Of all the builds to fail...





  •  Full stops are important.

    Just ask any COBOL programmer.

     



  • @Cassidy said:

     Full stops are important.

    Comments, doubly so.

     



  • Care to explain this for those of us who have no clue what we are looking at?



  • Eyes RIGHT, cadet.



  • I think that's the point of the WTF, that's actually all of the information that he's got to go on...

    Pretty grim really :-S



  • @Cassidy said:

    Eyes RIGHT, cadet.

    I got that, but why is it funny?  Should it not have failed?  Is it machine generated or human generated?  More questions than answers...



  • @C-Octothorpe said:

    I got that, but why is it funny?  Should it not have failed?  Is it machine generated or human generated?  More questions than answers...

    You cannot possibly be as dense as you act. It's screamingly obvious that the build was manually failed by some officious Vogon-channeling twit.

     

    For those of you who don't speak British, a "full stop" is a period. Someone failed a build because a comment was missing a period.



  • @Zylon said:

    For those of you who don't speak British, a "full stop" is a period. Someone failed a build because a comment was missing a period.

    Can you use "full stop" when refering to a period that is for a decimal marker rather than end of sentence?  As at least then the comment could have been significantly wrong.



  • @locallunatic said:

    Can you use "full stop" when refering to a period that is for a decimal marker rather than end of sentence? 
     

    Yup. We (Limeys) call that a "dot", or a "point" when reading out decimal numbers.



  • Each line is a build following a commit of some changes. The commit that caused a failed build had a description of "Add missing full stop to comment."Go Figure.

     



  • I see that now, I couldn't see the full image on my tablet earlier so I just saw "os: add m".

    I'm looking again now and the overflow is hidden so it gives the impression that there isn't anything more to see.



  • First result for the commit number is the commit on Google.



  • @Ben L. said:

    First result for the commit number is the commit on Google.

    Ha!

    @diff said:


    -// A FileInfo describes a file and is returned by Stat and Lstat
    +// A FileInfo describes a file and is returned by Stat and Lstat.

    Take that, Test Driven Development!



  • @Zylon said:

    @C-Octothorpe said:

    I got that, but why is it funny?  Should it not have failed?  Is it machine generated or human generated?  More questions than answers...

    You cannot possibly be as dense as you act. It's screamingly obvious that the build was manually failed by some officious Vogon-channeling twit.

     

    For those of you who don't speak British, a "full stop" is a period. Someone failed a build because a comment was missing a period.

    Nope.



  • @Cassidy said:

    @locallunatic said:

    Can you use "full stop" when refering to a period that is for a decimal marker rather than end of sentence? 
     

    We (Limeys) call that a "dot", or a "point" when reading out decimal numbers.

    i.e. You can't use "full stop" in this case, you use "point".

    @Cassidy said:

    Yup.

    i.e. Nope.



  • @robbak said:

    Go Figure.

    From the linked build log:

    # runtime/cgo
    In file included from /usr/include/errno.h:29:0,
                     from cgo.go:31:
    /usr/include/features.h:324:26: fatal error: bits/predefs.h: No such file or directory
    compilation terminated.
    

    It looks like the failure had nothing to do with the change, and (scarily) a lot to do with instability in the underlying build environment.



  • @Zylon said:

    For those of you who don't speak English, a "full stop" is a period.
    FTFY.

    Anyway, those not speaking English, or at least proper English, are the American colonies. Things have gone downhill ever since their purported independence.

     



  • @Severity One said:

    @Zylon said:
    For those of you who don't speak English, a "full stop" is a period.

    FTFY.

    Anyway, those not speaking English, or at least proper English, are the American colonies. Things have gone downhill ever since their purported independence.

    I'm currently reading The Mother Tongue, which discusses the history of the English language. Some of the more amusing bits talk about British snobbishness in reaction to things Americans say or write which the Brits believe have been created by Americans. Often, however, the words had been used in Britain before (even in Shakespeare's plays) but had fallen out of use in Britain. From Google Books:

    @page 173-174 said:
    To this day (1989) you can find authorities in Britain attacking such vile "Americanisms" as maximize, minimize, and input, quite unaware that the first two were coined by Jeremy Bentham more than a century ago and the last appeared more than 600 years ago in Wycliffe's translation of the Bible. Loan as a verb (rather than lend) is often criticized as an Americanism, when in fact it was first used in England a full eight centuries ago.

    I think they just miss being the most influential English speaking country. And they should leave silly language snobbishness to the French.



  • @boomzilla said:

    I think they just miss being the most influential English speaking country.

    It's a size thing.

    Being such a small nation, we're a pipsqueak voice piping up "bu..bu..but.. WE thought of it FIRST!" that's lost amid larger nations that take the credit. If we had more land, perhaps we'd have a larger clout.

    As it is, we've gotta get by on quirkiness and quintessentialism and silently take it up the arse without complaining in the proud traditions of "stiff upper lip". What bollocks.

    @boomzilla said:

    And they should leave silly language snobbishness to the French.

    We have two fingers and we can fire a bow.

    We have two legs and can win bicycle races.



  • @boomzilla said:

    I'm currently reading The Mother Tongue,
     

    Right amusing book proper, what?



  • @boomzilla said:

    I'm currently reading The Mother Tongue, which discusses the history of the English language. Some of the more amusing bits talk about British snobbishness in reaction to things Americans say or write which the Brits believe have been created by Americans. Often, however, the words had been used in Britain before (even in Shakespeare's plays) but had fallen out of use in Britain. From Google Books:

    @page 173-174 said:
    To this day (1989) you can find authorities in Britain attacking such vile "Americanisms" as maximize, minimize, and input, quite unaware that the first two were coined by Jeremy Bentham more than a century ago and the last appeared more than 600 years ago in Wycliffe's translation of the Bible. Loan as a verb (rather than lend) is often criticized as an Americanism, when in fact it was first used in England a full eight centuries ago.

    I think they just miss being the most influential English speaking country. And they should leave silly language snobbishness to the French.

    Yeah, I know. I'm not British and didn't even learn English until the age of 13.

    From what I understand, there's a certain similarity between British and American English on the one hand, and Dutch and Afrikaans on the other. Now (modern) Dutch and Afrikaans are two similar but distinct languages, so the comparison is somewhat crippled, but certain elements in Afrikaans come from 17th century Dutch, which then evolved into a different direction from Afrikaans. Likewise, certain things you see or hear in American English come from Britain – but they stopped being used there. In fact, there are certain localities in England (I think) where you could easily mistake the accent for a North American one (East Coast obviously).

     



  • @dhromed said:

    Right amusing book proper, what?
     

    I say, old chap.. that's just not cricket!

    I fancy it rather a ripping read - a wheezer jape!



  • @Cassidy said:

    @dhromed said:
    Right amusing book proper, what?

    I say, old chap.. that's just not cricket!

    I fancy it rather a ripping read - a wheezer jape!


    Top-hole! Bally Jerry, pranged his kite right in the how's your father. Hairy blighter, dicky-birdied, feathered back on his Sammy, took a waspy, flipped over on his Betty Harper's and caught his can in the Bertie.



  • @Xyro said:

    @Cassidy said:
    @dhromed said:
    Right amusing book proper, what?

    I say, old chap.. that's just not cricket!

    I fancy it rather a ripping read - a wheezer jape!


    Top-hole! Bally Jerry, pranged his kite right in the how's your father. Hairy blighter, dicky-birdied, feathered back on his Sammy, took a waspy, flipped over on his Betty Harper's and caught his can in the Bertie.
    Cabbage crates coming over the briny!



  •  Geezers get excited.



  •  Had to Google that, which admittedly is a little embarrassing.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rKYL0tW-Ek


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