Multilingual delivery information



  • Last night I was ordering some stuff at www.vistaprint.nl. While I was inputting my address, out of the corner of my eye I noticed something change lower down in the window. Taking a closer look, it turns out that was the delivery information:

    It was all in Dutch when I started, but now it had suddenly turned into a mixture of Dutch and French … (For those who don't read either, the header at the top is in Dutch, the paragraph below it is in French except for the blue link at the end, the bold titles of the delivery options are in French but the non-bold lines below them are in Dutch, except for the dates and the orange text which are in French. Oh, and the price notation also follows French/Belgian standards — in the Netherlands the convention is € 4,99 rather than 4,99 €.)



  • Frutch? Dench?

    Edit - that would be:

    vs


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Gurth said:

    a mixture of Dutch and French …

    You're in Belgium? That explains a lot…



  • Then what is he doing on vistaprint.nl (dutch site) and not vistaprint.be?

    @dkf said:

    That explains a lot

    Touchê


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Luhmann said:

    Then what is he doing on vistaprint.nl (dutch site) and not vistaprint.be?

    :giggity:

    Näturlich…



  • If you go over to German version of Amazon in Poland, and switch language to English, you'll get a mixture of German-English-Polish. Now that's fun to read.



  • @NeighborhoodButcher said:

    If you go over to German version of Amazon in Poland, and switch language to English, you'll get a mixture of German-English-Polish. Now that's fun to read.

    That...that sounds like it might be fun to try to read out loud, especially if you know at most one of the languages. I wonder, among people who only know one of the three, which known language would correspond to the most overall accurate pronunciations?

    ...And once again, I have highlighted text in this editor, told it to make it italic, wondered why it made it bold instead, and then remembered "oh yeah, Markdown is more popular than Textile. Bummer."



  • @dkf said:

    You're in ■■■■■■■?

    Nope, just to the north of it.



  • @kilroo said:

    I wonder, among people who only know one of the three, which known language would correspond to the most overall accurate pronunciations?

    English. Unlike Polish or German, it's impossible in English to pronounce words you don't know beforehand, so they wouldn't even try.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Gaska said:

    it's impossible in English to pronounce words you don't know beforehand

    It's only impossible to do it correctly. So the Americans don't bother! :trollface:



  • And then you have musicians who misspell their own band names so idiots won't make their ears bleed everywhere they go.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    Is that a redwall picture?


  • sockdevs

    A quick survey of my brain says..... "Yes, From Pearls of Lutra."

    so it's probably a redwall picture, but not from the book The Pearls of Lutra


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    Lord Brocktree, apparently.



  • E_NO_REPRO here.. the only German phrase i can spot is the language selection.



  • @Gaska said:

    @kilroo said:
    I wonder, among people who only know one of the three, which known language would correspond to the most overall accurate pronunciations?

    English. Unlike Polish or German, it's impossible in English to pronounce words you don't know beforehand, so they wouldn't even try.

    I thought that might be balanced out by phonemes that Americans have no practice pronouncing. Or knowledge of what character combinations imply them. But I don't know enough about Polish or German to speculate much.



  • @kilroo said:

    "oh yeah, Markdown is unmitigated bullshit which is inexplicably more popular than Textile. Bummer."

    I mean, your thing is technically correct, it just doesn't sufficiently emphasize how truly dreadful Markdown really is.

    Filed under: fuck Markdown



  • @Gurth said:

    Nope, just to the north of it.

    Well, that explains it. They're all still hungover from the "carnaval".



  • @Gaska said:

    Unlike Polish or German, it's impossible in English to pronounce words you don't know beforehand
    Gee, I do it all the time.



  • Maybe they fixed it.



  • @Gaska said:

    it's impossible in English to pronounce words you don't know beforehand

    Nonsense. All you have to do is look at the word, determine based on it's spelling it's likely root origins, determine which set of phonetics are used for such words, run it over in your head once or twice, force the phonetics to blend together a bit, and then you know exactly how to speak the word in question. When in doubt, you fall back on the most common English pronunciation of the letters. Anybody who's still upset is probably not worth bothering with.

    It sounds absurd, and, indeed most people won't bother, but if you have a large vocabulary is easy enough to do. I find I can pronounce most unfamiliar foreign anglicized words fairly accurately about 95% of the time, and unfamiliar English words almost all the time. I admit that think I'm much better at it than most people.

    It's basically the same thing you do when you run across names like Baczewski, Kwiatkowski, Kawakita, Nguyen, Tzou, Albrecht, or Lafontaine and you know how it's supposed to sound. I will admit that Yzaguirre still gives me pause every time I see it, though.



  • ...says the guy who wrote "it's" instead of "its". Twice.



  • Good thing they're pronounced the same.



  • Unfortunately, text isn't heard - it's read; so even if you wouldn't sound like an idiot if you said all that instead of writing it, you still look like an idiot here.



  • Oh shit. Not on the Internet!



  • @Gurth said:

    in the Netherlands the convention is € 4,99 rather than 4,99 €

    Why is any nation in the EU allowed to do stupid shit like this? All you're doing is blowing up switch statements everywhere else in the world for literally no fucking reason, dicks.



  • @nerd4sale said:

    Well, that explains it. They're all still hungover from the "carnaval".

    They may be, but I’m in the part of the country that is both next to Belgium and in which that particular celebration is thankfully rare.



  • @BaconBits said:

    Yzaguirre

    I don't even know. Izgwar? For all I know, it's pronounced like 'Ralph'.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @aapis said:

    All you're doing is blowing up switch statements everywhere else in the world for literally no fucking reason, dicks.

    Why would you switch on this sort of thing? It's just a format you can pull from a message catalog…



  • Why would you do that, when you could X the Y with Z???

    Yeah, there's more than one way to do everything. Everything.



  • @aapis said:

    Why is any nation in the EU allowed to do stupid shit like this?

    https://what.thedailywtf.com/t/your-bill-is-30-5/49145/70



  • @Gurth said:

    Oh, and the price notation also follows French/Belgian standards — in the Netherlands the convention is € 4,99 rather than 4,99 €.)

    For reasons that are, I suspect, purely historical, the French will sometimes write that price as 4€99.

    And in the original screenshot, the "(TTC)" is also French, "Toutes Taxes Comprises" => literally All Taxes Included.



  • @kilroo said:

    @NeighborhoodButcher said:
    If you go over to German version of Amazon in Poland, and switch language to English, you'll get a mixture of German-English-Polish. Now that's fun to read.

    That...that sounds like it might be fun to try to read out loud, especially if you know at most one of the languages.


    Especially if you read it in a Swedish Chef accent.



  • @Magus said:

    @BaconBits said:
    Yzaguirre

    I don't even know. Izgwar? For all I know, it's pronounced like 'Ralph'.

    The guy I worked with pronounced it eez-eh-goo-ee-err. I still always pronounced it wrong if I was reading it. It's a Spanish name, believe it or not. Usually I just called him Antonio.



  • Most Americans and New Zealand people I know assume that an unusual letter at the beginning of the word should just be pronounced with its name a lot of the time, so I imagine some people would say waizagwaier.



  • ISTR seeing prices like “19F50” way back when in France, too. Also, it’s how people commonly say it: “four euro ninety-nine” so there is a logic to writing it like that.


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