Oh those Apple fanboys



  • @Apple insider, 2012-08-03 said:

    The first primary technology advancement Apple will be introducing for iOS 6 Maps relates to the use of resolution independent vector images.

    ([url=http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/12/08/03/inside_apples_new_vector_based_maps_in_ios_6.html]source[/url])

    @Engagdet, 2010-12-06 said:

    The biggest visual change is dynamic map drawing: vectors instead of flat images that scale without render hiccups

    ([url=http://www.engadget.com/2010/12/06/google-maps-for-mobile-5-unveiled-adds-dynamic-map-drawing-and/]source[/url])

    To be fair, if all of their map data is indeed vector it will be an improvement over the current state of Google Maps (which is still converting their maps to vector), but I highly doubt it will be (when released) as complete and accurate as Google Maps.



  • It's actually pretty bang on around where I live. Turn by Turn in Canada is an awesome feature and it works really well with rerouting and everything. No 3D view around me, but the maps load super fast and it works really well.

    It's not a downgrade from Google Maps at all. Earlier releases were, but now it's gained functional parity (and actually more features than Google Maps had in iOS 5).



  • @dtech said:

    @Apple insider, 2012-08-03 said:
    The first primary technology advancement Apple will be introducing for iOS 6 Maps relates to the use of resolution independent vector images.

    Always good to see anyone dealing with this. I guess Apple has to do it now, what with their massive "retina" wankfest.

    @dtech said:

    (source)

    @Engagdet, 2010-12-06 said:

    The biggest visual change is dynamic map drawing: vectors instead of flat images that scale without render hiccups

    (source)

    It's hard to be angry about good vector image rendering. Fucked if I can think of a downside.

    @dtech said:


    To be fair, if all of their map data is indeed vector it will be an improvement over the current state of Google Maps (which is still converting their maps to vector), but I highly doubt it will be (when released) as complete and accurate as Google Maps.

    Well yeah. Having maps is rather important in rendering maps.

    What the fuck is your point? Someone's releasing something and it may not be perfect on day one? Can you find someone near you to smack you in the back of the head? It just might help.



  • @_gaffer said:

    What the fuck is your point? Someone's releasing something and it may not be perfect on day one? Can you find someone near you to smack you in the back of the head? It just might help.

    Apple haters haters, what a boring tribe



  • @dtech said:

    I highly doubt it will be (when released) as complete and accurate as Google Maps.

    IIRC it'll be data from TomTom. No idea as to its accuracy, but given that they're a major player in navigation systems I'm willing to give them the benefit of the doubt.



  • @_gaffer said:

    What the fuck is your point? Someone's releasing something and it may not be perfect on day one? Can you find someone near you to smack you in the back of the head? It just might help.

    No, I was amused that a news site proclaimed feature x "The first primary technology advancement" while a competitor already had that feature for more than a year.



  • @Apple insider, 2012-08-03: said:

    The first primary technology advancement Apple will be introducing for iOS 6 Maps relates to the use of resolution independent vector images.

    @dtech said:

    No, I was amused that a news site proclaimed feature x "The first primary technology advancement" while a competitor already had that feature for more than a year.
    I interpret what they wrote just as "the main tech difference from this version of Maps to the one before is that now maps are vectorial". Doesn't sound like they're fanboying Apple at all.



  • @Zecc said:

    I interpret what they wrote just as "the main tech difference from this version of Maps to the one before is that now maps are vectorial". Doesn't sound like they're fanboying Apple at all.

    I agree that it's somewhat ambiguous, at least without reading it in context, which would disqualify me from commenting, so I've abstained. In any case, the residual RDF may cause the sort of person interested in a site called "Apple Insider" to believe that any advance in iTech must be a real technological breakthrough. I can understand why the author wouldn't want to cause any iCognitiveDissonance, as that's bad for ad impressions. Leaving the ambiguity gives him and his readers an out. Call it iDoublespeak.

    Now I have to finish filling in last night's hole in the back yard before it gets too hot.



  • @boomzilla said:


    Now I have to finish filling in last night's hole in the back yard before it gets too hot.

    So you ran out of space in the basement? Just like John Wayne Gacy.



  • @dtech said:

    @_gaffer said:
    What the fuck is your point? Someone's releasing something and it may not be perfect on day one? Can you find someone near you to smack you in the back of the head? It just might help.

    No, I was amused that a news site proclaimed feature x "The first primary technology advancement" while a competitor already had that feature for more than a year.

    Aah, now I get it. It is amazing how many times a feature can be introduced and still get thrown about as "NEW" by all and sundry.

    Apple has a real skill for shouting their smallest achievements to the world. It may not make for better technology, but it's impressive in a way.



  • @Gurth said:

    TomTom

    I bought a TomTom standalone GPS a few years ago. You know why I chose TomTom over NavMan, Garmin, etc? Because of the legal action Microsoft took against them (FAT patent). If it wasn't for that Streisand effect they'd have less of a point of difference, for me.



  • WTF double post?



  • @Zemm said:

    WTF double post?
    nah, not a WTF.

    The thing that distracted you and caused you to post twice? Yeah. I'm going to have nightmares.



  • @_gaffer said:

    It is amazing how many times a feature can be introduced and still get thrown about as "NEW" by all and sundry.

    Microsoft "discovered" the concepts of Entity Framework (basically ORM) and MVC 10 years after EJB and servlets were widely used in Java. Now THAT is innovation.



  • @dtech said:

    @_gaffer said:
    What the fuck is your point? Someone's releasing something and it may not be perfect on day one? Can you find someone near you to smack you in the back of the head? It just might help.

    No, I was amused that a news site proclaimed feature x "The first primary technology advancement" while a competitor already had that feature for more than a year.

    ... and all the other competitors always all the 12 years the business exists (since GPS became available for civilian use in sufficient quality in 2000). All the offline navigations always stored the map in vector format. It's just much smaller that way. It's only Google that made navigation with rendered bitmap maps, because they access the data over network and the server already had the rendered images handy.



  • @Gurth said:

    TomTom

    TeleAtlas (the company making maps that TomTom bought) used to be the market leader, but than Navteq outran them in mapping eastern Europe and since than TomTom is just trying to catch up on Navteq and Google (who started out with data partly from TeleAtlas and partly from various local providers, but now does lot of mapping themselves).



  • @Bulb said:

    It's only Google that made navigation with rendered bitmap maps, because they access the data over network and the server already had the rendered images handy SVG rendering had serious performance issues or was not supported by the browser or platform.

    Corrected that for you...



  • @Ragnax said:

    @Bulb said:
    It's only Google that made navigation with rendered bitmap maps, because they access the data over network and the server already had the rendered images handy SVG rendering had serious performance issues or was not supported by the browser or platform.

    Corrected that for you...

     

    SVG != Vector. E.g. flash is readily available and fast enough, and uses vector graphics.

     



  • @dtech said:

    ¬(Vector → SVG)
    FTFY



  • @Zecc said:

    @dtech said:
    ¬(Vector → SVG)
    FTFY

    Thank you, that was also bothering me.



  • @dtech said:

    SVG != Vector. E.g. flash is readily available and fast enough, and uses vector graphics.

    Flash is not supported on Apple devices, which cuts out some of the most likely techies to use Google Maps on the go. Also, at the time Flash on mobile was horribly, horribly slow. Even on desktop its performance with regards to realtime vector drawing wasn't much better. As Flash performance improved (most notably through hardware acceleration; the same thing that now makes SVG render at acceptable speed), Google briefly did have a Flash API for Maps, but last I checked it was officially deprecated and slated for a fast burial.

    You have to admit; the full explanation doesn't quite have the same snap to it as the insert/delete quip, does it?


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