JQuery JQuery Get Get!



  •  I'm trying to teach my team jQuery. Sometimes I think-- how to put it diplomatically-- they just don't understand things.

     (For those unfamiliar with jQuery, the $("....") block says:"Find the DOM
    element with the css class 'lblRemoved'. Get it's DOM id. Then select
    the [b]EXACT SAME FUCKING ELEMENT[/b] by its ID using javascript.")

    var lblRemoved_Ages = document.getElementById($('.lblRemoved').attr('id'));

     if (lblRemoved_Ages.innerHTML == "Deselect All")
    {
      // massive block of code with the word 'true' appearing once
    }
    else
    {
      // [b]exact same massive block of code, except for the once instance of 'true' being turned into 'false'[/b]
    }

    And this isn't even counting the constant use of:

    $(<some list selector>).each(function() { $(this).attr("some_attribute", "constant_value");  });

    Instead of

    $(<some list selector>).attr("some_attribute", "constant_value");



  • jQuery is exciting and cool. Sites that use jQuery are exciting and cool. So sites that use [b]more[/b] jQuery must be even more exciting and cool!



    I don't know, people these days have no sense of style. Next you'll be telling me you don't need a memcached backed node.js server to serve error documents.



  •  Sites that use jQuery don't break when the "developers" don't know crap-shit about cross-browser javascript.

    document.all?  WHY NOT?

    eval("alert("eval is teh best!")")"     OF COURSE!

    window.onload = "myFunctionCopiedFormExpertsSexChange"  GOOD IDEA!

     



  •  I don't think jQuery's your problem- the "exact same massive block of code, except" bit just tells me that they can't program. At all.  You are wasting your time even trying to teach them jQuery, it's like trying to teach how to make a souffle to someone who can't hold a spoon.



  • @orange_robot said:

    it's like trying to teach how to make a souffle to someone who can't hold a spoon.

    One does not need a spoon to make a souffle.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    I'm trying to teach my team jQuery. Sometimes I think-- how to put it diplomatically-- they just don't understand things.

    There are no bad students, only bad teachers.



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @Lorne Kates said:

    I'm trying to teach my team jQuery. Sometimes I think-- how to put it diplomatically-- they just don't understand things.

    There are no bad students, only bad teachers.

     

    And then there are bad managers who tell the teachers "just do a 10 minute primer, everyone will pick it up on their own. Time is money. People will pick it up on their own, and if they have to just hack together something that works, then it works at that moment and that's all that matters."

     

     



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @orange_robot said:

    it's like trying to teach how to make a souffle to someone who can't hold a spoon.

    One does not need a spoon to make a souffle.

     

    Huh?

    [url="http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/cheese-souffle-recipe/index.html"]The first recipe I found[/url]


    • Butter, room temperature, for greasing the souffle
    • 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan
    • 1 1/2 ounces (3 tablespoons) butter
    • 3 tablespoons flour
    • 1 teaspoon dry mustard
    • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
    • 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
    • 1 1/3 cups milk, hot
    • 4 large egg yolks (2 1/2 ounces by weight)
    • 6 ounces sharp Cheddar
    • 5 egg whites plus 1 tablespoon water (5 1/2 ounces by weight plus 1/2 ounce water)
    • 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar

    The instructions include tempering the egg yolk mixture. I don't know how YOU add small amounts of hot liquid into cold egg yolk and then stir it together-- but I would use a spoon.

     

     



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @Lorne Kates said:

    I'm trying to teach my team jQuery. Sometimes I think-- how to put it diplomatically-- they just don't understand things.

    There are no bad students, only bad teachers.

    Of course there are bad students. They're the ones who aren't willing to learn, or who aren't willing to unlearn things they've already learned. They're the "please send me teh codez" people, the people with a CS degree who can't write FizzBuzz in an interview, the ones who inspired the term "cargo cult programming". The fact that they don't care enough to learn to do things the right way is not a sign of a bad teacher.



  • @Someone You Know said:

    @Speakerphone Dude said:
    @Lorne Kates said:

    I'm trying to teach my team jQuery. Sometimes I think-- how to put it diplomatically-- they just don't understand things.

    There are no bad students, only bad teachers.

    Of course there are bad students. They're the ones who aren't willing to learn, or who aren't willing to unlearn things they've already learned. They're the "please send me teh codez" people, the people with a CS degree who can't write FizzBuzz in an interview, the ones who inspired the term "cargo cult programming". The fact that they don't care enough to learn to do things the right way is not a sign of a bad teacher.

    TRWTF is that someone who is teaching jQuery to other people is making fun of their mistakes and blames them for being unwilling/unable to learn. It's like a dude trying to get a girl's phone number and when she turns him down because he is lame and ugly he tells everybody that she must be a lesbian.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @orange_robot said:

    it's like trying to teach how to make a souffle to someone who can't hold a spoon.

    One does not need a spoon to make a souffle.

     

    Huh?

    The first recipe I found

    [snip copy-pasted recipe with "spoon" in bold]

    You found a recipe that can be done with a spoon (still not requires it). That would be a very good point if you wanted to dispute a statement to the effect that souflle cannot be done with a spoon. I'll bookmark this, just in case this argument becomes relevant in a future discussion.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

     Sites that use jQuery don't break when the "developers" don't know crap-shit about cross-browser javascript.

    document.all?  WHY NOT?

    eval("alert("eval is teh best!")")"     OF COURSE!

    window.onload = "myFunctionCopiedFormExpertsSexChange"  GOOD IDEA!

     

    What year are you from? Will you reveal the secrets of your hibernation technology?



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @orange_robot said:

    it's like trying to teach how to make a souffle to someone who can't hold a spoon.

    One does not need a spoon to make a souffle.
    There is no spoon.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

     Sites that use jQuery don't break when the "developers" don't know crap-shit about cross-browser javascript.

    I love cross-browser javascript, it is so convenient when I want to copy my bookmarks from IE to Chrome.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    What year are you from? Will you reveal the secrets of your hibernation technology?
     

    Do I make a joke about the Start Menu, or Java?  (Or bears?)

    My point is, sometimes you want to do something with javascript. And sometimes, there's more than one way of doing it. And sometimes, only one of those ways will work in more than IE7. Chances are, the "developer" will do a quick Google search, get a link farm to a help blog to a help site that tells them to use out of date code that is browser specific. That code "may" work, but it will just sit there, festering, until one day a high-profile clients decides that yes, they would like to use Firefox or Chrome or Opera or Safari or their mobile phone or IE8.  Suddenly, that "developer's" document.all code shits a shitfit, and code breaks.

    Whereas for the exact same amount of time Googling for a solution to copy/paste, you can get (usually) get a 1 line piece of jQuery that will work now and close enoguh to forever to not matter.

    In other words: If you don't know how to do something, but must, please do it in a way that will result in the least amount of damage when it finally explodes.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    My point is, sometimes you want to do something with javascript. And sometimes, there's more than one way of doing it. And sometimes, only one of those ways will work in more than IE7.

    Yeah, this is the part where I'm asking what year you went into hibernation.

    @Lorne Kates said:

    Whereas for the exact same amount of time Googling for a solution to copy/paste, you can get (usually) get a 1 line piece of jQuery that will work now and close enoguh to forever to not matter.

    There are a lot of use-cases where jQuery isn't available.



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @Someone You Know said:
    @Speakerphone Dude said:
    @Lorne Kates said:

    I'm trying to teach my team jQuery. Sometimes I think-- how to put it diplomatically-- they just don't understand things.

    There are no bad students, only bad teachers.

    Of course there are bad students. They're the ones who aren't willing to learn, or who aren't willing to unlearn things they've already learned. They're the "please send me teh codez" people, the people with a CS degree who can't write FizzBuzz in an interview, the ones who inspired the term "cargo cult programming". The fact that they don't care enough to learn to do things the right way is not a sign of a bad teacher.

    TRWTF is that someone who is teaching jQuery to other people is making fun of their mistakes and blames them for being unwilling/unable to learn. It's like a dude trying to get a girl's phone number and when she turns him down because he is lame and ugly he tells everybody that she must be a lesbian.

    I would agree with you for people who are unable to learn, due to some mental disability, or whatever. But not for people who are unwilling to learn. If you don't care enough about jQuery to learn how to do it right, then don't try to learn jQuery.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Lorne Kates said:
    My point is, sometimes you want to do something with javascript. And sometimes, there's more than one way of doing it. And sometimes, only one of those ways will work in more than IE7.

    Yeah, this is the part where I'm asking what year you went into hibernation.

    Honestly not sure what you're trolling for there. Maybe your entire codebase is 100% brand-spanking new and has never been sullied by browser-specific code, and all your developers are fully aware of the fact that there are other browsers on the market.  If so, nice company.

    My point is that, as recently as this month, I've seen new javascript code checked in that is either out of date, or will be headache to maintain, or could have been done in 1/100th of the time in jquery.  Also, as recently as yesterday, I had code in production explode because the client upgraded some of their (corporate) systems to use IE8.

    And I just googled right now for "How to show/hide an element in javascript", and got a blog from 2009 which still advocates this. Emphasis and one comment mine.

     <a onclick ="javascript:ShowHide('HiddenDiv')" href="javascript:;" >Show/Hide</a>

    <div class="mid" id="HiddenDiv" style="DISPLAY: none" >
    This text was hidden
    </div>

    <script language="JavaScript">
    function ShowHide(divId)
    {

    // Should we store this element in a variable instead of hitting the DOM twice? Nah.  
    // Is Javascript case insensitive? I guess we'll find out when someone fat-fingers style="display:None"

    if(document.getElementById(divId).style.display == 'none')
    {
    document.getElementById(divId).style.display='block';
    }
    else
    {
    document.getElementById(divId).style.display = 'none';
    }
    }
    </script>

     So shitty devs leave shitty code, google for shitting blogs that propagate shitty code, and continue to shit shitty shittiness all over the place. Even in 2012. Even in 2012!

    Shit like this is the reason Javascript gets such a bad rep, and why even in 2012, I can hit a site with a wysiwyg editor or calendar control or just a fucking validator that DOESN'T WORK IN FIREFOX.  I haven't seen "This site is best viewed in Internet Explorer" for a while, but it sure is implied.

    Some car analogy-- knowing how to shift (badly) in a Ford, but not a Mazda, so forcing them to use automatic transmission. Fuck, don't care.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Lorne Kates said:
    Whereas for the exact same amount of time Googling for a solution to copy/paste, you can get (usually) get a 1 line piece of jQuery that will work now and close enoguh to forever to not matter.

    There are a lot of use-cases where jQuery isn't available.

     

    Serious non-troll question:  I haven't hit one of these use-cases yet, and would rather not be blindsided. What's a use-case of jQuery not being available? (I'll not pedantic dickweed the use of the term "a lot" if there are only a few)



  • @Lorne Kates said:

     I'm trying to teach my team jQuery. Sometimes I think-- how to put it diplomatically-- they just don't understand things.

    And there you go. All the incompetent flash devs have now jumped ship to make crap code in other languages. All the haters really would have been better off supporting flash and making us keep them....



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    Honestly not sure what you're trolling for there. Maybe your entire codebase is 100% brand-spanking new and has never been sullied by browser-specific code, and all your developers are fully aware of the fact that there are other browsers on the market. If so, nice company.

    Wow I thought I had a bad opinion of my fellow coders.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    Serious non-troll question: I haven't hit one of these use-cases yet, and would rather not be blindsided. What's a use-case of jQuery not being available? (I'll not pedantic dickweed the use of the term "a lot" if there are only a few)

    Bookmarklets/whatever they're called (Pinterest has a pretty popular one, you might have heard of them)*. Analytics .js files that have to be compatible with existing sites (and thus can't rely on a particular JS library be available). And of course, if you're writing in a non-web JavaScript environment, you can't rely on jQuery or any particular web-based JS library being available-- the obvious case for that is ActionScript. Ad placements, although those typically run in an iframe so it's kind of moot in most cases. A/B or multivariate software based on JS, especially if it is used to serve-up JS to the site being tested. Opinion surveys, virtually always in JS, virtually always hosted on the site's namespace.

    That's off the top of my head, there's probably other stuff. I'm sure you'll declare, "that's not a lot", but it's enough that I see one of those scenarios almost every day.

    *) Actually bookmarklets are particularly troublesome because there's no way in standard JS/DOM to tell whether the LOAD event has already fired or not. IE has its brilliant "document.readyState" variable which takes care of this use-case, but because it's insanely clever and useful, naturally it was never adopted by the W3C. The tendency is to write your bookmarklet assuming the LOAD event has already fired, and that the DOM is safe to fiddle around with, but that's not "correct"-- like so many things in web dev, there's no way of doing the "correct" behavior here.

    EDIT: Added more stuff to the lists



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    Serious non-troll question:  I haven't hit one of these use-cases yet, and would rather not be blindsided. What's a use-case of jQuery not being available? (I'll not pedantic dickweed the use of the term "a lot" if there are only a few)

    Blakey could cite more from his web analytic side, but I can give a quick example from my own experience.

    Let's say your company's laughably out of date intranet, previously maintained by the secretary and a copy of FrontPage, needs be serious'd up. So the web team swoops in and replaces the whole shebang with a radically new technology known as "portlets". You're then given instructions on how to write up content for your team's portlets and whatnot in order to plug them into the whole design. Unfortunately, as it turns out, the web team isn't actually that good, and the portlet structure is cobbled together with two-and-a-half different Javascript frameworks, all hopelessly outdated, none of which are jQuery. You are asked by your boss to make the best whizzo team page evar. Also, since it's all new, the web team is watching out to make sure you don't step on their grass, and they also enforce portlet branding. You know, to keep everything looking like one solid company, not the dozens of little fiefdoms that it is.

    Before my rambleometer cuts me off, my point is simply this: if you have to embed little bits of your own content into established pages, hauling in your own Javascript framework with unknown interactions to the rest of the page is generally a problematic solution. I think that would be a case where jQuery, at least if it isn't already provided, wouldn't be ideal.



  • @Xyro said:

    Before my rambleometer cuts me off, my point is simply this: if you have to embed little bits of your own content into established pages, hauling in your own Javascript framework with unknown interactions to the rest of the page is generally a problematic solution.

    Yup.

    One of my longstanding complaints about the W3C is that they never talk to actual web developers working on actual web sites being used for actual non-academic useful purposes. If they interviewed Xyro, me, or pretty much anybody else in our field about what we do on a day-to-day basis, they'd be like, "holy shit JavaScript needs namespaces POST-HASTE!"

    Instead of proper namespaces, we're all cramming our script into a single convoluted function/object/thing to minimize our namespace footprint, and meanwhile Prototype.js and jQuery.js are boxing each other to define the $ variable first, and it's a gigantic shit-fest.



  •  

    ... Use Cases

     

    That's not a lot Those are some useful Use Cases. Yes, those indeed are cases where jQuery (or any other js library) would be useless. I'm not sure if I should be happy or sad no one else in the company would even know what they were (or when/how to use them).

    If we had to do bookmarklets, I'd probably say "Here's some jQuery. Go play in the corner and let the real programmers do their work in Javascript". Then I'd google for the answer and copy paste it. =)



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Lorne Kates said:
    Honestly not sure what you're trolling for there. Maybe your entire codebase is 100% brand-spanking new and has never been sullied by browser-specific code, and all your developers are fully aware of the fact that there are other browsers on the market. If so, nice company.

    Wow I thought I had a bad opinion of my fellow coders.

     

    It's 2012, and I'm still running across code-behind files with Response.Write( << html elements here >>);

    And Frames. Not iFrames. Frames. Multiple frames with javascript to change their width and height-- in a way that was not cross-browser compatible, and had to be re-written.

    Frames.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    @Lorne Kates said:
    Honestly not sure what you're trolling for there. Maybe your entire codebase is 100% brand-spanking new and has never been sullied by browser-specific code, and all your developers are fully aware of the fact that there are other browsers on the market. If so, nice company.

    Wow I thought I had a bad opinion of my fellow coders.

     

    It's 2012, and I'm still running across code-behind files with Response.Write( << html elements here >>);

    And Frames. Not iFrames. Frames. Multiple frames with javascript to change their width and height-- in a way that was not cross-browser compatible, and had to be re-written.

    Frames.

    At least you don't have layers in your webapps, like one of my clients... they still use Netscape internally. Whenever I go there it's a walk down memory lane, with the big buttons in the toolbar and the ugly mouse pointer.

    The sad thing is that those webapps are done in the "New Initiatives" group; the bleeding-edge people who dare venture away from the HP-3000 "proven" enterprise applications. (For some reason management did not get the clue that their IT stack is obsolete when their primary hardware vendor became eBay instead of HP, but that's another story).

    Word of wisdom: anyone who hates Oracle needs to play a bit with TurboImage to put things in perspective.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Speakerphone Dude said:


    Word of wisdom: anyone who hates Oracle needs to play a bit with TurboImage to put things in perspective.

    I spent years forgetting about TurboImage. Now everything has come back as though it were just yesterday. I hope you're happy.


  •  But frames securely mediate by design.  How can you be against them?



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    You found a recipe that can be done with a spoon (still not requires it). That would be a very good point if you wanted to dispute a statement to the effect that souflle cannot be done with a spoon. I'll bookmark this, just in case this argument becomes relevant in a future discussion.
     

    You are an unfunny moron. Stop posting.

     



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    There are no bad students, only bad teachers.
     

    And then there are students who persist in blaming the teacher for their own ineptness.

    Sadly, some are correct. But I find those a minority.



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @orange_robot said:

    it's like trying to teach how to make a souffle to someone who can't hold a spoon.

    One does not need a spoon to make a souffle.

    Your pedantic response misses the point. How many people that can't hold a spoon can make a souffle? Of the people who have the necessary prerequisite knowledge and aptitude to make a souffle, how many can't hold spoons? I think not being able to hold a spoon is a pretty good indicator that you're going to fail at making a souffle regardless of the talent of the teacher.



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @Lorne Kates said:

    I'm trying to teach my team jQuery. Sometimes I think-- how to put it diplomatically-- they just don't understand things.

    There are no bad students, only bad teachers.

    Counterexample



  • @Jaime said:

    @Speakerphone Dude said:
    @orange_robot said:

    it's like trying to teach how to make a souffle to someone who can't hold a spoon.

    One does not need a spoon to make a souffle.

    Your pedantic response misses the point. How many people that can't hold a spoon can make a souffle? Of the people who have the necessary prerequisite knowledge and aptitude to make a souffle, how many can't hold spoons? I think not being able to hold a spoon is a pretty good indicator that you're going to fail at making a souffle regardless of the talent of the teacher.
     

    Waitress:  "You want me to hold the spoon?"

    Jack:  "I want you to hold it between your knees."

     



  • @Zylon said:

    @Speakerphone Dude said:

    You found a recipe that can be done with a spoon (still not requires it). That would be a very good point if you wanted to dispute a statement to the effect that souflle cannot be done with a spoon. I'll bookmark this, just in case this argument becomes relevant in a future discussion.
     

    You are an unfunny moron. Stop posting.

     

    I think you mistakenly posted a note to yourself



  • @Jaime said:

    @Speakerphone Dude said:
    @Lorne Kates said:

    I'm trying to teach my team jQuery. Sometimes I think-- how to put it diplomatically-- they just don't understand things.

    There are no bad students, only bad teachers.

    Counterexample

    Now if we have to outsource bad studentship to India I think there is something really wrong with the civilized world.



  • @Jaime said:

    @Speakerphone Dude said:
    @orange_robot said:

    it's like trying to teach how to make a souffle to someone who can't hold a spoon.

    One does not need a spoon to make a souffle.

    Your pedantic response misses the point. How many people that can't hold a spoon can make a souffle? Of the people who have the necessary prerequisite knowledge and aptitude to make a souffle, how many can't hold spoons? I think not being able to hold a spoon is a pretty good indicator that you're going to fail at making a souffle regardless of the talent of the teacher.

    I will give you that there is a correlation, but then, you could say that someone who cannot hold a spoon is probably unable to learn jQuery so this is not a strong argument.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    The instructions include tempering the egg yolk mixture. I don't know how YOU add small amounts of hot liquid into cold egg yolk and then stir it together-- but I would use a spoon.


    I would probably use a teaspoon to transfer the liquid and a fork to mix it in, but wouldn't serious chefs pour a thin stream into the path of an electric whisk?



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    I'm trying to teach my team jQuery.
     

    Why are you doing this when you need to teach them programming first? Horse before cart!

    Even my JS noob coworker (I introduced him to the wonderful world of setTimeout and setInterval today) would see that the code you describe is complete shit.

    You coworkers are, currently, idiots. this may or may not be a permanent state. We all started out as idiots, and then we gained experience and competence. If you want to fix it, you need to teach them programming first. Then can they learn jQuery.



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @orange_robot said:

    it's like trying to teach how to make a souffle to someone who can't hold a spoon.

    One does not need a spoon to make a souffle.

     

    Lose 50 tokens. Shuffle into top half of deck.

     



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @Lorne Kates said:

    I'm trying to teach my team jQuery. Sometimes I think-- how to put it diplomatically-- they just don't understand things.

    There are no bad students, only bad teachers.

     

    Lose 50 tokens. Shuffle into top half of deck.

     



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    You found a recipe that can be done with a spoon (still not requires it). That would be a very good point if you wanted to dispute a statement to the effect that souflle cannot be done with a spoon. I'll bookmark this, just in case this argument becomes relevant in a future discussion.
     

    Lose 50 tokens. Shuffle into top half of deck.



  • @pjt33 said:

    @Lorne Kates said:

    The instructions include tempering the egg yolk mixture. I don't know how YOU add small amounts of hot liquid into cold egg yolk and then stir it together-- but I would use a spoon.


    I would probably use a teaspoon to transfer the liquid and a fork to mix it in, but wouldn't serious chefs pour a thin stream into the path of an electric whisk?
     

    Not when tempering. This is when you have a hot, melted fat mixture, and a cold, beaten egg-yolk mixture. You want to combined them into a  Pour too much of one into the other, and you either solidify your fat, or cook the eggs.

    You spoon a very little bit of the fat mixture into the egg (or sometimes, vice-versa), to slowly bring the egg temperature up-- warm, but not cooking hot. You need to stir it all together, so it starts to combine (and you don't just have hot sitting on top of egg).

    Eventually, you have the starting of you batter. The eggs are warm enough to not be shocked, there's enough of an emulsion so it won't all just separate. THEN you can fully combine the two and yes, at that point, you'll probably whisk it all together to complete an emulsion.

    Or you can microwave a box of pasta, I suppose. 

     



  •  Frozen pizza.



  • @dhromed said:

     Frozen pizza.

     

    I bet you're one of those foodie assholes who insists on thawing and cooking the pizza. Why? If you can eat a popsicle frozen, you can eat a fucking pizza frozen. Just crack it over your knee and maw down. Don't need any forks. Microwave? Oven? Fuck that. You know what'll thaw that? EIGHT HOURS IN MY GUT!  And if it moves too quickly, then the frozen shards will numb my colon so I won't feel them stabbing their way to freedom.  

     

     



  • @dhromed said:

    Lose 50 tokens. Shuffle into top half of deck.

    I suspect that this is some kind of reference to a nerd/teenage card game (Pokemon maybe?), but when i was in high school I was not in the A/V or chess clubs so I was never properly introduced to this fascinating world. But I want to thank you because I was not aware that some people keep playing or talking a lot about Pokemon when they grow up. Now I'll look differently at the GeekSquad dudes.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    @dhromed said:

     Frozen pizza.

     

    I bet you're one of those foodie assholes who insists on thawing and cooking the pizza. Why? If you can eat a popsicle frozen, you can eat a fucking pizza frozen. Just crack it over your knee and maw down. Don't need any forks. Microwave? Oven? Fuck that. You know what'll thaw that? EIGHT HOURS IN MY GUT!  And if it moves too quickly, then the frozen shards will numb my colon so I won't feel them stabbing their way to freedom.  

     

     

    The proper way to eat frozen pizza has been demonstrated in the movie Cobra.



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @dhromed said:

    Lose 50 tokens. Shuffle into top half of deck.

    I suspect that this is some kind of reference to a nerd/teenage card game (Pokemon maybe?), but when i was in high school I was not in the A/V or chess clubs so I was never properly introduced to this fascinating world. But I want to thank you because I was not aware that some people keep playing or talking a lot about Pokemon when they grow up. Now I'll look differently at the GeekSquad dudes.
    He was referencing this: http://forums.thedailywtf.com/forums/p/26264/295048.aspx#295048



  • @Anketam said:

    @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @dhromed said:

    Lose 50 tokens. Shuffle into top half of deck.

    I suspect that this is some kind of reference to a nerd/teenage card game (Pokemon maybe?), but when i was in high school I was not in the A/V or chess clubs so I was never properly introduced to this fascinating world. But I want to thank you because I was not aware that some people keep playing or talking a lot about Pokemon when they grow up. Now I'll look differently at the GeekSquad dudes.
    He was referencing this: http://forums.thedailywtf.com/forums/p/26264/295048.aspx#295048

    And that in turn was a reference to Pokemon I guess? Gotta catch'em all! (see, I belong in this group)



  • @Speakerphone Dude said:

    @Anketam said:
    @Speakerphone Dude said:
    @dhromed said:
    Lose 50 tokens. Shuffle into top half of deck.

    I suspect that this is some kind of reference to a nerd/teenage card game (Pokemon maybe?), but when i was in high school I was not in the A/V or chess clubs so I was never properly introduced to this fascinating world. But I want to thank you because I was not aware that some people keep playing or talking a lot about Pokemon when they grow up. Now I'll look differently at the GeekSquad dudes.
    He was referencing this: http://forums.thedailywtf.com/forums/p/26264/295048.aspx#295048
    And that in turn was a reference to Pokemon I guess? Gotta catch'em all! (see, I belong in this group)
    Sounds more like he was referencing Magic the Gathering.


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