Protecting the truly important stuff



  • I went to visit a friend at his office during lunch today. While there, I asked for the key to the men's room. I was told that while the key was turned, I also had to enter a four digit code on the pad to gain entry. Ooooookaaayyyy....

    As I went to insert the key, I noticed the women's room had the same key+combo setup. Right between the doors was another door. It was ajar. I peeked inside. It was the telco closet with all the ethernet cables and routers for the entire floor. It wasn't just left unlocked; there wasn't even a  lock on the door.

    Just sayin...

     



  • The closet is obviously a decoy. The REAL stuff is under the floor in the toilet.

    Watch where you pee.



  • You have friends that work at shitty companies too?



  • @blakeyrat said:

    You have friends that work at shitty companies too?

    I'm assuming it's NY, so it's probably the same crazy real estate pressures that cause people to think tiny apartments are places to live.



  • @snoofle said:

    the key to the men's room
     

    You say this as if it's normal to lock down toilets.



  • @boomzilla said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    You have friends that work at shitty companies too?

    I'm assuming it's NY, so it's probably the same crazy real estate pressures that cause people to think tiny apartments are places to live.

     

    That thin table from the table site in the other thread looks ideal for those places.



  • @dhromed said:

    @snoofle said:

    the key to the men's room
     

    You say this as if it's normal to lock down toilets.

    My company had to introduce a lock, because after everyone had gone home, some ninja ladies in tabards would swoop in and clean them, and everyone was really weirded out by it the next morning.



  • @dhromed said:

    @snoofle said:

    the key to the men's room
     

    You say this as if it's normal to lock down toilets.

    In many corprate environments it is.  This is to prevent the high cost of the occational missing roll of TP and the time it takes to use the restroom (that isn't work!).  Of course these are also the same places that make you spend an hour (or more) each week filling out detailed timesheets where every option on where to bill your time points to the same department.



  • @snoofle said:

    I went to visit a friend at his office during lunch today. While there, I asked for the key to the men's room. I was told that while the key was turned, I also had to enter a four digit code on the pad to gain entry. Ooooookaaayyyy....

    As I went to insert the key, I noticed the women's room had the same key+combo setup. Right between the doors was another door. It was ajar. I peeked inside. It was the telco closet with all the ethernet cables and routers for the entire floor. It wasn't just left unlocked; there wasn't even a  lock on the door.

    Just sayin...

     

    I'd bet a dollar that the door was left open to improve air flow in the closet.



  • Also, in the big city you don't want random transients manning the glory hole. Leave that to Bruce in HR.



  • @locallunatic said:

    In many corprate environments it is.
     

    What the fucking fuck.



  • I wonder if you could get a photo?



  • @dhromed said:

    @locallunatic said:

    In many corprate environments it is.
     

    What the fucking fuck.

    To be fair, it's the stuffier ones that feel the need to put restrictions on everything they can (more on the East coast of the US then on the West coast).  My theory is that they aren't companies as we think of them (businesses) but rather organizations designed to piss away shareholder value while turning employees into mindless automations.

    EDIT: though figuring out ways around the insane rules can be a fun challenge if you approach it properly, so they can also help you develop "creative problem solving" skills (mostly lies and blackmail).



  • @snoofle said:

    I also had to enter a four digit code on the pad to gain entry.
    The assumption there is that the code was the same for everyone, and in no way used to track how often individuals were 'wasting company time'.



  • @dhromed said:

    @locallunatic said:

    In many corprate environments it is.
     

    What the fucking fuck.

    I don't think I've ever heard of this.

    When the Shell service station locks their doors and requires customers to get a key, people retaliate by duct-taping the lock open and having miscarriages in the sink. I wonder if the corporate employees do the same..



  • @boomzilla said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    You have friends that work at shitty companies too?

    I'm assuming it's NY, so it's probably the same crazy real estate pressures that cause people to think tiny apartments are places to live.

    If they leave the bathroom door unlocked for a week, a nomadic tribe of hipsters will take up residence.



  • @dhromed said:

    You say this as if it's normal to lock down toilets.

    You don't want people wandering in off the streets and using your bathroom (and not just for the obvious use; but for drug deals, "encounters" and other shady dealings).


    Apparently it is much less of a concern that someone may wander in and rip wires out of their connections. Or make an phone call using your equipment.



  • @dhromed said:

    @snoofle said:

    the key to the men's room
     

    You say this as if it's normal to lock down toilets.

     

    Pretty common around here, especially in buildings shared by multiple companies, where the restrooms are in the hallway.  I always assumed it had something to do with not letting men into the ladies' room and vice-versa, but upon reflection, I prefer morbius' hipster theory.

     



  • @sprained said:

    Pretty common around here, especially in buildings shared by multiple companies, where the restrooms are in the hallway.

    I've been in plenty of office buildings, and I don't remember any having locked toilets. Then again, most of them had armed guards in the lobby who would check your ID before letting you even get on an elevator.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @sprained said:
    Pretty common around here, especially in buildings shared by multiple companies, where the restrooms are in the hallway.
    I've been in plenty of office buildings, and I don't remember any having locked toilets. Then again, most of them had armed guards in the lobby who would check your ID before letting you even get on an elevator.

    That works in a building that is just the one company (or maybe 2-3) but becomes problematic if there are lots of them; think a high rise where a company will have a few floors but above and below them are different companies.  Now imagine trying to get 10+ different corprate physical security guys to agree on some standard for getting in (not going to happen).


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.