Java Beans in Turkey



  • No, I am not posting a recipe, and this is not at all related to anything I'm coding; I'm just curious...

    I've read articles about how the Turkish language is the ultimate litmus test for localization code, specifically the several versions of the letter "i" which don't follow "normal" uppercasing/lowercasing rules...

    So, my question is, what happens if you write a class in Java with a method "getItems", and refer to this method in some xml config file with the bean property name "items"... Then you run your program with a Turkish locale! Will the property mappings completely fail because of the lowercase "i" not uppercasing to "I" like it "should"? Or will Java magically override the locale settings with its own defaults (akin to .NET's Culture.InvariantCulture)? Either choice seems bad - the first will break your program, while the second seems like it would prohibit using certain characters in property names because they wouldn't have anything to uppercase/lowercase to?

    And to think they could have avoided this by just using uppercase in property names (getItems maps to Items, not items) and not messing around with casing...





  • I imagine you would want to use local-insensitive casing if you're writing something that compares to a function in code.


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