Review WTF



  • I'll let you read it:

    http://digg.com/apple/Mac_Rant_3

     


  •  Why didn't you link directly to the article?

    Oh, I see, you trying to get attention on Digg.

      



  • How about giving us some context... do you agree with the article?

    This is just a waste of time.

     



  • @Jonathan Holland said:

     Why didn't you link directly to the article?

    Why didn't you?



  •  Look, I found something that is even dumber: http://bozzie.org/blog/wordpress/?p=7

     



  • Cookie-shaped dough !

    Damn, school is hard in those days. 



  • This one is stupid too:



  • @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    How about giving us some context... do you agree with the article?

    This is just a waste of time.  

     

    Summary of the article:

    "Mac & os X ain't what I know and I ain't smart 'nuff to learn sumthin diff'ernt."




  • @dphunct said:

    Summary of the article:

    "Mac & os X ain't what I know and I ain't smart 'nuff to learn sumthin diff'ernt."

     

    That about sums up most MS bashes as well.



  • @savar said:

    This one is stupid too:

     

     Heellllllllllllllp, I'm stuck in an infinite loop now.



    • AAC sounds like shit, and so does mp3.
      • AAC sounds more like your listening to music at a dance club. Way to much treble and bass not enough mid range sounds. You really have no other choice in codec’s. So your pretty much screwed.

    I wonder on what basis he thinks wma (or whatever) is better?  IANA sound technician, but I think that has more to do with your speakers and stereo than the compression codec. 

    The background gets jumbled in firefox when I scroll.  it "flashes" cuz it's too intricate.

    This blog is evidence that anyone (even a 13 year old) can get their own site on the internet say just about anything they want. 

     



  • So as long as we're 'talking' about Macs... I have a few WTFs:

    <conversation rescue=yes attempt=desperate hope=little>

    I just got an iMac, and quickly learned the whole "Macs just work" thing was BS. The thing slows down to a crawl a lot for no good reason. I've had a few programs crash already. And Apple wanted me to pay $15 for a printscreen app from their website (??). I did find how to do it for free, though.

    Installing and using the developer tools was... different. I just wanted gcc but found it only comes in a 1.1GB package with apparently everything under the sun in it. At least I figured out all the hoops to jump through to get it to work.

    And then there's GarageBand. The real reason I got an iMac. I have to admit, GarageBand is the best program I've used like it. But it has its problems. Hint: you'd better save often because the fastest, smoothest operation in GarageBand is crashing without a trace. And don't even try to use the mouse to move notes around. And don't expect that just because you could click-drag that slider a minute ago, it will work the same now. No, now it only works by clicking to the left or right of it, arbitrarily. And don't expect that dragging a box around something will actually select it. No, that only works 1 out of every 3 tries. Just to keep you on your toes. And you want to delete a note? Well I hope you have 3-4 minutes because deleting one single note can take longer than outputting a final mix of the entire song.

    Am I just unlucky? Is my iMac brokened? If it just worked like it's supposed to it would maybe even be worth the exorbitant price.

    </conversation> 



  • @superjer said:

    Am I just unlucky? Is my iMac brokened?

    Yes.

     

    Now,

    Good luck at the genius bar.  



  • @dphunct said:

    Summary of the article:

    "Mac & os X ain't what I know and I ain't smart 'nuff to learn sumthin diff'ernt."

     

    Some good points and some crappy in the rant, but overall that's a good summary.



  • @Lingerance said:

    @Jonathan Holland said:
     Why didn't you link directly to the article?

    Why didn't you?
     

     

    Links are hard. 



  • @shadowman said:

    @savar said:

    This one is stupid too:

     

     Heellllllllllllllp, I'm stuck in an infinite loop now.

     

    And each iteration makes you dumber and dumber... 



  • @TheRider said:

    And each iteration makes you dumber and dumber... 

    So THAT is what happened to SpectateSwamp!



  • @superjer said:

    The thing slows down to a crawl a lot for no good reason.

    Have you tried running Activity Monitor in the background to see what's going on when things slow down? (Or opening a Terminal window with "top -n 5 -o cpu -s 3"?) That should tell you what's slowing things down, although (as anywhere else) knowing what program is causing the problem doesn't necessarily mean you can fix it.

    One common culprit for weird slowdowns is "mdworker", which is the metadata indexer. Every time you write to a file, including updates, it reads the contents to get all the info and update the Spotlight indices. Since you can search by file content, mdworker actually reads the entire file and updates a database of search terms, which can be very slow. You can disable this (do some Googling), but then Spotlight becomes basically useless. (Some would have it that Spotlight is already useless. I used to be one of them, but the 10.5 version is actually okay.) @superjer said:

    I've had a few programs crash already.
    Which ones? (Not that I'm suggesting that Mac programs are normally crash-proof -- until 10.5.2 came out the other day, Safari would crash for me at least once a day because it had some kind of weird reaction to scrolling when the mouse was not in the content area of a window. I'm just curious about which programs are crashing for you.) @superjer said:
    And Apple wanted me to pay $15 for a printscreen app from their website (??). I did find how to do it for free, though.

    I'd certainly hope so. Not only is the "Screen Shots" section near the top of the list of commands in the "Keyboard Shortcuts" part of System Preferences, if you type "how do I take a picture of the screen" into the help application the only result it gives back tells you what the default keyboard shortcut is and how to change it. And typing "Mac printscreen" into Google gives you a series of pages that give the info as well. (Including the esoteric variants, like hitting shift-command-4 and then typing space, which lets you choose a window and take a picture of it, which is voodoo.) And then there's the Grab utility which is included with the system...

    I seriously doubt Apple "wants" you to pay $15 for a printscreen app, since the Apple printscreen app is included with the OS. (I can't even find a $15 program to do screen capture on their store page, although I admit I haven't looked very hard.) @superjer said:

    Installing and using the developer tools was... different. I just wanted gcc but found it only comes in a 1.1GB package with apparently everything under the sun in it. At least I figured out all the hoops to jump through to get it to work.

    The developer tools install used to be more granular. Then they discovered that an overwhelming majority of developers were installing the same things, so the granular choices were actually making extra work for nearly everyone involved.

    I'm also a little curious as to what the "hoops" are that you had to jump through. If you're on the command line, once you install the developer tools the gcc man page is present (and I presume you'd read it anyway, right?), and if you prefer a GUI IDE, XCode takes care of the interface with gcc for you. (And yes, XCode can make GUI-less command-line programs. Just scroll down the list of project types.) @superjer said:

    And then there's GarageBand.

    Can't help you there. @superjer said:

    Am I just unlucky? Is my iMac brokened?

    Dunno. Not enough information, really. Go see what's causing the slowdowns first.



  • @The Vicar said:

    <AppleCrap/>

     

    Uh oh! Here come the Apple fanboys! 

    j/k



  • So, why can't you just open a terminal under OS X and type:

     sudo apt-get install gcc

    I thought that both sudo and the apt-get package manager were also on OS X.

     



  • @Jonathan Holland said:

    So, why can't you just open a terminal under OS X and type:

     sudo apt-get install gcc

    I thought that both sudo and the apt-get package manager were also on OS X.

     

    no, to do that, you have to install apt-get first, in this manner

    apt-get install apt-get

    Then you can install sudo. 



  • @belgariontheking said:

    no, to do that, you have to install apt-get first, in this manner

    apt-get install apt-get

    Then you can install sudo. 

     

    Kind sir,

    send the me the codez plz?

    kthxbye



  • @Jonathan Holland said:

    So, why can't you just open a terminal under OS X and type:

     sudo apt-get install gcc

    I thought that both sudo and the apt-get package manager were also on OS X.

     

    Sudo is, apt-get is not part of the default install (and isn't supported by Apple -- Mac Software Update works by other means). Nevertheless, apt-get is available -- it comes with Fink, for example.



  • @belgariontheking said:

    @Jonathan Holland said:

    So, why can't you just open a terminal under OS X and type:

     sudo apt-get install gcc

    I thought that both sudo and the apt-get package manager were also on OS X.

     

    no, to do that, you have to install apt-get first, in this manner

    apt-get install apt-get

    Then you can install sudo. 

     

     That reminds me of the first time I bought a car on credit.

    "Well, we would give you credit, but you don't have any established credit, so we can't give it to you".

    "How do I establish credit?"

    "Well, taking out a car loan is a good step."

     



  • @belgariontheking said:

    • AAC sounds like shit, and so does mp3.
      • AAC sounds more like your listening to music at a dance club. Way to much treble and bass not enough mid range sounds. You really have no other choice in codec’s. So your pretty much screwed.

    I wonder on what basis he thinks wma (or whatever) is better?  IANA sound technician, but I think that has more to do with your speakers and stereo than the compression codec. 

    Yep - "Music on my $2000 PC sounds like crap.  But at least I saved money by buying $10 speakers..."



  • @The Vicar said:

    @Jonathan Holland said:

    So, why can't you just open a terminal under OS X and type:

     sudo apt-get install gcc

    I thought that both sudo and the apt-get package manager were also on OS X.

     

    Sudo is, apt-get is not part of the default install (and isn't supported by Apple -- Mac Software Update works by other means). Nevertheless, apt-get is available -- it comes with Fink, for example.

    My preferred package manager is MacPorts, but by all means use Fink if you're already familiar with the workings of apt-get.

    As for the OP… after thirteen years of being a happy Mac user, it's all water off a duck's back. Idiots and trolls will never go extinct, so there's no use wasting the energy getting worked up over them. This one seems to be a bit more dumb than most, though (saying iTunes is the only media player available -- apparently he never checked to see if the VNC he mentions using under Windows is available for Mac -- and saying he can't change the formatting of the clock -- did he even try clicking on it?).



  • Fuck that edit limit bullshit. Here's a quick screenshot I'd be adding to my post above if this forum didn't suck an entire mountain's worth of goats. The question is how he found the option to make the time separators flash, but missed the option to not show the weekday next to the time.



  • @Albright said:

    Fuck that edit limit bullshit. Here's a quick screenshot I'd be adding to my post above if this forum didn't suck an entire mountain's worth of goats. The question is how he found the option to make the time separators flash, but missed the option to not show the weekday next to the time.

    Had trouble with the link, but apparently hotlinking is forbidden.  copy paste the link into a new browser. 

    Also, he said that he knew what day of the week it was, but didn't know the date, IIRC.   



  • Lack of date is indeed something of an oversight.

    At least Windows XP has a tooltip that shows the date.

    Unfortnately, the code that handles the taskbar focus is broken, so often objects in the bar/tray do not respond to hovering the mouse. 



  • @dhromed said:

    Unfortnately, the code that handles the taskbar focus is broken, so often objects in the bar/tray do not respond to hovering the mouse.

    Or, like what happens to me most of the time, the tooltips hide behind the taskbar. I've tried stuff like disabling and re-enabling Stay On Top, resizing it, moving it around the screen, etc, but none of it will fix it at that point. A reboot is the only thing that corrects the tooltips. I've also found that the system tray likes to steal the context menu of icons. The menu will come up for the icon, but then the tray menu will also pop up over that menu. It's retarded.



  • @dhromed said:

    At least Windows XP has a tooltip that shows the date.

     

    You get the full date when you click on OS X's clock.  I can appreciate having "8:18" in my menu bar, and not "Friday, February 15, 2008, 8:18 AM" ... at least on my tiny laptop screen.



  • @djork said:

    You get the full date when you click on OS X's clock.  I can appreciate having "8:18" in my menu bar, and not "Friday, February 15, 2008, 8:18 AM" ... at least on my tiny laptop screen.

     

    Totally forgot to log in to our Mac and futz about. I now have a clock on the desktop. So handy (nah).



  • @Albright said:

    My preferred package manager is MacPorts, but by all means use Fink if you're already familiar with the workings of apt-get.

    As for the OP… after thirteen years of being a happy Mac user, it's all water off a duck's back. Idiots and trolls will never go extinct, so there's no use wasting the energy getting worked up over them. This one seems to be a bit more dumb than most, though (saying iTunes is the only media player available -- apparently he never checked to see if the VNC he mentions using under Windows is available for Mac -- and saying he can't change the formatting of the clock -- did he even try clicking on it?).

     

    Agreed, though I didn't have much luck with MacPorts -- the GNU Scientific Library wouldn't compile through ports.  I like apt-get, but Fink is pretty suck too.  Most packages end up having to be compiled.  Not that I'm against compiling software, but apt-get isn't really such a good tool for that purpose.  The best I've found is Gentoo for OS X.  As usual with Gentoo, installation is a bit of a pain, straightforward, and fast enough on modern hardware.  And they do some testing to ensure that a package compiles before updating their SVN repository. 



  • I read it and there is just one thing wrong with it. Macs do have games,push Terminal, and then go to emacs and Esc-x and type tetris and it will a tetris game. This works on Linux as well. My computer is Windows but if I have to get a new computer or stop using XP then I will install Linux instead (probably Debian, but I'm not sure).


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