They sent me an email asking for my email



  • This has just arrived in my inbox (rough translation):

    " Hi [my_real_name], could you please send me your contact info. subject: work quotation"

    OK, so who the hell is this person? I've never heard of her.



    (Note: it's not a matter of gender, completely irrelevant to me).



    Who gave her my email address? She doesn't mention.

    What is the nature of the proposed work? I have no idea.

    What kind of contact info does she want?



    She got my email address, for god's sake SHE SENT ME A MESSAGE. Contact established.

    There's a way she can let me know what she wants. It's called email.



    She could be possibly saving my time (and hers) if she mentioned the kind of work involved in the project. Maybe the kind of thing she thinks I do isn't the kind of thing I actually do. Heck, by the way it (isn't) described it could involve advanced mechanics, brain surgery, truck driving or playing violins! Why should she use some common sense and just state the requirements? It's too far-fetched of me to expect that, probably.



  • @atipico said:

    This has just arrived in my inbox (rough translation):
     

    There is a pretty new development on the web, and it's a bit scary. Apparently, there are people trying to get information about addresses of other people, and there are other groups that buy this information, which is then used to distribute further unsollicited bulletins, extolling the virtues of often illicit products. Not many people know about this yet, but there is a catchy name for this phenomenon. It's called "beans", after a Monty Python sketch in which the word is often used. Perhaps this is one of those "beans" emails.



  • @TGV said:

    Perhaps this is one of those "beans" emails.

    Possibly, but unlikely. The message was sent in my own language. Most overly complex spam schemes I receive are in English, in my language I get the basic "buy this amazing stuff it will get you rich/slim/superp3nised" or obvious ponzi schemes "work from home making thousands".


    Also, I do freelancing work. Also, there is a lot of HER contac info in the end of the message (but actual content is only that one line I mentioned), in includes two fax numbers, one cellphone number, one landline number, one NEXTEL number, skype username and a (ugly) website for some artistic producer company.



  •  It's called them being a cheap fuckass. They'll get the cheapest possible account on one of the job sites. The search results will only be names, email address and-- that's it. No contact info, no resume.

    So instead of paying to actually see your resume, they email you going "hey, we totes got a job that matches your skills. Send me an updated copy of your resume."

    Steer clear of any company like this. If they can't be bothered to pay for the tools and services needed to do their job, then how well do you think they're going to actually represent your best interests in the job market?



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    Steer clear of any company like this.

    Hmm, that's quite relevant advice and I thank you for that.



    However, I suspect that would be the case if they were a company looking to hire someone for a full-time position, and that's quite unlikely that an artistic producer of some sort wants to hire someone from the IT field.



    Another possibility would be some HR service claiming to get me hired by sending my resume to companies in my field. Not the case either.



    I suspect a previous client must have recommended my work to an acquaintance, who didn't have the clarity of mind to introduce herself briefly and why they think they need me.



    Something in the lines of "Hi, I'm [her name] from [her company], I'm writing you because [my previous client] recommended you. My company is currently running a project doing [whatever] and we need someone to do [something]. Are you available?"



    I am inclined into at least seeing where it goes, considering my latest freelancing job (the 2nd on my short freelancing carrer) has landed via a random tweet from an unknown guy not directed to me -- that reminds me, this story, specially the code, has some huge WTFs that deserve a post of its own. Despite the huge alerts it may soumd, the project was successfully completed and paid on time.



    If it is someone who wants to hire me, they're late. I've been hired last week by the government. Each day is a WTF of its own. (This other story deserves not a single but multiple WTF posts, I'm just to lazy to write them).



  • @atipico said:

    @TGV said:
    Perhaps this is one of those "beans" emails.

    Possibly, but unlikely. The message was sent in my own language.

    Spam emails are usually in English.  Beans emails are trickier.



  • @atipico said:

    She got my email address, for god's sake SHE SENT ME A MESSAGE. Contact established.

    In the past, they'd spam you and take a bounce or NDR as evidence the account doesn't exist. Now, a reply is evidence the account's not inactive. I'm positive somewhere there are people employed as spammer clearing houses for CDs full of email address, attempting to determine which are valid and active accounts.

    (owning several domains as I do, I've wasted time setting up a few mail cross-joins with harvested addresses)

    @Lorne Kates said:

    they email you going "hey, we totes got a job that matches your skills. Send me an updated copy of your resume."
     

    I've often called them out on that, asking what aspect of my skills my potential employer was interested in and to forward more details of the job. I've not really strung that many along, but it's curious to know just how much they'll bullshit you to obtain details.

     



  • @atipico said:

    Each day is a WTF of its own. (This other story deserves not a single but multiple WTF posts, I'm just to lazy to write them).
     

    You know the first sign of apathy in a Govt position is evidence the job has already eroded your soul?

    Start posting immediately. It's possible to reclaim sanity if it's headed off at the pass early enough.



  • @Cassidy said:

    You know the first sign of apathy in a Govt position is evidence the job has already eroded your soul?

    As I've said, I've been there for only a week.



    Any apathy or laziness I demonstrate was already present prior to being hired.

    Believe me, I know myself, approximately, since I was born.



    To be honest, this time I am actually excited at the opportunity of learning new things, as the position involves stuff I've never even remotely done before (another big WTF -- okay, I really need to write that post about it).



  • @atipico said:

    I suspect a previous client must have recommended my work to an acquaintance, who didn't have the clarity of mind to introduce herself briefly and why they think they need me.



    Something in the lines of "Hi, I'm [her name] from [her company], I'm writing you because [my previous client] recommended you. My company is currently running a project doing [whatever] and we need someone to do [something]. Are you available?"

    I sent a reply asking for more information and... BINGO!

    That was exactly the case. It was almost her exact reply.



    Well, the meaning of her reply, although more confused, and unable to clarify much about the project itself.

    If I got it correctly, it involves empowering people (huh?) and they're creating an almanac (HUH? Unless she means "guide" or "manual". And she misspelled it); and they're "throwing the almanac at a blog". You're "webdesign" (sic), right?



    Translation: She probably needs someone to upload a PDF to a static page and design the layout of that page. (but also she probably doesn't know she needs something as simple as that and is going to request something fancy and full of features. Or a blogspot.com account. Or both).



  • @atipico said:



    If it is someone who wants to hire me, they're late. I've been hired last week by the government. Each day is a WTF of its own. (This other story deserves not a single but multiple WTF posts, I'm just to lazy to write them).
     

    Well, the best luck luck for you, you'll need it. It's a bad time to get into Brazilian government... In fact, I'm looking into getting out.

    Working in the government is a nice experience. You'll probably be actualy able to see, touch and administer environments that are bigger than  anything you'll see (or at least touch) at the private sector, you'll experience so deep politics that you'll be able to thrive in any big company out there, and you'll learn to stand on your ideas or perish.

     



  • @atipico said:

    I sent a reply asking for more information and... BINGO!

    That was exactly the case. It was almost her exact reply.



    Well, the meaning of her reply, although more confused, and unable to clarify much about the project itself.
     

    Prime opportunity to craft a response which answers questions she never asked. Let's see if she's Turing-complete.

    @atipico said:

    To be honest, this time I am actually excited at the opportunity of learning new things

    In a Govt position? You do mean "things new to you" and not "modern technology used my my new employer", right?



  • @atipico said:

    Most overly complex spam schemes I receive are in English, in my language I get the basic "buy this amazing stuff it will get you rich/slim/superp3nised" or obvious ponzi schemes "work from home making thousands".

    Used to be the case for me too, but the number of Dutch spam messages slowly increases. Especially phishing, of course. O wait, here is one that cannot be spam. It promises me a 2000% interest on my investment. Bye bye guys, I'm gonna get rich!



  • @El_Heffe said:

    Spam emails are usually in English.

    Or machine-translated to another language. Though come to think of it, most of those I get are phishing.



  • @atipico said:

    <FONT color=#698d73>clientsfromhell.net feelings</FONT>
    And I was about to recommend you go there.  Get everything in writing and make sure she knows that freelancers are not free.  I have a strong hunch that she is going to be worthy of appearing on the clients from hell website.



  • 1. Delete.

    2. Enjoy finer things in life.

    3. Profit.



  • @dhromed said:

    1. Delete.

    2. Enjoy finer things in life.

    3. Profit.

    4. Die in a tragic age-related accident



  • @Anketam said:

    make sure she knows that freelancers are not free
    ... nor lancers, for that matter.



  • @Anonymouse said:

    @Anketam said:
    make sure she knows that freelancers are not free
    ... nor lancers, for that matter.
     

    Nor Freemasons.

    "freely available" != "available, freely". Some people can't distinguish between "free work" and "free of work".



  • @Anonymouse said:

    @Anketam said:
    make sure she knows that freelancers are not free
    ... nor lancers, for that matter.

    What about Crimson Lancers?



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Anonymouse said:
    @Anketam said:
    make sure she knows that freelancers are not free
    ... nor lancers, for that matter.

    What about Crimson Lancers?

     

    They're commies.

    Commies that stab you.

     

    From a slight distance.



  • They're the good guys in the sequel.


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