Google requires Internet Explorer



  • This page states (translated from Danish):

     

    To search using Google (requires Internet Explorer), click here: [Google link]



  •  Here's the google translate link (requires internet explorer).

    I think it's just a stupid translater/text writer who confused "internet explorer" with "browser" (or internet) (quite a lot of people do, especially since Windows XP puts internet explorer under "Internet" in the start menu by default).

    Still, if that was the case, how could the person think anyone who didn't have a browser/internet explorer would see the link?



  • Why doesn't Google work in IE 8, then? 😉



  • @benryves said:

    Why doesn't Google work in IE 8, then? 😉

    I know you're joking, but my guess would be because Google isn't standards-compliant and IE8 is an extreme stickler for standards. 



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @benryves said:

    Why doesn't Google work in IE 8, then? 😉

    I know you're joking, but my guess would be because Google isn't standards-compliant and IE8 is an extreme stickler for standards. 

     

    Don't think that could be, because I believe as soon as IE 8 finds a malformed page (or a page with a old, transistional or wrong doctype or no doctype at all) it triggers back into good 'll standards complaints mode ("quirks mode")



  • @dtech said:

    Don't think
    that could be, because I believe as soon as IE 8 finds a malformed page
    (or a page with a old, transistional or wrong doctype or no doctype at
    all) it triggers back into good 'll standards complaints mode ("quirks
    mode")

    				                    <p>Someone should smack you over the head with a rolled up newspaper. Bad dtech, NO! </p>


  •  I like it when you have a tiny piece of malformed HTML (like, say I forgot to close a ul tag), IE7 auto-redirects you to an error page that clears out the DOM so you can't even view source to see what went wrong.  Yeah, that's awesome.



  • I don't know about HTML, but at least the XML "error page" isn't really there; right-clicking view source still shows the original page's source.



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

    I like it when you have a tiny piece of malformed HTML (like, say I forgot to close a ul tag), IE7 auto-redirects you to an error page that clears out the DOM so you can't even view source to see what went wrong.  Yeah, that's awesome.

    Reading what Dorsett said, is this perhaps the XML error page for an invalid XHMTL doc?  Because that's what FF does as well with invalid XML and it always annoyed me.

     

    As a side note, does anyone know if IE8 will default to HTML rendering for XHTML served with HTML headers?  If not, a lot of sites are going to break.  If so, I can continue making fun of people who use XHTML. 



  • @dtech said:

    Don't think that could be, because I believe as soon as IE 8 finds a malformed page (or a page with a old, transistional or wrong doctype or no doctype at all) it triggers back into good 'll standards complaints mode ("quirks mode")

    Quirks mode (equivalent to IE5) is triggered when there's no DOCTYPE (or it's on a special list of very old or incomplete DOCTYPEs - see Wikipedia) in the beginning of the document (in IE7 and later, an XML prolog is allowed before the doctype without triggering quirks mode, but this doesn't apply to IE6). If there is a DOCTYPE, it'll trigger standards-compliant rendering. It's your job to make sure that if you say a site is standards-compliant, then it's true; if it's not, IE will simply do the best it can with what it's got, but still observe CSS standards (as best as it knows, of course). It's been like this for ages (IE6), and other browsers use the same way of detecting when to activate their quirks mode (yes, other browsers have quirks modes too, although they're obviously not the same as what IE has).

    @vt_mruhlin said:

    I like it when you have a tiny piece of malformed HTML (like, say I forgot to close a ul tag), IE7 auto-redirects you to an error page that clears out the DOM so you can't even view source to see what went wrong.  Yeah, that's awesome.

    Then you're using XML (and sending it with an XML MIME type), and that's *supposed* to happen - if you don't want that, then don't use XML. IE never bombs out with just invalid HTML (though pre-IE8, certain DOM manipulations performed at the wrong time could cause it to bomb out with an "Operation aborted", aborting page load, but that's really a different issue)

    @morbiuswilters said:

    As a side note, does anyone know if IE8 will default to HTML rendering for XHTML served with HTML headers?  If not, a lot of sites are going to break.  If so, I can continue making fun of people who use XHTML. 

    IIRC, they haven't announced any change in XHTML handling at all, so it should be no different from IE7.



  •  

    @Pidgeot said:

    If there is a DOCTYPE, it'll trigger standards-compliant rendering.

    Not necessarily. There's a whole range of doctypes both new and old that will force both IE and FF into quirks mode.



  • @Becky said:

    Not necessarily. There's a whole range of doctypes both new and old that will force both IE and FF into quirks mode.

    Hence the "or it's on a special list of very old or incomplete DOCTYPEs" part of the previous sentence.



  •  @vt_mruhlin said:

     I like it when you have a tiny piece of malformed HTML (like, say I forgot to close a ul tag), IE7 auto-redirects you to an error page that clears out the DOM so you can't even view source to see what went wrong.  Yeah, that's awesome.

    My favourite IE6/7 bug is this one. I've seen that error come up too many times to mention (our app makes quite heavy use of JavaScript). The error message is incredibly unhelpful, and blocks you from doing anything (particularly anything which might actually help clear the error). Doh!



  • @Translated page said:

    To make a search through Google (requires Internet Explorer), click here: Shingles

    The real WTF is that Google thinks it's called differently in different contries. 


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