Worse than failure ad wtf



  •  

    er? 



  • YEAH, LET'S HACK A HUGE COMPANY!!



  • I have a similar book called Google Hacks. Material ranges from the rather obvious (passages covering Google News, Google Groups etc) to the more advanced (a lot of material on the Google API) and the mildly amusing (try searching for windows site:microsoft). It's 4 years old though.

    Remember hacking != cracking 



  • @AdvertOOOLOOKICANDOTHISWOW said:

    * Find your own sensitive data through Google before the bad guys do...which is just a matter of time!

     

     Umm...
     



  • I happen to think this is a good idea.  There are plenty of people who have no idea what information about them is on the Internet and how easy it is to access via search engines like Google.  At the very least, knowing what's out there fosters awareness.  But you can take it a step further and attempt to remove that information, and try to regain some measure of privacy.  Google's drive to consume all the information it can is quite troubling. 



  • I hope the WTF is "Locate targets Google doesn't even know about!" appearing in an ad for a book about using Google, because the rest is so normal as to be boring...



  • @purge said:

    I happen to think this is a good idea.  There are plenty of people who have no idea what information about them is on the Internet and how easy it is to access via search engines like Google.  At the very least, knowing what's out there fosters awareness.  But you can take it a step further and attempt to remove that information, and try to regain some measure of privacy.  Google's drive to consume all the information it can is quite troubling. 

    You would actually spend money on a book to find this stuff out?  This may be a little ironic but a quick google will find you all that information without needlessly buying a book, i mean, where do you think the guy did the research for his book?  I have thought about this before though, i've noticed a lot of older programmers/professionals tend to buy books about stuff rather than just looking it up, there would be money in just going round and slapping together a bunch of information that's readily available online and selling it as a book.


     



  • @element[0] said:

    @purge said:

    I happen to think this is a good idea.  There are plenty of people who have no idea what information about them is on the Internet and how easy it is to access via search engines like Google.  At the very least, knowing what's out there fosters awareness.  But you can take it a step further and attempt to remove that information, and try to regain some measure of privacy.  Google's drive to consume all the information it can is quite troubling. 

    You would actually spend money on a book to find this stuff out?  This may be a little ironic but a quick google will find you all that information without needlessly buying a book, i mean, where do you think the guy did the research for his book?  I have thought about this before though, i've noticed a lot of older programmers/professionals tend to buy books about stuff rather than just looking it up, there would be money in just going round and slapping together a bunch of information that's readily available online and selling it as a book.


     

     

    I've noticed that when looking for stuff online, I tend to read only the part that I'm looking for, which can often overlook something valuable.  This is only worsened by the fact that a lot of the information you find while googling only answers one specific question.  With a book, I'm more likely to read the whole thing (to get my money's worth) and learn something new. 



  • I like the part that says "Locate targets Google doesn't even know about!"   How can you use google's search engine to find something that isn't in google's search engine?



  • @element[0] said:

    @purge said:

    I happen to think this is a good idea.  There are plenty of people who have no idea what information about them is on the Internet and how easy it is to access via search engines like Google.  At the very least, knowing what's out there fosters awareness.  But you can take it a step further and attempt to remove that information, and try to regain some measure of privacy.  Google's drive to consume all the information it can is quite troubling. 

    You would actually spend money on a book to find this stuff out?  This may be a little ironic but a quick google will find you all that information without needlessly buying a book, i mean, where do you think the guy did the research for his book?  I have thought about this before though, i've noticed a lot of older programmers/professionals tend to buy books about stuff rather than just looking it up, there would be money in just going round and slapping together a bunch of information that's readily available online and selling it as a book.



    Well, if it's like [url=http://johnny.ihackstuff.com/ghdb.php]the author's website[/url], it has some interesting stuff that not many people would think to search for (the network enabled cameras are especially entertaining).  By the way, O'Reilly stole your idea about printing man pages.



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

     

    I've noticed that when looking for stuff online, I tend to read only the part that I'm looking for, which can often overlook something valuable.  This is only worsened by the fact that a lot of the information you find while googling only answers one specific question.  With a book, I'm more likely to read the whole thing (to get my money's worth) and learn something new. 

     

    Also, books are far more pleasant to read than online documentation. 



  • @m0ffx said:

    and the mildly amusing (try searching for windows site:microsoft).

     

    What, that it doesn't return any hits (whereas windows site:microsoft.com does)?
     



  • @emurphy said:

    @m0ffx said:

    and the mildly amusing (try searching for windows site:microsoft).

     

    What, that it doesn't return any hits (whereas windows site:microsoft.com does)?
     

    Yeah. It won't bother anyone HERE, we know why. But with the right 'patter', you could use it to befuddle Joe User. At least that's the idea in the book. 



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

    @element[0] said:

    @purge said:

    I happen to think this is a good idea.  There are plenty of people who have no idea what information about them is on the Internet and how easy it is to access via search engines like Google.  At the very least, knowing what's out there fosters awareness.  But you can take it a step further and attempt to remove that information, and try to regain some measure of privacy.  Google's drive to consume all the information it can is quite troubling. 

    You would actually spend money on a book to find this stuff out?  This may be a little ironic but a quick google will find you all that information without needlessly buying a book, i mean, where do you think the guy did the research for his book?  I have thought about this before though, i've noticed a lot of older programmers/professionals tend to buy books about stuff rather than just looking it up, there would be money in just going round and slapping together a bunch of information that's readily available online and selling it as a book.


    I've noticed that when looking for stuff online, I tend to read only the part that I'm looking for, which can often overlook something valuable.  This is only worsened by the fact that a lot of the information you find while googling only answers one specific question.  With a book, I'm more likely to read the whole thing (to get my money's worth) and learn something new. 

     Good point, i hadn't really thought of that, a book probably is a better way to get a good overall view of a topic in a considered way.  Not really my style of research, i don't mind reading of a screen for long periods but i know a lot of people that don't like it so i guess that's where a physical book is quite handy.
     


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