how this would be beneficial over T-SQL since LINQ is basically middleware over a bunch of different data storage technologies and therefore more generalized and less tuned to operating over an SQL database than T-SQL would be?

    That would be nice.  Unfortunately LINQ only works against SQL Server at this point (called LINQ-to-SQL).  LINQ also works for in-memory objects, which is where I use it extensively.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    You have no chance to survive make your time.

    Wow, especially considering Morbs said this, my response has to be:

    What you say?!



  • @campkev said:

    "Could care less" is not idiotic, at least not the way I learned it and use it.  The original phrase was "I COULD care less, but I'd have to try really fucking hard."

    The former is not the latter. The former is idiotic. The latter is not.

    And "I couldn't care less" isn't intended to be sarcastic, it's intended to be a statement of fact.



  • @derula said:

    Is it just me or does Adblock internally swap alt text and href if it detects an ad? Wouldn't that be incredibly stupid as well as easy to pass by?
    LET'S FIND OUT!

    http://ads.stackoverflow.com/ads/1/LINQPad01.png

    Looks like no.



  • @Zylon said:

    @campkev said:

    "Could care less" is not idiotic, at least not the way I learned it and use it.  The original phrase was "I COULD care less, but I'd have to try really fucking hard."

    The former is not the latter. The former is idiotic. The latter is not.

    And "I couldn't care less" isn't intended to be sarcastic, it's intended to be a statement of fact.

     

    However, "I COULD care less..." (emphasis indicated by uppercase letters), leaving the second part of the sentence implicit, is the proper way to pronounce it and, in my opinion, not idiotic.

    On the other hand, spoken without proper emphasis or written without ellipsis, I have to agree that it is idiotic.



  • @Ilya Ehrenburg said:

    @Zylon said:

    @campkev said:

    "Could care less" is not idiotic, at least not the way I learned it and use it.  The original phrase was "I COULD care less, but I'd have to try really fucking hard."

    The former is not the latter. The former is idiotic. The latter is not.

    And "I couldn't care less" isn't intended to be sarcastic, it's intended to be a statement of fact.

     

    However, "I COULD care less..." (emphasis indicated by uppercase letters), leaving the second part of the sentence implicit, is the proper way to pronounce it and, in my opinion, not idiotic.

    On the other hand, spoken without proper emphasis or written without ellipsis, I have to agree that it is idiotic.


    QFT



  • @lolwtf said:

    LET'S FIND OUT!

    [possible image]

    Looks like no.

    Okay, I got it now:

    @campkev said:

    <img height="250" alt="Kiss goodbye to SQL Management Studio" src="http://ads.stackoverflow.com/ads/1/LINQPad01.png" width="220" align="top" border="0" />

    <img height="1" alt="http://ads.stackoverflow.com/ads/1/LINQPad01.png" src="http://forums.thedailywtf.com/forums/Kiss Goodbye To Sql Management Studio" width="1" border="0" />


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