We have junit tests



  • A guy on our team just finished coded-and-left-for-an-extended-vacation a major chunk of code. He proudly notified the entire team that he build more than 1,000 JUnit tests for his module. Today, we merged in his stuff, and immediately noticed that test # 1 of his module was failing in the hourly build. Since he's gone, we looked into it, and found a single 10K+ line test method:

    public class MyClassTest extends TestCase {
    public void setUp() { ... }

    public void testMethod() {
    // Test 1: ...
    // code of test 1
    assertFalse(someVariable);

    // Test 2: ...
    // code of test 2
    assertTrue(someVariable);

    ...

    // Test 1320: ...
    // code of test 1320
    assertNotNull(somevariable);
    }
    }
     


  • @snoofle said:

    A guy on our team just finished coded-and-left-for-an-extended-vacation a major chunk of code.
     

    Just how extended was this vacation intended to be, and how extended will it become after he returns from said vacation?

    And are those comments verbatim? If so, that's epic.



  • To be fair, the // code for test n comments are me saving lots of typing.



  • No, you have a JUnit test. When your coworker returns from his vacation, I suggest you explain to him the concept of unit tests.



  • @snoofle said:

    A guy on our team just finished coded-and-left-for-an-extended-vacation a major chunk of code. He proudly notified the entire team that he build more than 1,000 JUnit tests for his module. Today, we merged in his stuff, and immediately noticed that test # 1 of his module was failing in the hourly build. Since he's gone, we looked into it, and found a single 10K+ line test method:

    public class MyClassTest extends TestCase {
    public void setUp() { ... }

    public void testMethod() {
    // Test 1: ...
    // code of test 1
    assertFalse(someVariable);

    // Test 2: ...
    // code of test 2
    assertTrue(someVariable);

    ...

    // Test 1320: ...
    // code of test 1320
    assertNotNull(somevariable);
    }
    }

      Is there always exactly one assertXXX statement at the end of each block of testcase code?  In that case, how about this:

    $ sed < tests.java -e '/assert/=;/^assert/=;s/\(.*\)/@\1/' | \
      sed -e 's/^\(.*\)assert\(.*\)$/\1assert\2\n@  }\n@\n@  public void testMethodXXX() {\n@/'  | \
      sed -e 's/^@//; t DONE ; h ; d ; : DONE ; /XXX/{g;s/\(.*\)/  public void testMethod \1() {/}'
    public class MyClassTest extends TestCase { public void setUp() { ... }

    public void testMethod() {
    // Test 1: ...
    // code of test 1
    assertFalse(someVariable);
    }

    public void testMethod7() {

     // Test 2: ...
     // code of test 2
     assertTrue(someVariable);
    

    }

    public void testMethod11() {

     ...
    
     // Test 1320: ...
     // code of test 1320
     assertNotNull(somevariable);
    

    }

    public void testMethod17() {

    }
    }

    admin@ubik /tmp/tdwtf
    $

    I used line numbers to uniquify the names instead of a sequentially incrementing counter because of the hideousness of doing maths in SED, so that's left as an exercise for the reader...




  • @DaveK said:

    (snip)

    This is how you spend your holiday weekend Sunday mornings?



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @DaveK said:
    (snip)

    This is how you spend your holiday weekend Sunday mornings?

    No, it isn't, for at least two reasons.

     



  • @DaveK said:

    [ . . . ] how about this:

    $ sed < tests.java -e '/assert/=;/^assert/=;s/(.)/@\1/' | <br>  sed -e 's/^(.)assert(.)$/\1assert\2\n@  }\n@\n@  public void testMethodXXX() {\n@/'  | <br>  sed -e 's/^@//; t DONE ; h ; d ; : DONE ; /XXX/{g;s/(.)/  public void testMethod \1() {/}'

    Oops, there shouldn't be a space between "testMethod" and "\1()" in the third line there, that crept in somehow when I rewrapped the lines.



  • So yeah, that's definitely a WTF. But, only because of the implementation. It's not as bad as it could be; at least this guy made an effort to write tests, even if it was wrong through and through. I'd suggest sitting him down when he gets back and giving him a code review on his test: outline the things that should be in tests, including how to write proper tests (multiple methods, classes, fixtures, etc), and then commend him on the things that he did correct: such as the various ways that he tests possible values for his variable(s).


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.