Windows 7 BSOD



  • I just had Windows 7 BSOD on me for the first time. After rebooting, i was greeted by this message:

    It's only a minor thing, but still, where's the 'check right now' button? It says it can check solutions for me, but then only offers a cancel or postpone option... I wonder if I will keep getting this until i somehow remove the error log from some location that i didn't bother to write down/remember

     



  • I think the important phrase is "Microsoft can check online for a solution to the problem the next time you go online.

    It can't check now, because you have no internet connection. So check later should really be "Check next time I get an internet connection"



  •  @mt@ilovefactory.com said:

    I think the important phrase is "Microsoft can check online for a solution to the problem the next time you go online.

    It can't check now, because you have no internet connection. So check later should really be "Check next time I get an internet connection"

     Well, since I'm posting here, my internet connection is just fine...

     



  • @Hantas said:

     @mt@ilovefactory.com said:

    I think the important phrase is "Microsoft can check online for a solution to the problem the next time you go online.

    It can't check now, because you have no internet connection. So check later should really be "Check next time I get an internet connection"

     Well, since I'm posting here, my internet connection is just fine...

     

    LOL

    Now, isn't it "standard" in Windows dialogs that the right most button is always the "OK" one? I think I read about that somewhere.



  • @ubersoldat said:

    LOL

    Now, isn't it "standard" in Windows dialogs that the right most button is always the "OK" one? I think I read about that somewhere.

     

    No. It's [OK] [Cancel] [Apply].

     



  • @ubersoldat said:

    Now, isn't it "standard" in Windows dialogs that the right most button is always the "OK" one? I think I read about that somewhere.
     

    That's like, the opposite of the Windows standard. The standard for Windows dialogs is always "OK on the left, Cancel on the right" (plus other buttons like "Apply" etc.).

    Only programs from the nx culture use the opposite. Those can also be recognized by their using Edit/Preferences rather than Tools/Options.



  • @Medinoc said:

    Only programs from the nx culture use the opposite.
    I think you mean Apple and Gnome HIG.


  • sockdevs

    @Hantas said:

    It's only a minor thing, but still, where's the 'check right now' button?

    On holiday in Tahiti :)

    Seriously though, I don't think it really matters - you've already had the BSOD, so checking now vs checking in ten minutes isn't going to make any real difference. Plus it lets all your startup tasks finish first.

     



  • @RaceProUK said:


    Seriously though, I don't think it really matters - you've already had the BSOD, so checking now vs checking in ten minutes isn't going to make any real difference. Plus it lets all your startup tasks finish first.

     

     

    It lets your other tasks run slower and finds as much as when windows looks for an application to open a file with an unrecognized extension, or when installing new hardware and windows looks online for a driver.

     

     


  • sockdevs

    @squeem said:

    @RaceProUK said:

    Seriously though, I don't think it really matters - you've already had the BSOD, so checking now vs checking in ten minutes isn't going to make any real difference. Plus it lets all your startup tasks finish first.

     

    It lets your other tasks run slower and finds as much as when windows looks for an application to open a file with an unrecognized extension, or when installing new hardware and windows looks online for a driver.

    For the former, you actively opened the file. For the latter, you want to use the hardware as soon as possible. Neither relates to BSOD solution checks.



  • @Hantas said:

    Well, since I'm posting here, my internet connection is just fine...
    Windows hadn’t reestablished the network connection when the dialog came up. It has no way of knowing when it will complete, so it said “check later.”



  • @superjer said:

    @ubersoldat said:

    LOL

    Now, isn't it "standard" in Windows dialogs that the right most button is always the "OK" one? I think I read about that somewhere.

     

    No. It's [OK] [Cancel] [Apply].

     

     

    According to MSDN, the order of the standard 6 kinds of dialog boxes available as far back as Visual Basic in the 90s are:

    [OK]

    [OK] [Cancel]

    [Abort] [Retry] [Ignore]

    [Yes] [No] [Cancel]

    [Yes] [No]

    [Retry] [Cancel]

    Now, applications can put dialogs in any order they want, but Cancel when present has [b]always[/b] been on the right in Microsoft's own programs.

     



  • @powerlord said:

    [...] Cancel when present has always been on the right in Microsoft's own programs.
     

    Except when it's in the middle and Apply is on the right.



  • Your missing [File Not Found]

    Just a heads up.



  • @Mole said:

    Your missing [File Not Found]

    Just a heads up.

    Syntax error on line 18474



  • @superjer said:

    @powerlord said:

    [...] Cancel when present has always been on the right in Microsoft's own programs.
     

    Except when it's in the middle and Apply is on the right.

     

    Or Arabic/Hebrew...

     



  • @bgodot said:

    @superjer said:

    @powerlord said:

    [...] Cancel when present has always been on the right in Microsoft's own programs.
     

    Except when it's in the middle and Apply is on the right.

     

    Or Arabic/Hebrew...

     

    I'm a firm believer that all languages are read left-to-right and some are just written upside-down.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Ben L. said:

    @bgodot said:

    @superjer said:

    @powerlord said:

    [...] Cancel when present has always been on the right in Microsoft's own programs.
     

    Except when it's in the middle and Apply is on the right.

     

    Or Arabic/Hebrew...

    I'm a firm believer that all languages are read left-to-right and some are just written upside-down.
    Except Chinese. Or Tagbanwa.



  • Don't forget Boustrophedon.



  • @christinason said:

    stuff

    Wow, that's the most sophisticated spam bot I've ever seen.



  • <hijack>

    Currently got an issue with Win7 (or rather, Windows Updates) thinking that an ATI driver at Microsoft's repos dated 2009-09-30 is actually newer than the one I downloaded from ATI's website, dated 2012-03-08.

    Last month I made the mistake of not unticking it and after it had "updated" I lost the capability of playing any videos. Luckily I was able to roll back 8.611 (from Microsoft) to the earlier one (8.951, from ATi) and recover media playing.

    I've no idea how Win7 can determine the driver at Windows Updates is newer then the one I already have. It's clear they don't check version numbers, or dates -seems to be "we have the latest. If they don't, they need updating".


  • sockdevs

    It'll be a fuckup on the Windows Update server, incorrectly marking an old driver as newer. Best thing is to report it to MS and hope they do something about it.



  • @Cassidy said:

    Currently got an issue with Win7 (or rather, Windows Updates) thinking that an ATI driver at Microsoft's repos dated 2009-09-30 is actually newer than the one I downloaded from ATI's website, dated 2012-03-08.
    This happens all the time - I think they look at the date when the driver was added to Windows Update. It's not limited to just display drivers either.



  • @RaceProUK said:

    Best thing is to report it to MS and hope they do something about it.
     

    Got a URL? I tried it last week but ended up jumping through a load of hoops to register a live account then a hotmail address... by the time I'd managed to get it all done I'd lost the original forum link (and the link on WindowsUpdates times out)

    @ender said:

    I think they look at the date when the driver was added to Windows Update.

    yeah.. but what do they compare it against to determine it's newer than the one I have?

    Either way, I can't be the only one it's happened to.

     



  • @Cassidy said:

    I've no idea how Win7 can determine the driver at Windows Updates is newer then the one I already have. It's clear they don't check version numbers, or dates -seems to be "we have the latest. If they don't, they need updating".

    Like any good distributor, ofcourse they do check version numbers; that's what causes the problem to surface in the first place. This is very likely fallout from the fact that some idiot none too bright person at AMD/ATI decided that they fancied a change in the public versioning scheme of their video driver packages.

    The minor version in ATI driver package versioning strings should be interpreted as a decimal number now. As explained in an issue on Bugzilla:

    AMD's version number scheme seems to have changed for drivers after Catalyst 12.4. (Which is obviously 12.5)

    Catalyst 12.3 = 8.951.0 WHQL (March 8th)
    Catalyst 12.4 = 8.960.0 BETA (March 15th)

    Catalyst 12.5 is listed as 8.97.0 according to the beta leak over at Guru3D. These have a date of April 18th.

    As is clear from the linked bug, this won't just affect distributors like Windows Update. It also affects programs like Firefox, which retains a blacklist to disable hardware accelerated rendering on driver revisions that are known to produce crashes due to bugs in the driver implementation. It's likely that several high-profile video games also sniff the driver version to provide workarounds for known issues in certain version ranges of ATI's drivers. I'd expect lots and lots of bugs to surface, in particular on older titles.

    (Also, for those running Firefox pre-17.x: it should be safe to just force-enable hardware acceleration and get proper rendering performance again. It requires just a few simply tweaks in about:config and instructions for the process are easily found through Google.)



  • @Hantas said:

    I just had Windows 7 BSOD on me for the first time. After rebooting, i was greeted by this message:

    It's only a minor thing, but still, where's the 'check right now' button? It says it can check solutions for me, but then only offers a cancel or postpone option... I wonder if I will keep getting this until i somehow remove the error log from some location that i didn't bother to write down/remember

     


    Probably because you're not currently connected to the internet (or at least, not when Windows looked.)



  • @powerlord said:

    @superjer said:

    @ubersoldat said:

    LOL

    Now, isn't it "standard" in Windows dialogs that the right most button is always the "OK" one? I think I read about that somewhere.

     

    No. It's [OK] [Cancel] [Apply].

     

     

    According to MSDN, the order of the standard 6 kinds of dialog boxes available as far back as Visual Basic in the 90s are:

    [OK]

    [OK] [Cancel]

    [Abort] [Retry] [Ignore]

    [Yes] [No] [Cancel]

    [Yes] [No]

    [Retry] [Cancel]

    Now, applications can put dialogs in any order they want, but Cancel when present has always been on the right in Microsoft's own programs.

     

    Maybe they're trying to get users to click the Check button instead, instead of the Cancel button, followed shortly by a slashdot bookmark...


  • @Ragnax said:

    Like any good distributor, ofcourse they do check version numbers; that's what causes the problem to surface in the first place.
     

    Thanks for the explanation.. but it still doesn't explain why Microsoft's version number and date (8.611 2009-09-30) is considered a higher ("newer") than my current drivers, which are

    @Ragnax said:

    Catalyst 12.3 = 8.951.0 WHQL (March 8th)

    Still, the numbering system has become a WTF in its own right.

    I still can't fathom out how nVidia do theirs either; the version numbers shown in Device Manager don't match the version numbers shown on their website. I've had to go by dates rather than version numbers.



  • @Cassidy said:

    I still can't fathom out how nVidia do theirs either; the version numbers shown in Device Manager don't match the version numbers shown on their website.
    Take the last digit of the third number in version, and the complete fourth number (and add zeroes in front of it if it's has less than 4 digits). Move the dot between the third and fourth digit, and you'll get the driver version from the website: 9.18.13.623 -> 306.23.



  • @ender said:

    Take the last digit of the third number in version, and the complete fourth number (and add zeroes in front of it if it's has less than 4 digits). Move the dot between the third and fourth digit, and you'll get the driver version from the website: 9.18.13.623 -> 306.23.
     

    Shitfuck! That really is a screwy way of doing it. Why have a simple numbering system if we can make it convoluted as wank?

    Either way, thanks for that info - I'm not certain I'd have fathomed that out (hell, I'm positive I wouldn't since I haven't yet) and that'll help me comparing driver versions, ta!


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