Oh, that's normal.



  • <redacted> Ben L, that's normal
    <redacted> That's the garbage collection cycle.
    <Ben L.> wait what
    <Ben L.> that's EXPECTED behavior?
    <redacted> The memory usage goes up, up, up, then gc runs and it goes down.
    <redacted> Yep.
    <Ben L.> not even "it does this but we wish it didn't"?
    <redacted> Nope.
    <redacted> That's java.
    <redacted> That's how a lot of languages look.
    <Ben L.> so allocating 80MB/second and then freeing it is expected?
    <Ben L.> (this is on a 256MB server)
    <redacted> Yeah.


  • @Ben L. said:

    <redacted> Ben L, that's normal
    <redacted> That's the garbage collection cycle.
    <Ben L.> wait what
    <Ben L.> that's EXPECTED behavior?
    <redacted> The memory usage goes up, up, up, then gc runs and it goes down.
    <redacted> Yep.
    <Ben L.> not even "it does this but we wish it didn't"?
    <redacted> Nope.
    <redacted> That's java.
    <redacted> That's how a lot of languages look.
    <Ben L.> so allocating 80MB/second and then freeing it is expected?
    <Ben L.> (this is on a 256MB server)
    <redacted> Yeah.

    Worker processes in IIS have a same design and they have nothing to do with java. Instead of gc it's called "recycling" (Microsoft is greener).



  •  <Ben L.> are you insane?

    <redacted> no, I'm normal. That's how a lot of people think.



  • @SEMI-HYBRID code said:

     <Ben L.> are you insane?

    <redacted> no, I'm normal. That's how a lot of people think.

    but all of them are from SnoofleCo



  • @Ben L. said:

    @SEMI-HYBRID code said:

     <Ben L.> are you insane?

    <redacted> no, I'm normal. That's how a lot of people think.

    but all of them are from SnoofleCo
     

    but every time snoofle manages to smuggle a piece of sanity into his company, one angry insane dev leaves for a company that will value his invaluable ingenius ideas more.

    which means we could mask the question to appear more politically correct: "Were you working for SnoofleCo, by any chance? If not, you should try, they'd really value your insights and opinions."

     



  • TRWTF is only 256MB on a server...





  • @ekolis said:

    TRWTF is only 256MB on a server...

    JAVA DEVELOPER ALERT



  • @Ben L. said:


    <redacted> Ben L, that's normal

    <redacted> That's the garbage collection cycle.

    <Ben L.> wait what

    <Ben L.> that's EXPECTED behavior?

    <redacted> The memory usage goes up, up, up, then gc runs and it goes down.

    <redacted> Yep.

    <Ben L.> not even "it does this but we wish it didn't"?

    <redacted> Nope.

    <redacted> That's java.

    <redacted> That's how a lot of languages look.

    <Ben L.> so allocating 80MB/second and then freeing it is expected?

    <Ben L.> (this is on a 256MB server)

    <redacted> Yeah.

    Could you make your chatlog font a little smaller and harder-to-read please? Thanks.

    Ironically it shows up normal sized when I hit "reply".

    Edit: as for the WTF, now that people can read it without hitting Zoom In 47 times... it doesn't seem very WTF-y to me at all. If that's how the memory manager works, that's how it works. All you should care about is results. For example, I'm guessing you put your dialog there in a PRE tag because that was the technically correct way of copying that into a forum post and retaining the linebreaks. But the result is that nobody could fucking read it. (Admittedly not your fault, but CS's stylesheet.) So that was actually a problem that needed correcting. This memory thing is not.

    Also I'm sure that's some Linux server, but on Windows servers the concepts of "allocating" and "freeing" memory are kind of nebulous, and may or may not result in anything actually changing memory-wise at all except the read-out in Task Manager showing a different number.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Also I'm sure that's some Linux server, but on Windows servers the concepts of "allocating" and "freeing" memory are kind of nebulous, and may or may not result in anything actually changing memory-wise at all except the read-out in Task Manager showing a different number.
     

    The concepts and mechanics of memory allocation on Windows are actually very well defined. Under the hood Windows memory management doesn't exactly adher to these publicized specifications, instead using a few undisclosed optimizations. These indeed are nebulous, but compatible with the publicly available specifications as long as you don't abuse them. Problems invariably arise when software developers over-abuse the manager's actual behavior for performance gains instead of working within the constraints of the specified behavior. It's a bit of a "do as I say, not as I do"-case.



  •  I think you're paying too much or getting too little RAM.

    Your server:

    [IMG]http://i50.tinypic.com/ofblzc.jpg[/IMG]

    Available plans:

    [IMG]http://i48.tinypic.com/6ozqrd.jpg[/IMG]



  • @pbean said:

     I think you're paying too much or getting too little RAM.

    Screenshots of a hosting website

    Except that the stone thing is hardcoded into the panel at this point and it's only for testing so I put it on minimum ram. I'm not actually paying anything.



  •  It's a little ironic that bedrock is the lowest, since it's indestructible and you want to dig to there for the best ores. It should totally be Dirt.



  • @Ragnax said:

    The concepts and mechanics of memory allocation on Windows are actually very well defined.
     

    You stealthy bastard, you!



  • Iron > Gold?



  •  Unless it's gold-pressed Latinum. Then it's worth something.



  • @Obfuscator said:

    Iron > Gold?
    You try mining with a gold pickaxe.



  • @Obfuscator said:

    Iron > Gold?
     

    In the game, gold is a total bullshit metal— except for some of the more elaborate crafts, like rail switches and clocks.

     

    So just like in reality.



  • @Ben L. said:

    <redacted> Ben L, that's normal
    <redacted> That's the garbage collection cycle.
    <Ben L.> wait what
    <Ben L.> that's EXPECTED behavior?
    <redacted> The memory usage goes up, up, up, then gc runs and it goes down.
    <redacted> Yep.
    <Ben L.> not even "it does this but we wish it didn't"?
    <redacted> Nope.
    <redacted> That's java.
    <redacted> That's how a lot of languages look.
    <Ben L.> so allocating 80MB/second and then freeing it is expected?
    <Ben L.> (this is on a 256MB server)
    <redacted> Yeah.

    So, um, you should see what happens to the CPU when the Java process actually *uses* a lot of memory, especially if used memory needs to be close to the Java max heap size...  Not pretty.

    Back in the day, I used to be proud that my scripting language of choice didn't do what Java does for memory management.  Then I learned its dirty little secret.

    As bad as Java is, at least it *can* free memory back to the OS.  Not every language can.  (That having been said, *most* of the languages I've used don't allocate new memory from the OS for every new heap variable, throw them into the 'garbage' once they're done with them, and simply wait for a garbage collection routine to clean them.  For example, the scripting language I mentioned only allocates new memory from the OS if it really needs to.)



  • @tgape said:

    @Ben L. said:
    <redacted> Ben L, that's normal
    <redacted> That's the garbage collection cycle.
    <Ben L.> wait what
    <Ben L.> that's EXPECTED behavior?
    <redacted> The memory usage goes up, up, up, then gc runs and it goes down.
    <redacted> Yep.
    <Ben L.> not even "it does this but we wish it didn't"?
    <redacted> Nope.
    <redacted> That's java.
    <redacted> That's how a lot of languages look.
    <Ben L.> so allocating 80MB/second and then freeing it is expected?
    <Ben L.> (this is on a 256MB server)
    <redacted> Yeah.

    So, um, you should see what happens to the CPU when the Java process actually *uses* a lot of memory, especially if used memory needs to be close to the Java max heap size...  Not pretty.

    Back in the day, I used to be proud that my scripting language of choice didn't do what Java does for memory management.  Then I learned its dirty little secret.

    As bad as Java is, at least it *can* free memory back to the OS.  Not every language can.  (That having been said, *most* of the languages I've used don't allocate new memory from the OS for every new heap variable, throw them into the 'garbage' once they're done with them, and simply wait for a garbage collection routine to clean them.  For example, the scripting language I mentioned only allocates new memory from the OS if it really needs to.)

    long posts, confusing signature and poorly formatted quotes = obfuscated content. ARE YOU A CRYPTOTERRORIST???


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.