Help me figure out which program I run is keeping my monitor from sleeping!



  • Windows has a handy (undecided whether that is sarcasm or not) feature which lets applications prevent the monitor from going to sleep. It's intended to be used by, say, a media application playing a full-screen video. All this is fine and dandy.

    Unfortunately, one of the programs on my system is setting the "no monitor sleep" flag and never un-setting it, with the result that my monitors never go to sleep. Ever.

    How in blazes are you supposed to diagnose a problem like that? Is there a program I can install that'll beep when some program sets the "no monitor sleep" flag and tell me which program?

    I have some suspicions it's one of the following:
    Zune
    Flash in Chrome when playing a video full-screen
    Steam

    But it really could be any of a dozen other programs I have installed too. Sony Vegas? Any one of my dozens of games?

    Stumped here!



  • It happens when none of those programs is actually running?



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Windows has a handy (undecided whether that is sarcasm or not) feature which lets applications prevent the monitor from going to sleep. It's intended to be used by, say, a media application playing a full-screen video. All this is fine and dandy.

    Unfortunately, one of the programs on my system is setting the "no monitor sleep" flag and never un-setting it, with the result that my monitors never go to sleep. Ever.

    How in blazes are you supposed to diagnose a problem like that? Is there a program I can install that'll beep when some program sets the "no monitor sleep" flag and tell me which program?

    I have some suspicions it's one of the following:
    Zune
    Flash in Chrome when playing a video full-screen
    Steam

    But it really could be any of a dozen other programs I have installed too. Sony Vegas? Any one of my dozens of games?

    Stumped here!

    try powercfg? http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324347 IIRC you want powercfg -energy -xml -output c:\temp.xml
    Alternatively you could install the windows SDK Performance Tooklit, but I have no idea if that would help. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/performance/cc825801.aspx


  • Yeah, either:

    1) One of those programs toggles it on but never turns it off, or

    2) One of those programs has a service or non-UI element that toggles it on and keeps it on even after the main window has closed





  •  On lifehacker, even.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Finally found the goddamned fucking command for this shit.

    That's pretty cool. So which program was TRWTF here?



  • @boomzilla said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    Finally found the goddamned fucking command for this shit.

    That's pretty cool. So which program was TRWTF here?

    I won't know until my monitor starts sticking on again, but now I know how to check



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Finally found the goddamned fucking command for this shit.
    Wow, powercfg, I'm glad nobody recommended that tool for you.



  •  Vista doesn't have powercfg -requests, apparently.

    Also, it's weird that Windows 7 is in fact 6.1, as evidenced by the command prompt in lifehacker's screenshot.



  • @dhromed said:

     Vista doesn't have powercfg -requests, apparently.

    The powercfg -output c:\temp.html would have given the same info, just with a lot of other stuff about the power state. In 6.0+ Windows kernels you can use it for energy auditing.

    @dhromed said:

    Also, it's weird that Windows 7 is in fact 6.1, as evidenced by the command prompt in lifehacker's screenshot.

    Windows 8 is kernel version 6.2.



  • @dhromed said:

    Vista doesn't have powercfg -requests, apparently.

    Also, it's weird that Windows 7 is in fact 6.1, as evidenced by the command prompt in lifehacker's screenshot.

    "Windows 7" is the operating system version. 6.1 is the NT kernel version. They've always been counted separately, this is not new.



  •  I probably just got confused when once upon a time I saw Vista with a formal version 6 point something.


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