Just happened not 5 minutes ago



  • Service provider support: Can I have your external IP? You can visit whatismyip.com
    Me: Sure, it's 8.100.100.100 (not really, but the first octet is correct)
    Support: And that's your external IP?
    Me: ...I'm pretty sure.

    This is the tech who is right now chatting with L2 support about my issue with his company's internal IRC server, instead of just transferring me. I get to hear the lovely sound of him typing for minutes on end, with the occasional burst of laughter from the tech who is apparently sitting next to him.

    Lovely.



  •  You think you're funny, but you're not.



  • I can just imagine the meeting behind that decision:

    "Obviously IRC is better because IRC is computers and transferring is phones and not computers."

    That's how I envision it anyway.



  • I feel like you forgot to write most of the story...? Or am I just crazy?



  • @mott555 said:

    I feel like you forgot to write most of the story...? Or am I just crazy?

    I don't get it either. Is there some kind of missing middle part in-between "are you sure this is your IP?" and "he's chatting and laughing with a co-worker"? Like maybe a car chase sequence?



  • @bezking said:

    internal IRC server, instead of just transferring me.

    Intranet relay chat? And how could he transfer you to an IRC?



  • You remember that sack of rice in China? Yeah, that one.

    It just fell over.



  • Fuck Community Server. I guess I didn't close a tag and the rest of my post got cut. Here's the whole story (it's more like a few little WTFs instead of a big one):


    The reason I called in the first place was exactly one of our users (the COO, of course) was getting a 500 when trying to log into the hosted Exchange solution we have with the provider. None of our other users (on the same server, mind you) were getting the same error.

    So I call and the tech is clueless. His first beef with me is that I'm not an "authorized user" in the company's account, so he didn't want to talk to me. But, I knew the company's credentials to log into the provider support portal, which was where I found the correct phone number to call support. He knew this, and proceeded to give me directions on how to add myself as an authorized user. So I asked him why, if he was telling me how to add myself, he couldn't just talk to me if he knew that I was going to do that. He agreed and said not to do it again. First problem solved, I think.

    The next big issue, as I started to explain in the OP, was the IP address. He asked for it, and I gave it, and he was convinced that this was an RFC1918 IP ("You're sure you didn't get that from IPCONFIG, right?"). After he decided that 8. is not the same thing as 10., 172., or 192., he tells me he needs to escalate to level 2. Fine, I tell him, and I wait to be transferred.

    Instead, I am treated to the sound of him typing away for a few minutes, with the occasional belly-laugh courtesy of his co-worker (this was after sitting on hold for 15 minutes. Get off Cracked.com and answer the phone, dummie). "What's up?" I finally ask. He tells me that none of the L2 techs are responding in his chat, and he asks me to check the provider's public status page for him to see if anything is being reported. You'd think that even an L1 tech would know where his own status site is and have access to it. Guess not.

    Finally, he agrees to call me back (it's been ~30m at this point), and as soon as we hang up the COO calls me to tell me that everything's working. While I'm sitting with the COO the support drone calls me back to tell me that they still have no idea what's causing the problem. I tell him to relax and hung up.


    So I guess that story sucked. Fortunately I work at a place where WTFs are pretty uncommon and thus I suck at writing them. Here's a maybe more interesting one about a Level 3 Communications manager who faked his own death by pretending to drown at Jones Beach on Long Island the other day.


  • @bezking said:

    Fuck Community Server. I guess I didn't close a tag and the rest of my post got cut.

    That's could be the real WTF right there, but that'd be too meta...



  • @dhromed said:

     You think you're funny, but you're not.

     



  • @bezking said:


    So I guess that story sucked. Fortunately I work at a place where WTFs are pretty uncommon and thus I suck at writing them. Here's a maybe more interesting one about a Level 3 Communications manager who faked his own death by pretending to drown at Jones Beach on Long Island the other day.

    That story on the NY Post's site is TRWTF. First, I go to the page and get a JavaScript "confirm" (yes/no dialog), telling me to get their app, so the article will be optimized for my tablet (hey, how about "no", jackass?). Looking at the page's source, I see this (starting on line 191):

    if ((navigator.userAgent.match(/chrome/gi) !== null) && (navigator.userAgent.match(/linux/gi) !== null)){
    	var r=confirm("Download our app to view The Post optimized for your tablet");
    	if (r==true){
    		window.location = " market://details?id=com.nypost.tablet"
    	}
    } 
    

    For those of you not JS-literate and/or unwilling to figure out the code, the site thinks I have a Chromebook, because I'm viewing the page with Chrome, and it's running on Linux.

    Also, it seems you're wrong; according to the Post, the guy is an "unemployed computer manager". Sheesh, next time leave the fact-checking to the pros, for crying out loud!



  • @toon said:

    @bezking said:


    So I guess that story sucked. Fortunately I work at a place where WTFs are pretty uncommon and thus I suck at writing them. Here's a maybe more interesting one about a Level 3 Communications manager who faked his own death by pretending to drown at Jones Beach on Long Island the other day.

    That story on the NY Post's site is TRWTF. First, I go to the page and get a JavaScript "confirm" (yes/no dialog), telling me to get their app, so the article will be optimized for my tablet (hey, how about "no", jackass?). Looking at the page's source, I see this (starting on line 191):

    if ((navigator.userAgent.match(/chrome/gi) !== null) && (navigator.userAgent.match(/linux/gi) !== null)){
    	var r=confirm("Download our app to view The Post optimized for your tablet");
    	if (r==true){
    		window.location = " market://details?id=com.nypost.tablet"
    	}
    } 
    

    For those of you not JS-literate and/or unwilling to figure out the code, the site thinks I have a Chromebook, because I'm viewing the page with Chrome, and it's running on Linux.

    Also, it seems you're wrong; according to the Post, the guy is an "unemployed computer manager". Sheesh, next time leave the fact-checking to the pros, for crying out loud!

    And in that same section of code:

    var i_c_val = false; //set to false



  • @toon said:

    And in that same section of code:

    var i_c_val = !(!true != false) == false; //set to a boolean value

    FTFY


  • @toon said:

    Also, it seems you're wrong; according to the Post, the guy is an "unemployed computer manager". Sheesh, next time leave the fact-checking to the pros, for crying out loud!
    How about this:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/03/raymond-roth-fake-death_n_1739627.html @Huffington Post said:

    "A LinkedIn page for Roth said he worked for Level 3 Communications, a telecommunications company. "

    And I'm not even a pro.



  • @Ben L. said:

    @toon said:

    And in that same section of code:

     

    var i_c_val = !(!true != false) == false; //set to a boolean value. But which? We just don't know.

     

    FTFY
     

    FTFY II

     



  • @bezking said:

    The next big issue, as I started to explain in the OP, was the IP address. He asked for it, and I gave it, and he was convinced that this was an RFC1918 IP ("You're sure you didn't get that from IPCONFIG, right?"). After he decided that 8. is not the same thing as 10., 172., or 192., he tells me he needs to escalate to level 2.

    One of my client is using IPs from his public IP block for internal workstations (regular workstations that are connected to the internets via a proxy). And I'm talking good ol' fashion IPv4. The web/mail servers are in the same range, but internet-facing. Endless hours of fun when a new service is deployed and someone (inside or outside) complains that they cannot reach it.



  • @Ben L. said:

    var i_c_val = !(!true != false) == false; //set to a boolean value
     

    The nice thing about that code is that it does not depend on the precedence relation between the ! and == operators.

     


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