Making QR-Codes usefull



  • Personally, I find myself interested in QR-Codes. I think they provide a fairly quick way of copying content from real life paper to smartphones.

    Nonetheless, the people at my organization find it interesting too. I think it's because they can provide new ways of being useless. Like this tags that were created, printed and glued next to the light switches, indicating what room you are in.



  • Actually that COULD be useful. My university has an online system for booking space. If the QR code took you to a site where you could see if the room was available and you could reserve it for a meeting, that would be very handy.



  • @barfoo said:

    Actually that COULD be useful. My university has an online system for booking space. If the QR code took you to a site where you could see if the room was available and you could reserve it for a meeting, that would be very handy.

    Wasn't mentioned as true or false in the OP and you and I already know it doesn't.



  • Maybe if you got lost it could show you a map.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    I see your company follows the Ben L school of abusing QR codes' ECC, too.

    @josem said:

    Personally, I find myself interested in QR-Codes. I think they provide a fairly quick way of copying content from real life paper to smartphones.

    Nonetheless, the people at my organization find it interesting too. I think it's because they can provide new ways of being useless. Like this tags that were created, printed and glued next to the light switches, indicating what room you are in.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @josem said:

    Maybe the ink is raised so blind people can read them....



  • @barfoo said:

    Actually that COULD be useful. My university has an online system for booking space. If the QR code took you to a site where you could see if the room was available and you could reserve it for a meeting, that would be very handy.

    That would be a good use, yes, but all this QR code says is "Sala 2.10". Maybe they have a special app that can read these and show something useful (like a custom maps app)? Or blind people that use some kind of device that can scan your surroundings for things like QR codes and read them aloud?



  • In fact, it could be usefull. Not in this way. :-)

    Not on the light switch, but on a server, e.g.
    If you have a qr-code to the url where you have a Nagios or NagVis, you can see any alarm of that system or platform state (disk usage, or high cpu loads).

    I suggested that, and it was refused. Hurray for babelfishing words to QR-Codes.






  • @anonymous235 said:

    @barfoo said:
    Actually that COULD be useful. My university has an online system for booking space. If the QR code took you to a site where you could see if the room was available and you could reserve it for a meeting, that would be very handy.

    That would be a good use, yes, but all this QR code says is "Sala 2.10". Maybe they have a special app that can read these and show something useful (like a custom maps app)? Or blind people that use some kind of device that can scan your surroundings for things like QR codes and read them aloud?

    Personally, I think they should just replace braille with 3D QR codes, having the black parts be raised, or such.



  • In the event of robocop appears and his eye-cameras are off?



  • @josem said:

    In the event of robocop appears and his eye-cameras are off?

    After he's seen that T-shirt, you mean?



  • In the building I used to work in, they placed QR Code labels at the end-points of the security gaurds assigned patrol routes through the building and required them to carry around a bulky tablet and scan each code.  This supplanted their traditional paper log file.



  • @Medezark said:

    In the building I used to work in, they placed QR Code labels at the end-points of the security gaurds assigned patrol routes through the building and required them to carry around a bulky tablet and scan each code.  This supplanted their traditional paper log file.

    So they replaced their "just fill in the paperwork" version of lazy with the "make copies of all the QR codes on a piece of paper in my pocket" type so they still didn't have to leave their chairs?



  • @e4tmyl33t said:

    @Medezark said:

    In the building I used to work in, they placed QR Code labels at the end-points of the security gaurds assigned patrol routes through the building and required them to carry around a bulky tablet and scan each code.  This supplanted their traditional paper log file.

    So they replaced their "just fill in the paperwork" version of lazy with the "make copies of all the QR codes on a piece of paper in my pocket" type so they still didn't have to leave their chairs?

    Probably. Although if you wanted to force them to actually move around the building you could just make the QR codes be displayed on screens and have them change for every patrol.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @DescentJS said:

    @e4tmyl33t said:
    @Medezark said:

    In the building I used to work in, they placed QR Code labels at the end-points of the security gaurds assigned patrol routes through the building and required them to carry around a bulky tablet and scan each code.  This supplanted their traditional paper log file.

    So they replaced their "just fill in the paperwork" version of lazy with the "make copies of all the QR codes on a piece of paper in my pocket" type so they still didn't have to leave their chairs?

    Probably. Although if you wanted to force them to actually move around the building you could just make the QR codes be displayed on screens and have them change for every patrol.


    Maybe something with RFID? Or just use the GPS on the tablets.



  • @joe.edwards said:

    @DescentJS said:
    @e4tmyl33t said:
    @Medezark said:

    In the building I used to work in, they placed QR Code labels at the end-points of the security gaurds assigned patrol routes through the building and required them to carry around a bulky tablet and scan each code.  This supplanted their traditional paper log file.

    So they replaced their "just fill in the paperwork" version of lazy with the "make copies of all the QR codes on a piece of paper in my pocket" type so they still didn't have to leave their chairs?
    Probably. Although if you wanted to force them to actually move around the building you could just make the QR codes be displayed on screens and have them change for every patrol.
    Maybe something with RFID? Or just use the GPS on the tablets.

    Or count on the fact that the really lazy security guys are the only ones you actually need a system like that for and they are less likely to successfully be able to make duplicates of the QR Codes; thus it's a silly investment.



  • Reverse the design: have each guard scan his code at various cameras along the route.



  • An apps that lets you turn on/off the lights from your phone (or a central server)? those don't look like standard light switches, maybe they are networked...



  • @josem said:

    huge image copying contest

    What the...‽

    COMPUTER! ZOOM AND ENHANCE!

    What the fuck is that shit?



  • Wait, it gets worse.

    The code contains exactly zero information that the piece of paper does not already contain. And it's a corrupt encoding because they splashed their logo in the middle of the data.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Buttembly Coder said:

    Personally, I think they should just replace braille with 3D QR codes, having the black parts be raised, or such.
    That's an original idea...



  • <type>- It reads, "Here may be found...
    "...the last words of Joseph of Arimathea:
    "'He who is valiant and pure of spirit...
    "'...may find the Holy Grail...
    "'...in the Castle of Aaargh."'

    • What?
      -"The Castle of Aaargh."
      -What is that?
      -He must have died while carving it.
      -Come on!
      -That's what it says.
      -Look, if he was dying, he wouldn't bother to carve "Aaargh."

    This room would be the "castle of huh?".

    Botomline: It's stupid and irrelevant. These light switches are inside a room with RFID card controlled access. There is a label next to the door with the room number. There is no need for a label inside the room, near the switches, with a translation to qrcode-ish of the room number.</type>


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @bgodot said:

    those don't look like standard light switches, maybe they are networked...
    They look like switches connected to a timer (so the light goes out after a while; useful for public and semi-public spaces which often have long periods not being used) with some sort of built-in flashing indicator so that they are easier to find in the dark. Being networked with something like X10 is entirely possible, but I suspect most places are too cheap to use anything that complicated.



  • @bgodot said:

    An apps that lets you turn on/off the lights from your phone (or a central server)? those don't look like standard light switches, maybe they are networked...
     

    Looks like low-voltage switches. There are a bunch of manufacturers that make them. Makes it easier to do things like control the system using occupancy sensors, timers, ambient light sensors, etc. The switches themselves only have something like 24V on them, the high voltage to the lights is switched by relays that are mounted closer to the fixtures.



  • @bgodot said:

    those don't look like standard light switches, maybe they are networked...
     

    Godsdamnit!
           \



  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Ben L. said:


    The code contains exactly zero information that the piece of paper does not already contain. And it's a corrupt encoding because they splashed their logo in the middle of the data.

    Shorter Ben L.: "this is the pot.  You're black."

     



  • @FrostCat said:

    @Ben L. said:


    The code contains exactly zero information that the piece of paper does not already contain. And it's a corrupt encoding because they splashed their logo in the middle of the data.

    Shorter Ben L.: "this is the pot.  You're black."

     


    Care to explain?



  • @Ben L. said:

    @FrostCat said:

    @Ben L. said:


    The code contains exactly zero information that the piece of paper does not already contain. And it's a corrupt encoding because they splashed their logo in the middle of the data.

    Shorter Ben L.: "this is the pot.  You're black."

     


    Care to explain?



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    @Ben L. said:

    @FrostCat said:

    @Ben L. said:


    The code contains exactly zero information that the piece of paper does not already contain. And it's a corrupt encoding because they splashed their logo in the middle of the data.

    Shorter Ben L.: "this is the pot.  You're black."

     


    Care to explain?

    That's a valid QR code. What about it?



  • @Ben L. said:

    That's a valid QR code. What about it?
    You asked for an explanation. Valid or not, that's the explanation of why FrostCat was making fun of you criticizing someone else abusing QR codes.

     


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Ben L. said:

    @HardwareGeek said:

    @Ben L. said:

    @FrostCat said:

    @Ben L. said:


    The code contains exactly zero information that the piece of paper does not already contain. And it's a corrupt encoding because they splashed their logo in the middle of the data.

    Shorter Ben L.: "this is the pot.  You're black."

     


    Care to explain?

    That's a valid QR code. What about it?

    For some definitions of valid.



  • @joe.edwards said:

    @Ben L. said:
    @HardwareGeek said:

    @Ben L. said:

    @FrostCat said:

    @Ben L. said:


    The code contains exactly zero information that the piece of paper does not already contain. And it's a corrupt encoding because they splashed their logo in the middle of the data.

    Shorter Ben L.: "this is the pot.  You're black."

     


    Care to explain?

    That's a valid QR code. What about it?

    For some definitions of valid.

    It encodes this data: http://goo.gl/DhW14#349714602681351643958002013213429978634586746342674064192962655573501342945786810681699440760000064111843343872333206000207987341930676361341460009896160086754047330182666661330641944007773397325458533042765341171856241320000852165341084146986677258512080001256501342848

    There are no encoding errors in the qr code.



  • @Ben L. said:

    @joe.edwards said:
    @Ben L. said:
    @HardwareGeek said:

    @Ben L. said:

    @FrostCat said:

    @Ben L. said:


    The code contains exactly zero information that the piece of paper does not already contain. And it's a corrupt encoding because they splashed their logo in the middle of the data.

    Shorter Ben L.: "this is the pot.  You're black."

     


    Care to explain?

    That's a valid QR code. What about it?

    For some definitions of valid.

    It encodes this data: http://goo.gl/DhW14#349714602681351643958002013213429978634586746342674064192962655573501342945786810681699440760000064111843343872333206000207987341930676361341460009896160086754047330182666661330641944007773397325458533042765341171856241320000852165341084146986677258512080001256501342848

    There are no encoding errors in the qr code.

    Blarg. Wish I had the time, energy, or fucks given to find that post where some guy ran it through an analyzer and it failed.


  • @mikeTheLiar said:

    @Ben L. said:
    @joe.edwards said:
    @Ben L. said:
    @HardwareGeek said:

    @Ben L. said:

    @FrostCat said:

    @Ben L. said:


    The code contains exactly zero information that the piece of paper does not already contain. And it's a corrupt encoding because they splashed their logo in the middle of the data.

    Shorter Ben L.: "this is the pot.  You're black."

     


    Care to explain?

    That's a valid QR code. What about it?

    For some definitions of valid.

    It encodes this data: http://goo.gl/DhW14#349714602681351643958002013213429978634586746342674064192962655573501342945786810681699440760000064111843343872333206000207987341930676361341460009896160086754047330182666661330641944007773397325458533042765341171856241320000852165341084146986677258512080001256501342848

    There are no encoding errors in the qr code.

    Blarg. Wish I had the time, energy, or fucks given to find that post where some guy ran it through an analyzer and it failed.

     Plugging his URL into [url]http://goqr.me[/url] produces the same image so there's nothing sneaky going on...



  • @mikeTheLiar said:

    @Ben L. said:
    @joe.edwards said:
    @Ben L. said:
    That's a valid QR code. What about it?

    For some definitions of valid.

    It encodes this data: http://goo.gl/DhW14#349714602681351643958002013213429978634586746342674064192962655573501342945786810681699440760000064111843343872333206000207987341930676361341460009896160086754047330182666661330641944007773397325458533042765341171856241320000852165341084146986677258512080001256501342848

    There are no encoding errors in the qr code.

    Blarg. Wish I had the time, energy, or fucks given to find that post where some guy ran it through an analyzer and it failed.
    Same thread I found the image: http://forums.thedailywtf.com/forums/p/28225/331158.aspx#331158

  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @HardwareGeek said:

    @Ben L. said:

    That's a valid QR code. What about it?
    You asked for an explanation. Valid or not, that's the explanation of why FrostCat was making fun of you criticizing someone else abusing QR codes.

     

    Not sure if Ben is trolling or stupid. After all, I quoted him saying "And it's a corrupt encoding because they splashed their logo in the middle of the data."



  • QR codes aren't completely useless. After all, if you overhear someone talking about them or see someone scanning one (a 45-second-long "nerd's chorea"), you then know that this person is a pedantic tardnozzle who is in love with technology for its own sake. QR codes are to dweebs what Ed Hardy shirts are to limp-dicked idiots.




  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @mikeTheLiar said:

    Blarg. Wish I had the time, energy, or fucks given to find that post where some guy ran it through an analyzer and it failed.
    Pendantic-dickweedly, it didn't fail; the correct information was extracted. It just warned that there was a lot of use of the error-correction information, a situation usually indicative of a crappy picture.



  • @DescentJS said:

    @e4tmyl33t said:
    @Medezark said:

    In the building I used to work in, they placed QR Code labels at the end-points of the security gaurds assigned patrol routes through the building and required them to carry around a bulky tablet and scan each code.  This supplanted their traditional paper log file.

    So they replaced their "just fill in the paperwork" version of lazy with the "make copies of all the QR codes on a piece of paper in my pocket" type so they still didn't have to leave their chairs?

    Probably. Although if you wanted to force them to actually move around the building you could just make the QR codes be displayed on screens and have them change for every patrol.

     

     Or require them  to tag on at each security door on the way, and use the building access logs to ensure they moved around?  At least, that's how my employer does it...

     



  • @Kyanar said:

    @DescentJS said:

    @e4tmyl33t said:
    @Medezark said:

    In the building I used to work in, they placed QR Code labels at the end-points of the security gaurds assigned patrol routes through the building and required them to carry around a bulky tablet and scan each code.  This supplanted their traditional paper log file.

    So they replaced their "just fill in the paperwork" version of lazy with the "make copies of all the QR codes on a piece of paper in my pocket" type so they still didn't have to leave their chairs?

    Probably. Although if you wanted to force them to actually move around the building you could just make the QR codes be displayed on screens and have them change for every patrol.

     

     Or require them  to tag on at each security door on the way, and use the building access logs to ensure they moved around?  At least, that's how my employer does it...

     

    The best solution is to sit old women all over the building. If the guy does not do his rounds they will tell everyone about it. Also their bodies are mostly cold and they don't move a lot so they may not even trigger the lights sensor. Creepy old women lurking in the dark, there is nothing like it. Especially if they are italians and are known to put the evil eye on people who cross them.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Ronald said:

    The best solution is to sit old women all over the building. If the guy does not do his rounds they will tell everyone about it. Also their bodies are mostly cold and they don't move a lot so they may not even trigger the lights sensor. Creepy old women lurking in the dark, there is nothing like it. Especially if they are italians and are known to put the evil eye on people who cross them.
    I'm told that this was the Russian approach to museum security during the Soviet period. Except that they were Russian creepy old women, and not Italian.



  • @josem said:

     

    I think the QR code contains instructions on how to flip on the lightswitch, in case it is too dark to see the lightswitch.

     



  • @bridget99 said:

    QR codes aren't completely useless. After all, if you overhear someone talking about them or see someone scanning one (a 45-second-long "nerd's chorea"), you then know that this person is a pedantic tardnozzle who is in love with technology for its own sake.
    Or, you know that that person works with package tracking, the application that originally popularized QR codes.

    Also, "pedantic" doesn't mean what you think it means.

    Idiot.



  • @Zylon said:

    @bridget99 said:

    QR codes aren't completely useless. After all, if you overhear someone talking about them or see someone scanning one (a 45-second-long "nerd's chorea"), you then know that this person is a pedantic tardnozzle who is in love with technology for its own sake.
    Or, you know that that person works with package tracking, the application that originally popularized QR codes.

    Also, "pedantic" doesn't mean what you think it means.

    Idiot.

    I think you are the one who doesn't know what "pedantic" means. Probably because you confuse "pedantic" with "pedantic dickweedery". Synecdochian buffoon.



  • @Ronald said:

    I think you are the one who doesn't know what "pedantic" means.
    Pedant-- "a person who is excessively concerned with minor details and rules". Which has absolutely nothing to do with using or discussing QR codes and oh what the fuck I'm actually responding to a McRonald post.

     



  • @Zylon said:

    @Ronald said:

    I think you are the one who doesn't know what "pedantic" means.
    Pedant-- "a person who is excessively concerned with minor details and rules". Which has absolutely nothing to do with using or discussing QR codes

    How convenient that you skip parts of the definition that make you look like a moron.

    Pedantic:

    1. Like a pedant, overly concerned with formal rules and trivial points of learning.
    2. Being showy of one’s knowledge, often in a boring manner.
    3. Being finicky or fastidious, especially with language.

    RTFD

    @Zylon said:

    and oh what the fuck I'm actually responding to a McRonald post.

     

    By replying then immediately saying that you should not reply, you are once again making the demonstration that you are a spineless wuss. That actually warrants a quote from the book:



    @Revelation 3:15-16 said:

    I know your deeds, that you are neither cold nor hot. I wish you were either one or the other! So, because you are lukewarm—neither hot nor cold—I am about to spit you out of my mouth.


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