Git git git git git git git git heroku git git heroku git git git git git



  • @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    Oh yay GitHub fuckups! Whee I missed this!

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    "Failed to merge 'develop' into 'master'. You might need to open a shell and debug the state of this repo." How about FUCK YOU?

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    Better Git error: "I tried to do something, I won't tell you what, and something went wrong, I won't tell you what, fix it for me plz!"

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    I used to think Lotus Notes had bad error messages, but now I'm starting to appreciate them much more.

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    GitHub: "failed to clone repo, check your internet connection." Uh it's fine. How about you debug your broken-ass shit software?

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    OH HEY LOOKEE THERE if I wipe out the repo and check-out again, suddenly the merge works as if by magic.

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    Oh wait I spoke too soon, now I am in the "middle of a merge conflict" (I am?) and of course GitHub can't resolve those.

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    Next time someone tells me to use git because it's good at branching and merging, I think I'll just point and laugh.

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    "By 'branching' we mean 'breaking', and by 'merging' we mean 'making you so angry you pull your hair out'. That's what Git's good at."

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    FUCK IT I will deploy to the web server from the "develop" branch may God have mercy on my soul

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    How the shit do you deploy to Heroku if someone else set up the git remote? WTF.

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    It's the EXTREMELY discoverable and easy-to-remember command: git remote add heroku git@heroku.com:project.git

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    (where the last part that looks like an email address but isn't it spit out from the Heroku website.)

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    Permission denied (publickey) Uh... ok? Good thing the Heroku docs mention that possible error. Oh wait they didn't.

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    Ok I'm desperate, does anybody know how to work Heroku? Their documentation is utterly wrong and incomplete.

    @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    Ok I finally figured it out! Had to find a mysterious ssh key and paste it into a field on Heroku's website.



  • I like git more than svn or cvs, but sometimes it just shits itself. Or you'll try to do a rebase or something to fix your history and: BAM! lost all your shit. (I always create a local backup before trying a rebase or anything similarly complicated.)

    I thought mercurial was better overall, although like most VCSs, it lacks good GUI tools. (The Tortoise stuff for Windows is okay, but it still feels clunky.) I don't understand why there isn't some VCS out there that started with a good GUI. I mean, managing lots of complex branches and revisions and merging is ultimately a task which lends itself very well to a visual interface, but instead we work off text labels and SHA-1 hashes..



  • @Blakeyrat's Twitter said:

    I used to think Lotus Notes had bad error messages, but now I'm starting to appreciate them much more.
    Uhh, they may have gotten worse since you last saw them.

    "Error number 308" occurred to me earlier this week. Google that without having to include a ton of filters for +Lotus +Notes -script...

    Still doesn't beat "Error 3:10" or whatever it was. For a damn password reset. Try to google an error that has the same format as time. Even with all the filters, you won't find any mention of the error on the interwebz. True story, we had a company outage on the email servers and a fixpack update on the servers just to fix that one error, that prevented us from resetting a users password, because IBM told us so. Still didn't fix it. I think we ended up nuking the account and recreating it.



  • Lotus Notes was designed in, what, 1987? Nobody knew what the fuck they were doing then. (Well, except Apple-- but Apple obviously had no influence over the idiots making Lotus products back in the day.)

    Git was designed in 2005. WHAT IS THEIR FUCKING EXCUSE!



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    I thought mercurial was better overall, although like most VCSs, it lacks good GUI tools.

    I've recently discovered "SourceTree", which so far seems to be the king of Git and Mercurial GUI tools.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Lotus Notes was designed in, what, 1987? Nobody knew what the fuck they were doing then. (Well, except Apple-- but Apple obviously had no influence over the idiots making Lotus products back in the day.)

    Git was designed in 2005. WHAT IS THEIR FUCKING EXCUSE!

    I'm convinced that git is just a 1:1 port of Linus Torvald's personal development script directory with some performance tweaks. It explains a lot.

    I've been meaning to try the git plugin for mercurial because that one is actually meant to be a source control system to be used by humans instead of a "stupid content tracker".



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Heroku

    One might say it's time to commit heroku.


    boom tish.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @blakeyrat said:

    Git was designed in 2005. WHAT IS THEIR FUCKING EXCUSE!
    Linus Torvalds is an antisocial jerk who hates sane developers, and who somehow managed to acquire a fan-club.

    Next question!

    (OTOH, github is quite nice. I just wish I could use a nice SCM with it.)



  • @dkf said:

    Linus Torvalds is an antisocial jerk who hates sane developers, and who somehow managed to acquire a fan-club.

    By FOSS "benevolent dictator" standards, Torvalds is quite reasonable and pragmatic. At least he's no Stallman or DHH.. shudder



  • Sorry, but you might want to return your developer certificate. Yes, you're not fit for the experience.

    I mean, you're ranting about two things you absolutely have no clue of how they work and fail at being funny. I bet until a few days ago you we're in SVN land and now you feel fragile and lost.

    And Heroku's documentation is quite good and for the purpose of deploying, is very explicit on how to do it. So yes, maybe the problem is, hmmm, you.

    I have a friend working in McDonald's and he's pretty happy, might want to send him your resume.




  • Much of the branch/merge problem's with git I've seen with git are because it (like most DVCS) is designed for feature branching, small branches which change a specific thing (usually adding a feature, but can also be e.g. a larger bugfix).

    Do you have to agree with this? No. But if you use this system then git (and other DVCS) are better at branching, this type of thing is hard to achieve in e.g. subversion and you're more likely to run into problems.

    If you keep your large, divergent branches like you usually would in CVCS then git (and other DVCS) can still fuck up merging. They never claim they are infallible, simply that they are better.



  • @Adanine said:

    "Error 3:10"
    Book of Errors, Chapter 3, Verse 10: "And the Angel spoke: 'Thou shalt not try to dereference a Pointer of Null, for it is an Abomination to the Lord!'".

    HTH.



  •  The next git thread should be named "I'm gonna git you sucka".



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    I thought mercurial was better overall, although like most VCSs, it lacks good GUI tools. (The Tortoise stuff for Windows is okay, but it still feels clunky.)

    TortoiseHg is probably the best source control GUI there is. GitHub's client looks a lot prettier, but doesn't work... as blakey has discovered (again).

    @Aeolun said:

    I've recently discovered "SourceTree", which so far seems to be the king of Git and Mercurial GUI tools.

    After being forced to use JIRA, I refuse to use anything Atlassian makes on principle. I just wish they'd never acquired BitBucket.

    @ubersoldat said:

    mindless trolling

    blakey likes his tools to work out of the box, i.e. without having to jump through half-a-dozen hoops to get them into a working state post-install. Strangely enough, so do most competent and productive developers! This is where Mercurial body-slams Git through concrete, because you don't have to worry about setting up the "remote" repo and an SSH key with Hg, it just fucking works.



  • Git supports smart HTTP protocols and HTTP auth, just like Mercurial - it's just that most hosting providers choose not to implement it for some reason.

    My only complaint about git defaults is that "color.ui" isn't enabled at install time.

    Oh, and Blakey? Next time you're having trouble with something, try, oh I dunno, asking for help. There are plenty of people who would love to help you get through your work, and your difficulties will help them understand what needs to be changed to make it more user friendly. irc://chat.freenode.net/#git is exceptionally helpful.



  • @ubersoldat said:

    I mean, you're ranting about two things you absolutely have no clue of how they work and fail at being funny.

    I do know how they work: poorly.

    (Was that funny? OH GOD TELL ME THAT WAS FUNNY! I NEED YOUR VALIDATION UBERSOLDAT!)

    @ubersoldat said:

    I bet until a few days ago you we're in SVN land and now you feel fragile and lost.

    I've been using Git now for something like 9 months, and I'm still "fragile and lost" because it literally has the worst usability of any, ANY, developer tool I've used. And it's not just the CLI thing: I used to do shitloads of data munging in Awk and Awk is, no shitting, a more friendly experience than Git. (That said: it's still shit.)

    Hell, like I've said in previous posts: I'd rather be using Lotus Notes than Git. Why? Because it's obvious the guys who work on Lotus Notes *try* to make it usable. (They fail, they fail hard, but at least they're trying. Git doesn't even try.)

    @ubersoldat said:

    And Heroku's documentation is quite good and for the purpose of deploying, is very explicit on how to do it.

    Oh so you can point out where in their instructions it mentions pasting your SSL public key into the "User" section of their website. Maybe it's just in itsy-bitsy text and I missed it. Of course let's not lose the focus here: that deployment would have gone a lot smoother (ignoring Heroku's broken, wrong directions) if Git had returned a USEFUL error message.

    @ubersoldat said:

    So yes, maybe the problem is, hmmm, you.

    I think the problem is an infusion of moron open source-trained developers who couldn't recognize a good development tool if it jumped up and bit them in the ass. I think the problem is people out there who genuinely think that CLI interfaces are more efficient than GUI interfaces for the same tasks (no scientific study has ever shown this to be true). I think the problem is people who think debugging with printf is "just fine" and don't need anything better. I think the problem is people who don't see the advantage of having all of a project's files and dependencies tracked in a single IDE project file.

    In short, I think new programmers are learning it wrong and doing it wrong. And if they're using Git as a day-to-day example of how software "ought to behave", imagine how shitty the software they themselves are writing will be.

    (Not that Visual Studio/Team Foundation Server does everything right. But they're sitting up at the "95% right" level while Git is maybe at the "20% right" level. The best thing you can say about Git is that once you figure out the magical incantations it works a large proportion of the time.)



  • @Circuitsoft said:

    Oh, and Blakey? Next time you're having trouble with something, try, oh I dunno, asking for help.

    GitHub's response time is like 3 business days. I needed that shit on Heroku post-haste.

    In their defense, when they do respond to support requests, they're pretty useful. But the response is always, "oh yeah that's a bug in our shitty-ass product that's shitty, try wiping out the repo and checking it out again" which is something I can do without wasting time writing an email.

    @Circuitsoft said:

    There are plenty of people who would love to help you get through your work, and your difficulties will help them understand what needs to be changed to make it more user friendly.

    ROFL.

    Yeah right. I've already delivered a laundry list of what's wrong with Git to the aforementioned GitHub support people. They know their product is shit, at least if they have the mental ability to break through its Apple-esque reality distortion field.

    But do you honestly believe, deep in your heart believe, that any argument on improvements to be made to Git, no matter how well-argued, would result in changes to the product? Because I don't believe that, and it's certainly not been demonstrated to me to be the case. (On the contrary: there are dozens of other tools that now depend on Git *not* changing, because of the weird and extremely stupid open source habit of creating a UI for a program by *having it call the CLI version of that program*. WTF.)

    You prove to me, 100% prove to me, that my input has even the slightest, remotest chance of causing a change in Git, and I'll write up 500 bug reports gladly. Gladly! But until I've been shown, it would be a waste of my time.

    @Circuitsoft said:

    irc://chat.freenode.net/#git is exceptionally helpful.

    I'm sorry, my timepod only goes forward. I can't go back to 1998 when IRC was still relevant. Do any Git fans use technology that's popular in the 21st century? You know... modern techno-- haha! What am I saying! They build the Git UI, they probably honestly think it's still 1983. (Or: STUCK TIMEPOD! GASP!)

    ---

    BTW as an update to the first post, I found out late yesterday that my co-worker who was managing this product was *also* pushing to production from the "develop" branch-- because he *also* couldn't get the branch merge to work. Hah!



  • @blakeyrat said:

    I think the problem is an infusion of moron open source-trained developers who couldn't recognize a good development tool if it jumped up and bit them in the ass

    I still cringe when one of the old-time programmers here wants to show me something in our legacy Java program (700+ class files, 440K lines/144K code) and trots out gvim.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Circuitsoft said:
    irc://chat.freenode.net/#git is exceptionally helpful.

    I'm sorry, my timepod only goes forward. I can't go back to 1998 when IRC was still relevant. Do any Git fans use technology that's popular in the 21st century?

    Name a 21st century technology used for chat rooms. Chat rooms are fantastic for support and development, and complement forums extremely well. Would you prefer Freenode Webchat?

    Oh, there's also Git for human beings on Google Groups.



  • @Circuitsoft said:

    Name a 21st century technology used for chat rooms.

    Huh? Hundreds. But what's the relevance?

    @Circuitsoft said:

    Chat rooms are fantastic for support and development,

    Yeah I used to believe that was true. The last 5 or 10 times I tried to use a chatroom for "support and development", it was useless and frustrating and the people were assholes. (And I can't imagine someone liking Git and not being an asshole.) Look, if I bang my head against a wall 10 times and it hurts, I'm not going to bang my head against the wall an 11th time.

    @Circuitsoft said:

    Oh, there's also Git for human beings on Google Groups.

    That might be more useful. Although I'm sure it's still full of assholes.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Circuitsoft said:
    Name a 21st century technology used for chat rooms.

    Huh? Hundreds. But what's the relevance?

    InB4GoogleHangouts: Hundreds that actual people use?

    I assume the relevance is that someone suggested that you try using a useful technology that many people use all the time for real time help and answers. It may surprise you, but people other than the actual provider may know what your problem is and how to solve it. Or perhaps you can explain why it isn't relevant with an actual reason? Ha ha ha...I crack myself up sometimes.

    That's enough reason for today...you can go back to ranting instead of learning how to solve problems now.



  • Look.

    I find it hard to believe that a group of developers who create an entire product without giving even a tiny iota of a shit as to whether human beings could actually use the fucking thing or not would suddenly care because one of their victims popped up in a chat room and said, "hey you guys, could I get some help?"

    What do you imagine they'd respond? "Oh yeah! We created this shitty, unusable product and gave it to millions of people and don't have a regret in the world but now suddenly here's some random dude in a chatroom? NOW I CARE THAT IT'S SHIT! I HAVE COMPLETELY CHANGED MY MIND AND WILL FIX EVERYTHING POST-HASTE!"

    No. That is not what would happen. What would happen is: "you're an idiot if you can't figure it out, go away." Circuitsoft is delusional if he thinks otherwise.

    If Git developers cared even slightly for their product, it would have been fixed sometime between 2005 and today. They do not. Telling them about problems with a product they demonstrably don't give a shit about would just be a waste of time.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    No. That is not what would happen. What would happen is: "you're an idiot if you can't figure it out, go away." Circuitsoft is delusional if he thinks otherwise.

    Yes. Your shoulder aliens totally trump experience. And reading. We understand.



  • @The_Assimilator said:

    blakey likes his tools to work out of the box, i.e. without having to jump through half-a-dozen hoops to get them into a working state post-install. Strangely enough, so do most competent and productive developers! This is where Mercurial body-slams Git through concrete, because you don't have to worry about setting up the "remote" repo and an SSH key with Hg, it just fucking works.

     

    What if, to quote Joel Spolsky, "the abstractions leak"? SVN or TFS work really great out-of-the-box, but what do you do when a file is locked somewhere and the only error message tells you to fuck off? At least he learned a "valuable" "lesson" on how git seems to work internally, and can deal with the insane breakage that seems to occur twice-daily. Before you know he'll put "git-expert" on his resume.

     



  •  @morbiuswilters said:

    I like git more than svn or cvs, but sometimes it just shits itself. Or you'll try to do a rebase or something to fix your history and: BAM! lost all your shit. (I always create a local backup before trying a rebase or anything similarly complicated.)

    I thought mercurial was better overall, although like most VCSs, it lacks good GUI tools. (The Tortoise stuff for Windows is okay, but it still feels clunky.) I don't understand why there isn't some VCS out there that started with a good GUI. I mean, managing lots of complex branches and revisions and merging is ultimately a task which lends itself very well to a visual interface, but instead we work off text labels and SHA-1 hashes..

    Why don't you use one of the commercial VCSs? They must be so much better...



  • @derari said:

    Why don't you use one of the commercial VCSs? They must be so much better...

    Unfortunately it's not something I have a choice in. If I was a Windows developer, I'd look at stuff like TFS, but it's pretty much pointless for me to worry about the green-ness of the grass elsewhere.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @derari said:
    Why don't you use one of the commercial VCSs? They must be so much better...

    Unfortunately it's not something I have a choice in. If I was a Windows developer, I'd look at stuff like TFS, but it's pretty much pointless for me to worry about the green-ness of the grass elsewhere.

    We use TFS here, and meanwhile I yearn for the green grass of any DCVS.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    I like git more than svn or cvs, but sometimes it just shits itself. Or you'll try to do a rebase or something to fix your history and: BAM! lost all your shit. (I always create a local backup before trying a rebase or anything similarly complicated.)

    Instead of creating a backup of your repo, you can also just create a backup of your branch (e. g. another branch pointing at the same commit - or even copy the commit hash to some text file) so that you can reset back in case it breaks.

    In fact, you can use "git reflog" which will print the last locations you had checked out, and then just reset to one of those, so you do not have to create a backup beforehand. (Only thing, make sure your branches are ok before you run "git gc").

    And yes, I do admit that the (official command line) "UI" sucks and that graphical UIs for git break too much and are lost too often so you are forced back to using the command line, and that in general the learning "cliff" is too steep for git - however, I haven't found any distributed VCS that sucked less (than the git command line), and I have tried a lot of them...



  • @mihi said:

    And yes, I do admit that the (official command line) "UI" sucks and that graphical UIs for git break too much and are lost too often so you are forced back to using the command line, and that in general the learning "cliff" is too steep for git - however, I haven't found any distributed VCS that sucked less (than the git command line), and I have tried a lot of them...

    Then the entire concept of DVCS is not ready for human beings to use. I'm sick of these shitty open source dumbshits (and yes Linus Torvalds included) writing 1/3rd of a fucking software product, then shoving it out the door as if it's "done", then refusing to fix any of its shortcomings for decade after decade. In a just universe, GitHub would be bankrupt, Git would be virtually unused, and mentioning its name to a developer would produce the same kind of disgusted groans as mentioning XKCD around here does.

    I guess the open source community really takes that essay "worse is better" to heart.



  • @mihi said:

    Instead of creating a backup of your repo, you can also just create a backup of your branch (e. g. another branch pointing at the same commit - or even copy the commit hash to some text file) so that you can reset back in case it breaks.

    I'd rather have a backup that's outside the repo. As for copying the commit hash to some text file, I have no idea what good that would do when you're trying to remove revisions..



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    I'd rather have a backup that's outside the repo. As for copying the commit hash to some text file, I have no idea what good that would do when you're trying to remove revisions..

    As long as the repo is suficiently small so that copying does not take several minutes, feel free to do so.

    But, even if you "remove" revisions (regardless whether by resetting or rebasing a branch, or by deleting the branch altogether), the revision objects will not be really gone from the repo (or the reflog) until you gc it (and by default gc will not remove objects younger than some small amount of days (I think 7) at all).



  • @joe.edwards said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    @derari said:
    Why don't you use one of the commercial VCSs? They must be so much better...

    Unfortunately it's not something I have a choice in. If I was a Windows developer, I'd look at stuff like TFS, but it's pretty much pointless for me to worry about the green-ness of the grass elsewhere.

    We use TFS here, and meanwhile I yearn for the green grass of any DCVS.

    For someone working in the Microsoft ecosystem there is nothing better than TFS. It's all integrated with Visual Studio, it knows automatically which files to check for, ignore or not merge, etc. CI, builds, tests, bug tracking, tasks management, it's all built-in and can all be linked to each other (e.g.: opening a bug report will bring up the right changeset).


    For a long time the barrier to proper TFS adoption was lousy implementation and the need to access on-premises servers for remote developers (everybody hates VPNs). Now with tfs.visualstudio.com there is no TFS server to maintain, it's all done by Microsoft, it's free and all that is needed is an internet connection. I usually interact with TFS only from within Visual Studio but the webapp has some nice features like a task board, reports, etc.



    Source control should not require tedious manual labor.



  • Visual Studio is also better at dealing with Git than anything actually produced by the Git or GitHub teams. Honestly at this point I'm just saying "fuck it" and creating a VS project for my Git projects, even if they're nothing but JS and HTML and don't really require one.

    That merge that was vexing me? VS did it flawlessly the first try.



  • @mihi said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    I'd rather have a backup that's outside the repo. As for copying the commit hash to some text file, I have no idea what good that would do when you're trying to remove revisions..

    As long as the repo is suficiently small so that copying does not take several minutes, feel free to do so.

    But, even if you "remove" revisions (regardless whether by resetting or rebasing a branch, or by deleting the branch altogether), the revision objects will not be really gone from the repo (or the reflog) until you gc it (and by default gc will not remove objects younger than some small amount of days (I think 7) at all).

    Sure, but try recovering that lost history after it's hosed. It's honestly just a lot easier to make a copy of the repo.

    And who cares if it takes 15 minutes? I mean, that's lame, but it's gonna take me more than 15 minutes to fix the history if it gets hosed.



  • $ git reset --hard HEAD@{20.minutes.ago}
    $ git reset --hard HEAD@{2.weeks.ago}

    History will only get really hosed if you constantly expire your reflogs and gc the repository. Default expiration for reflogs is 90 days, so you're not likely to actually lose anything. As for how to access them, see How to specify revisions in a descriptive manner.



  • @Circuitsoft said:

    $ git reset --hard HEAD@{20.minutes.ago}
    $ git reset --hard HEAD@{2.weeks.ago}

    History will only get really hosed if you constantly expire your reflogs and gc the repository. Default expiration for reflogs is 90 days, so you're not likely to actually lose anything. As for how to access them, see How to specify revisions in a descriptive manner.

    Yeah, I know how to do a reset. I don't care if history "shouldn't" get hosed, it fucking does.



  • Okay, so...

    1. you don't understand how to use a tool
    2. therefore the tool must be broken

    Seriously, there's good documentation readily available. READ IT. If you don't understand how ssh works, READ THINGS ABOUT SSH OR STOP USING SSH. If you don't understand how git remote works, type git help remote. If you have a merge conflict, you did something wrong. It is not a bug with Git.

    Stop making these idiotic threads.



  • @Ben L. said:

    Okay, so...

    1. you don't understand how to use a tool
    2. therefore the tool must be broken

    Seriously, there's good documentation readily available. READ IT. If you don't understand how ssh works, READ THINGS ABOUT SSH OR STOP USING SSH. If you don't understand how git remote works, type git help remote. If you have a merge conflict, you did something wrong. It is not a bug with Git.

    Stop making these idiotic threads.

    In the case of most tools, I would agree. However, I make an exception for Git. Git was just made to make your brain hurt.

    Every time you expect it to do something according to accepted conventions, or according to basic understanding of the english language, it does something subtly different, or outright wrong. It then turns out that you missed some obscure parameter, some esoteric branch definition, or something equally unexpected.

    Sure, that could be fixed by reading the documentation. However, there are better tools available where that is not necessary, because they simply work as expected all the time (Mercurial, SVN).



  • @Ben L. said:

    you don't understand how to use a tool

    I understand how to use source control.

    @Ben L. said:

    therefore the tool must be broken

    Git is broken.

    @Ben L. said:

    Seriously, there's good documentation readily available.

    Liar.

    @Ben L. said:

    If you don't understand how ssh works, READ THINGS ABOUT SSH OR STOP USING SSH.

    I never chose to use SSH in the first place.

    Hey, here's a radical thought: when Microsoft releases a network service/application that requires encryption (like RDP, or Xbox Live), it just fucking does it, automatically, without the user having to do anything at all. Why can't these shitty open source tools just fucking do it? It's obviously possible, since Microsoft's doing it. Why hasn't the "vastly superior" open source development process made it work yet?

    @Ben L. said:

    If you don't understand how git remote works, type git help remote.

    Is that the "good documentation readily available"?

    @Ben L. said:

    If you have a merge conflict, you did something wrong.

    In this case it most certainly was something wrong in Git. The merge conflict was with a file that didn't even exist in the merge destination. I have no idea how it became "conflicted". Visual Studio's Git plug-in let me resolve the conflict; GitHub's client just sat there like a dumbshit doing nothing at all.

    @Ben L. said:

    It is not a bug with Git.

    It was for two reasons:

    1) I'm pretty sure it was,

    2) even if it wasn't, if software is impossible to use, that's a bug. That's a FUCKING HUGE RED ALERT GET ON IT RIGHT NOW bug.

    @Ben L. said:

    Stop making these idiotic threads.

    No.



  • @Ben L. said:

    If you have a merge conflict, you did something wrong.

    All those years of experience that you've got are shining through that wise and clever statement.

    @Ben L. said:

    Stop making these idiotic threads.

    Seems like Al Yankovic Jr is all flustered today. Did one of those cat you ass-rape in the shelter snitch on you?



  • @Ronald said:

    Al Yankovic Jr



  • @Ronald said:

    @Ben L. said:
    If you have a merge conflict, you did something wrong.

    All those years of experience that you've got are shining through that wise and clever statement.

    Yeah, really.. I can't tell if Ben L. meant to say something that dumb, or if he's just articulating himself poorly.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Ben L. said:
    Stop making these idiotic threads.

    No.

    Aww



  • @Ronald said:

    Seems like Al Yankovic Jr is all flustered today. Did one of those cat you ass-rape in the shelter snitch on you?

    I'm more concerned for where he's been the last few days.. Do you think he has a girlfriend?


    Or, much more likely, do you think he has a fully-functioning forwards-and-backwards time machine and has been exploring late 18th century France?



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @Ronald said:
    Seems like Al Yankovic Jr is all flustered today. Did one of those cat you ass-rape in the shelter snitch on you?

    I'm more concerned for where he's been the last few days.. Do you think he has a girlfriend?


    Nah. As long as he listens to his mom and think long curly hair are cute he's definitely swinging the lightsaber, probably splashing the underwear section of his mom's Sears catalog.

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Or, much more likely, do you think he has a fully-functioning forwards-and-backwards time machine and has been exploring late 18th century France?

    \Why would he come back at a later day then he left? Is he not using the Primer machine?







    every time I think about Primer my head hurts



  • @Ronald said:

    every time I think about Primer my head hurts

    That's the easy bit. The complicated bit is when they take the one time machine and put it in the other time machine.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Ronald said:
    every time I think about Primer my head hurts

    That's the easy bit. The complicated bit is when they take the one time machine and put it in the other time machine.

     

    I tend to let details like this just wash over me and enjoy movies as a whole.



  • @Aeolun said:

    In the case of most tools, I would agree. However, I make an exception for Git. Git was just made to make your brain hurt.

    I generally agree, though I admittedly haven't used git very much. However...

    @Aeolun said:

    Every time you expect it to do something according to accepted conventions

    The problem with this thread is that blakeyrat has no interest in learning any conventions except for MS conventions. He's not interested in learning about anything else, even if and when he has to use them. But it's amusing because he flames anyone who doesn't fully grasp any nuance of working in a MS environment.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Hey, here's a radical thought: when Microsoft releases a network service/application that requires encryption (like RDP, or Xbox Live), it just fucking does it, automatically, without the user having to do anything at all. Why can't these shitty open source tools just fucking do it? It's obviously possible, since Microsoft's doing it. Why hasn't the "vastly superior" open source development process made it work yet?

    I never have any problem with ssh. So long as I'm not on a MS machine. OTOH, I can RDP from Linux no problem and I can easily get to Windows file shares from Linux. So why can't MS just fucking support ssh like the rest of the world? is the question you should be asking.



  • @boomzilla said:

    I never have any problem with ssh. So long as I'm not on a MS machine. OTOH, I can RDP from Linux no problem and I can easily get to Windows file shares from Linux.

    I regularly rely on doing both, getting to remote Windows file shares using

    ssh -L 4450:server.corporate.lan:445 sshuser@ssh.corporate.com
    sudo mount -t cifs -o uid=me,gid=mygroup,user=winuser,port=4450 //localhost/remoteshare /tmp/remoteshare
    from my home Linux boxes.

    Tunnelling a CIFS/SMB connection over ssh Just Works except on a Windows client, which won't let you use an arbitrary localhost port for CIFS. Windows insists that CIFS over TCP shall only ever happen via port 445, which it grabs hold of for itself on all interfaces at startup. You can work around that, but doing so takes at least as much fartarsing about as configuring a proper VPN which kind of defeats the purpose.


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