Ruby IDE with integrated debugger?



  • Which one will I hate the least? Any tips?



  • Ok it looks like the choice is between:

    * RubyMine/IntelliJ (as far as I can tell these are the same product, more or less)

    * Netbeans (bleargh, also Ruby support seems to have been dropped and then re-un-dropped? Or something? Confusing.)

    * Ruby In Steel 2 (a Visual Studio 2010 plug-in that looks decent but I wager in reality is pretty unpolished/annoying)

    Pretty dire. Ruby's been around for ages, shocking that there's no really good tools out there.



  • TRWTF is wanting to use Ruby for anything other than TDWTF submissions.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Pretty dire. Ruby's been around for ages, shocking that there's no really good tools out there.

     

     

    Problem is that RubyFolk seem to think their language is so awesome that an IDE would get in the way. So the smart people that want to create or make a plugin IDE for it just get told off by RubyFolk and give up. Sort of like a Doctor in a village trying to cure a disease, and all the villagers keep telling him that they don't want him to cure the disease because it makes them feel superior.

     Pointing out that flakey skin and vomiting blood is a rather thin premise on which to consider themselves superior is usually met with blank stares.

     

    Anyway, I gave Ruby In Steel 2 a quick go around, and it seems to work surprisingly well, but I didn't try it with anything but rather small bits of code.

     



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Ok it looks like the choice is between:

    * RubyMine/IntelliJ (as far as I can tell these are the same product, more or less)

    * Netbeans (bleargh, also Ruby support seems to have been dropped and then re-un-dropped? Or something? Confusing.)

    * Ruby In Steel 2 (a Visual Studio 2010 plug-in that looks decent but I wager in reality is pretty unpolished/annoying)

    Pretty dire. Ruby's been around for ages, shocking that there's no really good tools out there.

    IronRuby was recommended in a recent MS training course I took.

    EDIT: Nevermind, it looks more like a Ruby interpreter to the CLR.



  • @BC_Programmer said:

    Anyway, I gave Ruby In Steel 2 a quick go around, and it seems to work surprisingly well, but I didn't try it with anything but rather small bits of code.

    I think that's my top choice right now for three reasons:

    1) I already know VS very well

    2) I know it doesn't use Java at all

    3) It has a 60-day trial not just a 30-day trial, with any luck in 60 days I'll never have to touch this shit again



  • @BC_Programmer said:

    Anyway, I gave Ruby In Steel 2 a quick go around, and it seems to work surprisingly well, but I didn't try it with anything but rather small bits of code.

    Did you ever happen to need to debug a rake task? I'm having trouble getting rake to run its work through the debugger. Even using the rake window in Ruby in Steel doesn't seem to do the trick...



  •  @blakeyrat said:

    Did you ever happen to need to debug a rake task? I'm having trouble getting rake to run its work through the debugger. Even using the rake window in Ruby in Steel doesn't seem to do the trick...

     

    No, I only tested it with some rather small programs.

     

    I Did find some [url=http://www.infoq.com/news/2008/10/rubyinsteel-personal]info about this[/url], though:


     To run Rake tasks in the free Personal Edition of
    Ruby In Steel, right click your Rails app directory in the Solution
    Explorer and open a command prompt in that directory. Run the rake task
    at the command line then click Ruby/Synchronize to update the Solution
    Explorer.

     

    So much for  an "Integrated" environment....

     



  • Oh sorry, I found another way. Turns out Rake is just a wrapper around a class, so you can make a little "skeleton app" that starts the Rake task using by importing the Rake class, then set a breakpoint in your little "skeleton app".



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @BC_Programmer said:
    Anyway, I gave Ruby In Steel 2 a quick go around, and it seems to work surprisingly well, but I didn't try it with anything but rather small bits of code.

    Did you ever happen to need to debug a rake task? I'm having trouble getting rake to run its work through the debugger. Even using the rake window in Ruby in Steel doesn't seem to do the trick...

    Not sure of IDE, but if you want to debug in Ruby, you need to log to file and check the output of file. Pretty much like you debug PL/SQL, if you have had to and infrastructure team not having budget to buy any fancy tools or if you have fancy tools, infra team not willing to grant access to certain packages.



  • @Nagesh said:

    if you want to debug in Ruby, you need to log to file and check the output of file.

    See the magic thing about debuggers is they help you debug and make this unnecessary.



  • @BC_Programmer said:

    @Nagesh said:

    if you want to debug in Ruby, you need to log to file and check the output of file.

    See the magic thing about debuggers is they help you debug and make this unnecessary.


    When it come to PL/SQL, mere having debugger is not enuff. You need to prostrate yourself before your Holy DBA to get correct permission on packages. Sometime your request get stuck in pile of request and then you learn to rely on other tools.



  • @Nagesh said:

    When it come to PL/SQL, mere having debugger is not enuff. You need to prostrate yourself before your Holy DBA to get correct permission on packages.
     

    Erm... gaining access to the data that you're manipulating is a fundamental requirementto fulfill your responsibilities, irrespective of what debugger (or language) you use.

    You might as well have said "when it comes to updating your CV, merely having a copy of Word is not enough. You need to worship the System Administrator to gain write privileges to your filestore".



  • @Cassidy said:

    @Nagesh said:

    When it come to PL/SQL, mere having debugger is not enuff. You need to prostrate yourself before your Holy DBA to get correct permission on packages.
     

    Erm... gaining access to the data that you're manipulating is a fundamental requirementto fulfill your responsibilities, irrespective of what debugger (or language) you use.

    You might as well have said "when it comes to updating your CV, merely having a copy of Word is not enough. You need to worship the System Administrator to gain write privileges to your filestore".

    Yes sillyness never stopping.

    BlakeyRat read this, you buffoon!




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