Not IT-related, but it made me say w-t-f?



  • I have a bad cold - so I took Claritin. They claim it lasts 24 hours. Most cold-drugs seem to be effective for about half of the stated usefulness - at least in my case. About 12 hours later, I took a dose of Nyquil. Big mistake. The Nyquil is putting you to sleep while the (amazingly) still-effective Claritin is waking you up.

    The drugs did exactly what they were supposed to, but it messed me up so badly that I actually said "wtf?" out loud. I guess in the case of Claritin, the manual does NOT exaggerate - good stuff!



  • And in related news, area drugstores report a rash of teens buying Claritin and NyQuil in large quantities.



  • @snoofle said:

    I have a bad cold - so I took Claritin.

    For me, the WTF is that you decided to take allergy medicine for a cold.

     



  • @CDarklock said:

    @snoofle said:

    I have a bad cold - so I took Claritin.

    For me, the WTF is that you decided to take allergy medicine for a cold.

    I know it's for allergies, but in my case, it usually work better than most cold medicines.



  • @CDarklock said:

    @snoofle said:

    I have a bad cold - so I took Claritin.

    For me, the WTF is that you decided to take allergy medicine for a cold.

    They both block the histamine reaction. Same end result, different target market.

    When you let a cold run its course normally, it will take roughly seven days. If you take medication for a cold, you can cut that down to about one week. Just get extra sleep, drink plenty of fluids, and USE UP SOME DAMN SICK DAYS so you don't share with the rest of the office.



  • @Thalagyrt said:

    @themagni said:

    When you let a cold run its course normally, it will take roughly seven days. If you take medication for a cold, you can cut that down to about one week.

    Sweet, so next time I get a cold I can cut it down from one week to one week?

    I think themagni is right - the medications don't shorten the duration of the cold - they just attempt to relieve the symptoms. (I actually stayed home for this one)



  • @Thalagyrt said:

    @snoofle said:

    I think themagni is right - the medications don't shorten the duration of the cold - they just attempt to relieve the symptoms. (I actually stayed home for this one)

    Hrm, that makes sense. I just thought it was funny the way he said it. =)

    Either that, or he was talking abut a metric week <wink>



  • @Thalagyrt said:

    Hrm, that makes sense. I just thought it was funny the way he said it. =)


    Here in Austria, it's a well-known saying.



  • Like "6 of one, half dozen of the other"?



  • @snoofle said:

    @Thalagyrt said:
    @snoofle said:

    I think themagni is right - the medications don't shorten the duration of the cold - they just attempt to relieve the symptoms. (I actually stayed home for this one)

    Hrm, that makes sense. I just thought it was funny the way he said it. =)

    Either that, or he was talking abut a metric week <wink>

    @Grandpa Simpson said:

    <FONT size=2>My car gets forty rods to the hogshead and that's the way I likes it!</FONT>

    <FONT size=2>

    </FONT>



  • While we're on the topic, beware: There are much cheaper alternatives to Nyquil that have the exact same drug in them.  Same effect, same dosage, just you end up funding Nyquil ads.

    And yeah, ALL COLD MEDICINE only removes the side-effects, they do nothing for the cold itself.  In some cases they might make it worse because the user thinks they're better, does more work tiring themselves out more, and so the cold gets a better grip and last longer.

    At one point some of the cold medicines actually put caffeine to counter the drowsyness effect, but last time I checked they quit doing that... in Canada anyway.



  • @snoofle said:

    ...it messed me up so badly that I actually said "wtf?" out loud.

    You actually said the letters W-T-F out loud?  Was there anyone around to point and laugh?



  • @mooney said:

    @snoofle said:

    ...it messed me up so badly that I actually said "wtf?" out loud.

    You actually said the letters W-T-F out loud?  Was there anyone around to point and laugh?

    Yeah - the kids were in the room - gotta sensor what I say. They're too young to get the meaning of the letters: WTF, but I was thinking the spelled-out version ;)



  • USE UP SOME DAMN SICK DAYS


    Most places around here now use "PTO" -- "paid time off." If you're sick, taking a vaccation, stuck in traffic all day, doesn't matter -- it's the same thing. So taking sick days means you have less vaccation. Thus, people go into the office and more people get sick. Clearly, this is a win for the enterprise.



  • @Thalagyrt said:

    @snoofle said:

    I think themagni is right - the medications don't shorten the duration of the cold - they just attempt to relieve the symptoms. (I actually stayed home for this one)

    Hrm, that makes sense. I just thought it was funny the way he said it. =)

    It was supposed to be funny.



  • @Oscar L said:


    ...

    @Grandpa Simpson said:

    <font size="2">My car gets forty rods to the hogshead and that's the way I likes it!</font>

    <font size="2">

    </font>

    <font size="5">Y</font>es, and the speed of light is <font size="3">1.8 × 1012 furlongs / fortnight.
       
    </font>


  • @jesirose said:

    Like "6 of one, half dozen of the other"?
    <font size="5">I</font>s that like, "Deaf in one ear and can't hear with the other?"



  • @Belcat said:


    And yeah, ALL COLD MEDICINE only removes the side-effects, they do nothing for the cold itself.  In some cases they might make it worse because the user thinks they're better, does more work tiring themselves out more, and so the cold gets a better grip and last longer.


    The coughing and runny nose aren't side effects - those are your body's defenses against the cold, washing out the offending organisms from your head and chest. Suppressing them with strong cold medicine may get you to work, but it'll mean you stay sick longer. Caveat emptor.



  • Oh yes, we all love the "you must come in to work no matter how ill you
    are" mantra. While it's only mild where I am, I still do my best to
    subvert the system.



    I will make a show of coming in when ill (only when it's contagious -
    non-contagious illnesses I take sick time for) and do my best to spread
    it as widely as possible (short of sharing saliva with everyone, of
    course). While doing this you must state to as many people as possible
    how wise and intelligent our overlords are to encourage this communal
    sharing of diseases.



    Often I will be sent home by management orders after an hour or so, and
    have it not count against me as sick leave. That way I win twice over -
    (1) spread the word on the evils of spreading diseases, and (2) get to
    keep my sick leave for the real intended purpose of extra holiday time.



    I justify it to myself by telling myself that for the individuals
    infected, I am instead contributing to the effectiveness of their
    immune system!




  • @ammoQ said:

    @Thalagyrt said:
    Hrm, that makes sense. I just thought it was funny the way he said it. =)


    Here in Austria, it's a well-known saying.




    It's also a well-known saying here in Australia.  :)



  • @RayS said:



    I will make a show of coming in when ill (only when it's contagious -
    non-contagious illnesses I take sick time for) and do my best to spread
    it as widely as possible (short of sharing saliva with everyone, of
    course).




    While I don't have such a policy to contend with, you are still my hero.  Fight the power! 



    Not to wish ill on you, but it'd be lovely if you came down with
    something nice and serious and contagious, like measles, and spread it
    all over the company... would serve 'em right!  :)



  • @Rodyland said:

    @RayS said:


    I will make a show of coming in when ill (only when it's contagious -
    non-contagious illnesses I take sick time for) and do my best to spread
    it as widely as possible (short of sharing saliva with everyone, of
    course).




    While I don't have such a policy to contend with, you are still my hero.  Fight the power! 



    Not to wish ill on you, but it'd be lovely if you came down with
    something nice and serious and contagious, like measles, and spread it
    all over the company... would serve 'em right!  :)


    Yay! I've never been anybody's hero before. The real WTF is that you chose me as your hero! :-D


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