Win7 Desktop WTF



  • Got this error today while trying to copy 2 files from network location to desktop. :-D

     Desktopo WTF



  • Rehearsal for Win8



  • 7 and Server 2008 R2 still have plenty of bugs in Explorer's move/copy system.

    No elevation during many copy/move operations. Sometimes you're told that you need permission from $USER to perform an operation, but $USER can't actually enter credentials for you. Other times, copy/move simply ignores folders you can't access, as if they didn't exist, and you're left to fart about with the crawling horror that is robocop(y). (Same as how Properties doesn't include a warning that the file and folder count is incomplete for permissions reasons.) Maybe PowerShell has something as simple as Linux's "cp -r src dest"?

    Still rampant problems with MAX_PATH. For example, the following folder "doc" has a path length > MAX_PATH:

    Right. So in this large folder tree I'm trying to copy, where exactly is "doc"? I can step through the six affected folders, but they all have generic names that occur throughout the tree, and I have no idea which ones have paths that are too long. We're over a decade into the 21st century and we're still saddled with this garbage?



  • Sometimes you're told that you need permission from $USER to perform an operation, but $USER can't actually enter credentials for you.

    I got this one at work a while ago:
    You require permission from Everyone to make changes to this folder

    Another time, it said I need permission from daniell (my user). The file wasn't locked by any other process, and closing and reopening Explorer didn't fix it. Restarting my computer fixed it, though.



  • @Folder Access Denied said:

    You require permission from Everyone to make changes to this folder
    Well, you have my permission. Go ahead.



  • @Daniel15 said:

    I got this one at work a while ago:

    You require permission from Everyone to make changes to this folder

    Ha. That's going to take you a while …



  • @Daniel15 said:

    Another time, it said I need permission from daniell (my user). The file wasn't locked by any other process, and closing and reopening Explorer didn't fix it. Restarting my computer fixed it, though.
     

    Dunno if this helps. Someone suggested it to me when Windows kept locking a video file because it claimed to be in use (seems Explorer thumbnailing the file classifies as "in use"). Never got to the foot of what was locking it, but this tool permitted me to scrub files without reboots/relogins etc.



  • @Cassidy said:

    @Daniel15 said:

    Another time, it said I need permission from daniell (my user). The file wasn't locked by any other process, and closing and reopening Explorer didn't fix it. Restarting my computer fixed it, though.

    Dunno if this helps. Someone suggested it to me when Windows kept locking a video file because it claimed to be in use (seems Explorer thumbnailing the file classifies as "in use"). Never got to the foot of what was locking it, but this tool permitted me to scrub files without reboots/relogins etc.

    It was almost certainly a shell extension for thumbnailing that was written by people who haven't yet grasped the concept of closing files when they're done with them. A lot of stupid behavior that people attribute to explorer is actually due to bad (almost always third party) shell extensions.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @DescentJS said:

    @Cassidy said:

    @Daniel15 said:

    Another time, it said I need permission from daniell (my user). The file wasn't locked by any other process, and closing and reopening Explorer didn't fix it. Restarting my computer fixed it, though.

    Dunno if this helps. Someone suggested it to me when Windows kept locking a video file because it claimed to be in use (seems Explorer thumbnailing the file classifies as "in use"). Never got to the foot of what was locking it, but this tool permitted me to scrub files without reboots/relogins etc.

    It was almost certainly a shell extension for thumbnailing that was written by people who haven't yet grasped the concept of closing files when they're done with them. A lot of stupid behavior that people attribute to explorer is actually due to bad (almost always third party) shell extensions.

    Based mostly on reading Raymond Chen's blog, Win32 shell programming looks like a minefield of "this works now but is not future-proof" and "your application is now responsible for handling [uncommon] situations X, Y, and Z." It seems like there are many subtle gotchas and obscure special cases. It doesn't surprise me that a high percentage of shell extensions are buggy; but what do I know, I develop for the web.


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