IRA limits: contribute dsdsdsd this year!



  • At the beginning of the calender year I like to review my IRA contributions and allocations. Long story short: I auto-contribute to my (Roth) IRA during the year, then after the 1st of the year I "top off" to my maximum allowable contribution. I wanted to double-check the contribution limit for this year, so I googled. One of the top hits gave me the following:


    [url=http://postimage.org/image/qs5rth8k1/][img=http://s8.postimage.org/qs5rth8k1/ira_limit.jpg][/url]

    I suppose if I made over $173K last year, my limit would be fdfdfdf?

    Bonus WTF: Registering the domain with "2010" in the name. Did they really intend to go out of business after that year?



  • Why are you giving money to the Irish Republican Army?



  • Giving money to the Irish Republican Army might be justifiable. Using Windows XP in 2013 is not.



  • @LoremIpsumDolorSitAmet said:

    Giving money to the Irish Republican Army might be justifiable. Using Windows XP in 2013 is not.
     

    I just worry that I've forgotten to back up something important and it'll be gone when I use this Win8 disc that I hold in my trembling, sweaty hand.



  • Personally I always do a fresh install with a new copy of Windows. It's an opportunity to start clean. I do it roughly once a year too. So... yes, backups.

    Yes, Linux users can find something to boast about, but I'm a gamer and I live in the real world.



  •  I just really want to play AssCreed III.



  • I heard it's not great. AC2 and Brotherhood were my favourites.



  • @LoremIpsumDolorSitAmet said:

    Personally I always do a fresh install with a new copy of Windows. It's an opportunity to start clean. I do it roughly once a year too. So... yes, backups.

    Yes, Linux users can find something to boast about, but I'm a gamer and I live in the real world.

     

    I used to do the regular re-install routine. I decided that my computer needed to work for me, not the other way around.  I didn't re-install every year, so I was always out of practice, needed to re-locate all the drivers, spent time trying to remember what misc. utilities I had forgotten to download, etc. Oh, and where did I leave my OEM copy of XP? Oh yea, I also need to find my service pack CD, etc

    I have a few items that are a real pain to re-install (I need this exact version of CVI for a given customer, not the latest version) along with a few hardware drivers that might finally play nice with Windows 7 (oh wait, the API changed, so if I upgrade to the Win7 driver, I need to spend a couple of days re-writing the utility that talks to that driver, testing it, and deploying it, ugh).

    So, I could spend several hours over several days every year or so re-installing Windows. In addition, I'll have to interrupt my workflow several times over the next few months as I stumble across the little things I forgot to include. For that benefit I'll shave a few seconds off of my reboot time. If I upgrade to Win 7, I'll also get translucent title bars. My payback just isn't there.

    I'm due for an upgrade, probably to win 7. I'll buy a new machine, and will probably end up keeping the XP laptop for testing, given some of the legacy issues I'll need to support for a few years yet.

    Granted, I'm not a gamer, so I don' t need to eke out a few more frames per second to stay alive. I can see the benefit in your situation.

     



  • If you rewrite those drivers to work on Vista, it should work fine on 7 and 8, so it's worth the time.

    Good luck getting your client to upgrade their stuff! As you probably know, XP will stop being supported in 2014.

    For all your bog-standard applications, here's a tool that will save you a lot of setup time for a new Windows build: http://ninite.com/

    You can also speed up the process some more by creating a clean-state disk image and restore that to save you about 30 mins installing the Windows files from DVD and another few hours configuring basic Windows settings to your liking. From there you can justrun updates and get the latest drivers.



  • @RichP said:

    At the beginning of the calender year I like to review my IRA contributions and allocations. Long story short: I auto-contribute to my (Roth) IRA during the year, then after the 1st of the year I "top off" to my maximum allowable contribution. I wanted to double-check the contribution limit for this year, so I googled. One of the top hits gave me the following:


    [img=http://s8.postimage.org/qs5rth8k1/ira_limit.jpg]

    I suppose if I made over $173K last year, my limit would be fdfdfdf?

    Comes from the included http://iracontributionlimits2010.com/wp-content/uploads/shareaholic/spritegen/jquery.shareaholic-publishers-sb.min.js?ver=6.0.0.3.  I guess someone wanted to make sure that their <script> tag was working.

     



  • @RichP said:

    So, I could spend several hours over several days every year or so re-installing Windows.
     

    Or you could have imaged it once you'd got your system build complete and used that as a recovery image.

    I've never really understood this "yearly reinstall" mentality. I have gamer friends that believe nuke-and-rebuilt cleans out accumulated cruft and returns them back to a faster-running OS; I simply perform regular housekeeping to keep mine clean.



  • @Cassidy said:

    @RichP said:

    So, I could spend several hours over several days every year or so re-installing Windows.
     

    Or you could have imaged it once you'd got your system build complete and used that as a recovery image.

    I've never really understood this "yearly reinstall" mentality. I have gamer friends that believe nuke-and-rebuilt cleans out accumulated cruft and returns them back to a faster-running OS; I simply perform regular housekeeping to keep mine clean.

    When I bought my current home PC, I was averaging 35 MB/sec from the disk. After two years of use, that had dropped to 11 MB/sec, no matter which file was accessed or what the system load was. Defragmenting the drive did nothing to help this. Reformatting and reinstalling the system restored disk performance back to 35 MB/sec.

    This is anecdotal, but I have experienced this at work and at home -- it seems to be triggered by writing a huge number of files (tens of thousands) into the same directory. Filesystem performance goes to shit after that and cannot be recovered. I don't know why.

    Most people though do not write tens of thousands of files to a single directory (even in my case it usually isn't something I planned to do).



  • @smxlong said:

    it seems to be triggered by writing a huge number of files (tens of thousands) into the same directory. Most people though do not write tens of thousands of files to a single directory
     

    But pretty much every single computer experiences this hard drive slowdown, so I guess either your trigger isn't significant, or most people do have that many files in a single dir, for example, browser cache, windows updates, and volume shadow copy.

    I any case, it's "accumulated cruft" from software and files, because CPU time and memory usage is always normal and under control, and at any rate, these components do not wear down slowly— when they fail, they fail instantly and hard. But what the exact nature of this cruft is, I don't know. Startup time is affected by having more and more little pieces of software and drivers load up at boot, but that too doesn't explain why old computers perform so much crappier than they should, based on specs.

    Funny story: I brought my work machine back up to speed after crazy slowdowns by warm-installing the latest video card driver.  Riddle me this, donutfuckers.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @dhromed said:

    I any case, it's "accumulated cruft" from software and files, because CPU time and memory usage is always normal and under control, and at any rate, these components do not wear down slowly— when they fail, they fail instantly and hard. But what the exact nature of this cruft is, I don't know. Startup time is affected by having more and more little pieces of software and drivers load up at boot, but that too doesn't explain why old computers perform so much crappier than they should, based on specs.
    Bitrot is well observed and scientifically confirmed. But nobody can actually figure out what in the everlasting fuck causes it these days.

    Common cause back in WinXP would be that the system kept a running count of DMA errors on hard disk access. Once it hit a certain static number (across the entire life of the system), it would disable DMA and it would be unpossible to put it back without a reinstall.

    Vista and later don't use a static accumulator - they use a rolling count, so your shit needs to be consistently shitty to trigger that failure mode, rather than just having the expected error rate and just being long-lived. Supposedly they still bitrot, but I've never observed it. My current machine is 5 year old hardware. Built as Vista, upgraded in place to Win7 as soon as it came out. Still spins over exactly like it did the day I built it, and still does everything modern gaming asks of it without question (IT'S FIVE YEARS OLD, FOR CHRIST'S SAKE. THAT SHOULDN'T BE POSSIBLE.)



  • @Weng said:

    it would be unpossible to put it back without a reinstall.
     

    This is false. I suffered from this once, two computers ago, and I fixed it by removing the IDE channel from the hardware list, then rebooting. The drive was of course still fucked, though, but at least it was fucked in UDMA6.

    @Weng said:

    IT'S FIVE YEARS OLD, FOR CHRIST'S SAKE. THAT SHOULDN'T BE POSSIBLE.)

    Sure it's possible. Consoles are 5-7 year old hardware, therefore modern PCs are leagues and leagues ahead of current consoles. Just wait until the next generation of consoles is out (which should be soon).

    Now, DirectX is something else. My computer should effortlessly run ACIII, but it requires DX10, which doesn't exist for XP. So I'm upgrading.



  • 1) The original WTF was obviously a hex version of the alowable amount, but figuring out the proper units could be dificult....

    2) RE-Install debate:  I wish I had this issue, rarely does my hardware stay current for a full year.....if a machine is being "passed down" and re-configured for a completely different purpose [i.e. apps and data are both no longer appropriate] then clean is [IMHO] the only choice....


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