Try Me



  • Not a tech WTF at all.

    I just noticed the toilet plunger in our office bathroom has a "Try Me" sticker on it. Like you typically see on products at retail stores, encouraging you to try out the product before purchasing.

    The only thing I can think of is some moron making a mess in the toilet aisle of a hardware store.



  •  Strange, the only thing that came to my mind was somebody getting a roll of "Try Me" stickers from some Internet novelty site, and thinking of the strangest thing they could put one on.



  •  Or it's passive aggressive. The custodial staff is tired of unplugging the toilet every day after that one fat cheese eating bastard. So they slapped one of these on as a friendly suggestion that he clean up his own mess for once.



  • I got 2 breakfast burritos this morning and to tell them apart she stuck a vegetarian sticker on one. BUT GUESS WHAT IT WAS CHURIZO NOT VEGETARIAN!

    That WTF is at least as good as the OP's.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    I got 2 breakfast burritos this morning and to tell them apart she stuck a vegetarian sticker on one. BUT GUESS WHAT IT WAS CHURIZO NOT VEGETARIAN!

    That WTF is at least as good as the OP's.

    I agree that it is as good as the OP, but I'm wondering why they didn't have more stickers for different types.  I mean the sticker was on one of two, but the sticker could have been to mark which one wasn't churizo rather than was so it didn't really communicate anything to you (as stated here anyway).



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    The custodial staff is tired of unplugging the toilet every day after that one fat cheese eating bastard.
    IMHO most of the blame should be on the toilet bowl design rather than diet. I never had issues with blocked toilets until I started using US ones. The fancy "use a water stream to generate suction" maybe clever, but the design decision imposes compromises in cross sectional area.



  • @mott555 said:

    the toilet plunger in our office bathroom has a "Try Me" sticker on it
     

    Maybe it was originally intended for a S&M dungeon...?

     



  • @OzPeter said:

    @Lorne Kates said:
    The custodial staff is tired of unplugging the toilet every day after that one fat cheese eating bastard.
    IMHO most of the blame should be on the toilet bowl design rather than diet. I never had issues with blocked toilets until I started using US ones. The fancy "use a water stream to generate suction" maybe clever, but the design decision imposes compromises in cross sectional area.

    What kind of toilet do you use "at home", then? Composting? How else do flush toilets work?



  • @zelmak said:

    @OzPeter said:

    @Lorne Kates said:
    The custodial staff is tired of unplugging the toilet every day after that one fat cheese eating bastard.
    IMHO most of the blame should be on the toilet bowl design rather than diet. I never had issues with blocked toilets until I started using US ones. The fancy "use a water stream to generate suction" maybe clever, but the design decision imposes compromises in cross sectional area.

    What kind of toilet do you use "at home", then? Composting? How else do flush toilets work?

    Flushing of toilets can work in one of two ways to move waste around the S-bend: 1) suction or 2) pressure. US toilets use suction by injecting a plug of water (mainly from the bottom of the bowl) ahead of the waste which sets up a syphon effect pulling waste with it. Other toilets use pressure by injecting the water (mainly from the top of the bowl) and hence behind the waste and pushing it forward. The difference can be seen in that US toilets will totally drain the bowl before refilling to their preset fill level, while other toilets will maintain a water level equal to the height of the S-bend. I posit that the in order to achieve maintainable levels of suction with reasonable water usage, US toilets require a narrower cross section traveling around the S-bend.

    Composting toilets are another thing all together.


  • TRWTF is 95% of the toilets in my country have a trash can where people put used toilet paper, instead of flushing it on the toilet. There is a shared (lack of) common sense that it will cause the toilets to stop working, yet in my whole life I've failed to see it happen.



  • @atipico said:

    TRWTF is 95% of the toilets in my country have a trash can where people put used toilet paper, instead of flushing it on the toilet. There is a shared (lack of) common sense that it will cause the toilets to stop working, yet in my whole life I've failed to see it happen.

    Skip the extra step and POOP IN THE CAN.



  • @atipico said:

    TRWTF is 95% of the toilets in my country have a trash can where people put used toilet paper, instead of flushing it on the toilet
     

    I thought many countries' sewerage systems just can't handle the paper? I have heard that that is common in India.

    In the house that I grew up there was a septic tank so there were restrictions on what could be flushed, even the brand/type of toilet paper, etc. Something about killing the microbes or just blocking up the tank with stuff that won't be broken down properly.



  • @OzPeter said:

    while other toilets will maintain a water level equal to the height of the S-bend
     

    Someone at work the other day managed to block our toilet. Flushing it simply filled the bowl with water. I reckon if the flush was pressed again it would overflow. I went out to the nearby shopping centre to "go", but when I returned the blockage was gone. (I had called the boss but he hadn't done anything about it).

    @OzPeter said:

    The difference can be seen in that US toilets will totally drain the bowl before refilling to their preset fill level

    I've discusses this before: the toilets I have used tend to flush "straight down" since it's basically 100mm pipes all the way, where the US-style spin the water as it drains, due to smaller pipe. (I have used these in Japan)

    @OzPeter said:

    Composting toilets are another thing all together.

    Yes, they work away from where people live and without water. A modern thunderbox!



  • @OzPeter said:

    Flushing of toilets can work in one of two ways to move waste around the S-bend: 1) suction or 2) pressure.
     

    I had no idea that crap technology could be so fascinating.



  • @atipico said:

    TRWTF is 95% of the toilets in my country have a trash can where people put used toilet paper, instead of flushing it on the toilet. There is a shared (lack of) common sense that it will cause the toilets to stop working, yet in my whole life I've failed to see it happen.

    Lucky you. When I forgot in Ecuador I had to find the plunger.



  • @Cassidy said:

    I had no idea that crap technology could be so fascinating.
     

    You new here? This is perfectly in line with all the other content on this site.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @atipico said:

    TRWTF is 95% of the toilets in my country have a trash can where people put used toilet paper, instead of flushing it on the toilet. There is a shared (lack of) common sense that it will cause the toilets to stop working, yet in my whole life I've failed to see it happen.
    Only personal experience I've had of this system (and the reason for it) is on a cruise boat on the Nile - apparently the pipework can only accommodate materials that have passed through the body - anything that hasn't been through the digestive system was required to be placed in bins. Didn't hear of any blockages when I was on there.



    All that said, it appears Saniflo macerators are particularly susceptible to unusual amounts of toilet paper, sanitary products etc.



  • @dhromed said:

    This is perfectly in line with all the other content on this site.
     

    I meant the technology behind Thomas Crapper's livelihood. I wasn't casting opinions about CS.



  • @PJH said:

    anything that hasn't been through the digestive system was simply thrown overboard
     

    FTFY.

    At least, what I witnessed during a cruise down the Nile (three months back).



  • @atipico said:

    TRWTF is 95% of the toilets in my country have a trash can where people put used toilet paper, instead of flushing it on the toilet. There is a shared (lack of) common sense that it will cause the toilets to stop working, yet in my whole life I've failed to see it happen.
    Think yourself lucky .. I have visited countries/societies in the middle east where toilet paper was not even a concept that they considered - the ol' only eat with your right hand type of thing. But I have also lived in a city of 450,000 people in Siberia where the entire supply of toilet paper ran out .. and we had a special delivery fedex'ed in.



  • @Zemm said:

    @atipico said:

    TRWTF is 95% of the toilets in my country have a trash can where people put used toilet paper, instead of flushing it on the toilet
     

    I thought many countries' sewerage systems just can't handle the paper? I have heard that that is common in India.

    In the house that I grew up there was a septic tank so there were restrictions on what could be flushed, even the brand/type of toilet paper, etc. Something about killing the microbes or just blocking up the tank with stuff that won't be broken down properly.

     

    IT's not that. The governemnt imposes that the waste treatment plants be able to deal with the toilet paper. Also, the public waste pipes are required to be able to carry it.

    The only problem is that the construction code doesn't require the house piping to be able to carry the paper, thus lots of people build their houses with piping that can't. Tipical brazilian culture: "The government doesn't require that my house doesn't stink, so I'll have a house that stinks".

     



  • @OzPeter said:

    @zelmak said:

    @OzPeter said:

    @Lorne Kates said:
    The custodial staff is tired of unplugging the toilet every day after that one fat cheese eating bastard.
    IMHO most of the blame should be on the toilet bowl design rather than diet. I never had issues with blocked toilets until I started using US ones. The fancy "use a water stream to generate suction" maybe clever, but the design decision imposes compromises in cross sectional area.

    What kind of toilet do you use "at home", then? Composting? How else do flush toilets work?

    Flushing of toilets can work in one of two ways to move waste around the S-bend: 1) suction or 2) pressure. US toilets use suction by injecting a plug of water (mainly from the bottom of the bowl) ahead of the waste which sets up a syphon effect pulling waste with it. Other toilets use pressure by injecting the water (mainly from the top of the bowl) and hence behind the waste and pushing it forward. The difference can be seen in that US toilets will totally drain the bowl before refilling to their preset fill level, while other toilets will maintain a water level equal to the height of the S-bend. I posit that the in order to achieve maintainable levels of suction with reasonable water usage, US toilets require a narrower cross section traveling around the S-bend.

    Composting toilets are another thing all together.

    Both of these kinds of toilets are widely used in the United States.

    Though they lack the dual flush power levels that Australian toilets have.



  • @Someone You Know said:

    Though they lack the dual flush power levels that Australian toilets have.
    Dual flush is starting to appear in the US. I have toured display/model homes in the last couple of years which have had dual flush toilets and had to put up with the sales people explaining to me (in an over eager manner) what this "brand new feature" was.



  • @OzPeter said:

    @Someone You Know said:
    Though they lack the dual flush power levels that Australian toilets have.
    Dual flush is starting to appear in the US. I have toured display/model homes in the last couple of years which have had dual flush toilets and had to put up with the sales people explaining to me (in an over eager manner) what this "brand new feature" was.

    Yeah, it's totally unknown here. The first dual flush toilet I used, which was in a hotel in Sydney, didn't have the buttons labeled in any way. I had no idea what they meant.



  • I propose a third toilet flushing technology: Air pressure. When you close the lid, it latches down and makes the bowl airtight, except for the drain. Then a built-in air compressor pumps in 100 PSI and forces everything down the drain. Even those with horrible dietary habits who tend to dump pounds of sludge and need three whole rolls of toilet paper to clean themselves up shouldn't be able to plug that.

    And any failure in containment would be...spectacular.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @mott555 said:

    I propose a third toilet flushing technology: Air pressure. When you close the lid, it latches down and makes the bowl airtight, except for the drain. Then a built-in air compressor pumps in 100 PSI and forces everything down the drain. Even those with horrible dietary habits who tend to dump pounds of sludge and need three whole rolls of toilet paper to clean themselves up shouldn't be able to plug that.
    Not too dissimilar to the flushing method used for toilets on planes.



  • @atipico said:

    TRWTF is 95% of the toilets in my country have a trash can where people put used toilet paper, instead of flushing it on the toilet. There is a shared (lack of) common sense that it will cause the toilets to stop working, yet in my whole life I've failed to see it happen.
     

    Once, when I was a kid, I wrapped myself in toilet paper and pretended to be a mummy. After that, I dumped all of it in the toilet - about one whole roll, total. That managed to clog it up.



  • @OzPeter said:

    But I have also lived in a city of 450,000 people in Siberia where the entire supply of toilet paper ran out .. and we had a special delivery fedex'ed in.

    When I grew up in that city, we didn't have toilet paper. Newspapers were used for that instead.



  • @alegr said:

    When I grew up in that city, we didn't have toilet paper. Newspapers were used for that instead.
    I wonder what will happen when the last newspaper goes web-only....



  • @da Doctah said:

    @alegr said:

    When I grew up in that city, we didn't have toilet paper. Newspapers were used for that instead.

    I wonder what will happen when the last newspaper goes web-only....

    I guess you could start using your out-dated iPads.


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