ATI SmartSave



  • The other day, Firefox did something naughty and crashed my video card (ATI Radeon HD 2400 XT¹, low profile dual-DVI).

    The ATI driver kindly reset the card for me – Firefox didn't even notice the card crashing. ATI SmartSave then generated a crash dump for me and put it into an e-mail ready to be sent to ATI, so that they can gloat over Firefox's misdeeds.

    Two small problems. Firstly, they set the MAPI message type to a copy of the e-mail address instead of SMTP, so Outlook sent me one of those nice “System Administrator”² “None of your e-mail accounts could send to this recipient” bounces:

    The other small problem is that, naturally, the address doesn't exist.


    ¹ Windows says "ATI Radeon HD 2400 Pro", but pcidatabase.com confirms that device 94C1 is the ATI Radeon HD 2400 XT that came in the box from Dell.

    ² Why does Outlook pretend that you have some nonexistent system administrator?



  • @Daniel Beardsmore said:

    The other day, Firefox did something naughty and crashed my video card

    Given my experiences with working rendering pipelines and ATi's drivers I'd say Firefox probably didn't do anything wrong



  • @nexekho said:

    @Daniel Beardsmore said:
    The other day, Firefox did something naughty and crashed my video card

    Given my experiences with working rendering pipelines and ATi's drivers I'd say Firefox probably didn't do anything wrong

    Shut up, it's all Firefox's fault. It is the root source of evil in this universe!



  • @nexekho said:

    Given my experiences with working rendering pipelines and ATi's drivers I'd say Firefox probably didn't do anything wrong

    Is it that bad?

    I only ask because years back I used nVidia and had no problems with Unreal Tournament, but a few players had rendering issues. In desperation, one ripped out his ATi card and replaced it with a 7600GT and everything worked sweet as a nut. Others complained about some ATi issues also.

    The flipside is that nVidia used to have poor Linux support so people recommended going for ATi cards if you wanted a nooks desktop. Is that still the case, or not?



  • @Cassidy said:

    Is it that bad?

    It's worse for OpenGL applications than DirectX, much, much worse.
    @Cassidy said:
    The flipside is that nVidia used to have poor Linux support so people recommended going for ATi cards if you wanted a nooks desktop. Is that still the case, or not?

    I've not used Linux much in recent years but on an ATi laptop I had problems with the framebuffer being misaligned. (entire screen off by a few rows with those missing rows filled with noise)



  • @Cassidy said:

    The flipside is that nVidia used to have poor Linux support so people recommended going for ATi cards if you wanted a nooks desktop. Is that still the case, or not?
    For as long as I can remember, nVidia's Linux support was far superior than ATI's - as long as you used their proprietary driver. ATI has had open-source drivers available longer, and with broader hardware support than the open-source nVidia drivers, but those drivers lacked features compared to the propriertary driver (which was harder to set up than nvidia's)



  • @ender said:

    @Cassidy said:
    The flipside is that nVidia used to have poor Linux support so people recommended going for ATi cards if you wanted a nooks desktop. Is that still the case, or not?
    For as long as I can remember, nVidia's Linux support was far superior than ATI's - as long as you used their proprietary driver. ATI has had open-source drivers available longer, and with broader hardware support than the open-source nVidia drivers, but those drivers lacked features compared to the propriertary driver (which was harder to set up than nvidia's)

    Aye, the proprietary driver from nVidia was heads and tails above the rest last time I looked. Part of the reason why WebGL in Firefox under Linux was only supported if you used this nVidia driver - the Firefox team openly stated that ATi's offering was crap and they were thusly forced to disable support for ATi cards under Linux.



  • @Rhywden said:

    the Firefox team openly stated that ATi's offering was crap and they were thusly forced to disable support for ATi cards under Linux.

    Ooo, ouch - bet that stings.. I thought ATi sponsored development of the O/source driver. Ouch.

    Useful info, ta people. I've always been an nViddy fanboi since I've had far less hassle from their H/W.



  • @nexekho said:

    @Cassidy said:
    Is it that bad?

    It's worse for OpenGL applications than DirectX, much, much worse.
    I mentioned this a while back...when Rage came out it had problems with ATI cards so ATI published a temporary patch for it while they worked on the next release of their drivers. Said patch somehow managed to disable OpenGL completely by making it impossible to to initiate an OpenGL window. 

    They corrected the problem with the next driver release although Rage still wouldn't run work properly. I didn't get to play it until one or two more driver updates. Good times.



  • @nexekho said:

    @Daniel Beardsmore said:
    The other day, Firefox did something naughty and crashed my video card

    Given my experiences with working rendering pipelines and ATi's drivers I'd say Firefox probably didn't do anything wrong
     

    It's a display driver. No matter what fucked up shit Firefox does, it shouldn't be able to do more than crash itself, not sth operating in kernel. The driver crashing is a bug on ATI's side.

    With such shitty drivers, people should probably think twice before adopting WebGL.



  • @topspin said:

    With such shitty drivers, people should probably think twice before adopting WebGL.

    Agreed. There's a thousand ways to screw up via 3D APIs when you're not trying to, and you people want these APIs [i]exposed to the fucking internet[/i]!?



  • @topspin said:

    @nexekho said:

    @Daniel Beardsmore said:
    The other day, Firefox did something naughty and crashed my video card

    Given my experiences with working rendering pipelines and ATi's drivers I'd say Firefox probably didn't do anything wrong
     

    It's a display driver. No matter what fucked up shit Firefox does, it shouldn't be able to do more than crash itself, not sth operating in kernel. The driver crashing is a bug on ATI's side.

    With such shitty drivers, people should probably think twice before adopting WebGL.

    Do graphics drivers still run in kernel mode? I thought that the only reason Windows can reset it is because it's running in user mode. If it was running in kernel mode, wouldn't a crash result in the dread Azure Screen of Unliving?



  • @pkmnfrk said:

    Do graphics drivers still run in kernel mode? I thought that the only reason Windows can reset it is because it's running in user mode. If it was running in kernel mode, wouldn't a crash result in the dread Azure Screen of Unliving?
     

    I'm not sure, you're probably right.

    It's still and endless source of bugs you wouldn't want exposed to the web, though.



  • @pkmnfrk said:

    @topspin said:

    It's a display driver. No matter what fucked up shit Firefox does, it shouldn't be able to do more than crash itself, not sth operating in kernel. The driver crashing is a bug on ATI's side.


    Do graphics drivers still run in kernel mode? I thought that the only reason Windows can reset it is because it's running in user mode. If it was running in kernel mode, wouldn't a crash result in the dread Azure Screen of Unliving?

    The video driver stopped responding, then both screens went off and I heard a fan spin up. My first reaction was, how has my PC managed to reboot without actually showing a BSOD? That's when the picture came back and I got a nice message that the video driver had hung. The website was something to do with a 3D printer, some sort of model viewer or editor I think (not much of it managed to load), but I didn't fancy having another peek at it.

    Kernel mode drivers can be loaded and unloaded dynamically; not sure what magic ATI are pulling that lets them stop a driver that isn't responding, as Windows is absolutely awful about being impotent to deal with anything that's stuck, for example programs that think they're being debugged, and cannot be killed, and userland programs that survive a logout as nothing on the face of the earth will kill them.

    I was genuinely impressed at how well the driver got itself out of that bind; I'm just amused that they fell, twice, at the simplest hurdle: sending an e-mail via MAPI. (And yes, while I am in XP, the drivers are only a few months old.)



  •  oooh I think my next upgrade might be nVidia. My first!



  • @dhromed said:

     oooh I think my next upgrade might be nVidia. My first!

    Many years ago, when I still played vidja games, I bought a Radeon because it got mostly-favorable reviews. After happily installing it I started Quake III. The normal frame rate was far better than my previous card but it dropped to a crawl when lots of rockets, explosions and gibs were on the screen. Also, the cooling was ridiculously insufficient and it rapidly overheated and shut down the whole computer. I was very disappointed. Luckily I was able to return it to Wal-Mart and buy a Geforce 3 online. It was more expensive but it was such a fantastic card that I used it for years. Ran reasonably cool, great frame rates, didn't bog down..

    Long story short: ATI was the balding, mustachioed, pedophile neighbor who lied to me in order to steal my innocence. nVidia was the white knight, riding to my rescue, beating that sick pervert to death and then instructing me in the ways of physical love. Which still would have been statutory rape, come to think of it..

    Nowadays I don't do video games so my last 4 or 5 laptops have all had integrated Intel graphics because I've had--by far--the best experience with the Intel Linux drivers. I'm currently awaiting Dell's release of Ivy Bridge Latitudes.



  •  Firefox froze up on me the other day when I unplugged my USB headphones while a youtube video was playing.

    IE did not when I tried it.



  • @ender said:

    For as long as I can remember, nVidia's Linux support was far superior than ATI's - as long as you used their proprietary driver. ATI has had open-source drivers available longer, and with broader hardware support than the open-source nVidia drivers, but those drivers lacked features compared to the propriertary driver (which was harder to set up than nvidia's)

    The situation with ATI's proprietary versus open-source driver has since turned around though. ATI drivers are generally known for poor support of newer OpenGL features on both Windows and Linux. The new Gallium rendering core now supports most OpenGL just fine, while ATI's fglrx driver is really far behind. The Gallium driver is still slower though.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @dhromed said:

     oooh I think my next upgrade might be nVidia. My first!

    Many years ago, when I still played vidja games, I bought a Radeon because it got mostly-favorable reviews. After happily installing it I started Quake III. The normal frame rate was far better than my previous card but it dropped to a crawl when lots of rockets, explosions and gibs were on the screen. Also, the cooling was ridiculously insufficient and it rapidly overheated and shut down the whole computer. I was very disappointed. Luckily I was able to return it to Wal-Mart and buy a Geforce 3 online. It was more expensive but it was such a fantastic card that I used it for years. Ran reasonably cool, great frame rates, didn't bog down...

    Long story short: ATI was the balding, mustachioed, pedophile neighbor who lied to me in order to steal my innocence. nVidia was the white knight, riding to my rescue, beating that sick pervert to death and then instructing me in the ways of physical love. Which still would have been statutory rape, come to think of it...

    Nowadays I don't do video games so my last 4 or 5 laptops have all had integrated Intel graphics because I've had--by far--the best experience with the Intel Linux drivers. I'm currently awaiting Dell's release of Ivy Bridge Latitudes.

    Y U NO PLAY VIDEOGAMES?

    As for ATI drivers, yeah, they are some of the worst. Only recently did they get application-specific profiles, which nVIDIA has had for literally half a decade already, and I've always found that ATI optimises the shit out of their drivers so new games run great but older games, not so much. My next card is definitely going to be NV.



  • My current laptop comes with a neat thing called Nvidia Optimus, which basically means it has an Intel integrated graphics card and an Nvidia graphics card. It works great in Windows (and by that I mean I've never actually noticed it, but there's a "Run with graphics processor" submenu when you right-click a .exe file and the games seem to run fine). On Linux... well there's a tool called "Bumblebee" which you can use to disable the Nvidia card (to consume less power) or explicitly run a program on it, or you can just ignore it and run on the Intel card. Luckily I'm not crazy enough to want to game on Linux (I almost got TF2 to run on Wine though).

    @nexekho said:

    @topspin said:
    With such shitty drivers, people should probably think twice before adopting WebGL.

    Agreed. There's a thousand ways to screw up via 3D APIs when you're not trying to, and you people want these APIs exposed to the fucking internet!?

    I'm not saying we should blindly do that, but at least it would be a way to force the graphics card developers to actually write good drivers.



  • @bgodot said:

     Flash (running in Firefox) froze up on me the other day when I unplugged my USB headphones while a youtube video was playing.

    Flash (running in IE) did not when I tried it.

    FTFY



  • @Strolskon said:

    @nexekho said:
    Agreed. There's a thousand ways to screw up via 3D APIs when you're not trying to, and you people want these APIs exposed to the fucking internet!?

    I'm not saying we should blindly do that, but at least it would be a way to force the graphics card developers to actually write good drivers.

    I was thinking more about the skript-kiddiot DoS potential, rather than forcing developers to improve their softwares (although one will lead to the other when a manufacturer begins to lose customers after specific makes/models begin to gain a reputation for frailty).

    @pkmnfrk said:

    @bgodot said:

     Flash (running in Firefox) froze up on me the other day when I unplugged my USB headphones while a youtube video was playing.

    Flash (running in IE) did not when I tried it.

    FTFY

     

    That implies it's more of a FF issue than a Flash issue, and less of a driver issue.

    I mean I know Flash can be wanky at the best of times, but a driver issue or flash issue would surely affect both browsers, no?

     



  • @Cassidy said:

    That implies it's more of a FF issue than a Flash issue, and less of a driver issue.

    I mean I know Flash can be wanky at the best of times, but a driver issue or flash issue would surely affect both browsers, no?

    Maybe. Obviously one is NPAPI and runs inside a container program, the other is ActiveX and runs inside IE. In fact, you may find that you don't have the same version for each browser, as Adobe's wretched update software tended to only update one of the versions, whichever one it felt like – it would never chain the updaters and do both, or any other logical approach to dealing with people who use multiple browsers. Maybe that's fixed now – I rarely see the updater, and since I have Firefox open on login (which blocks the updater), I rarely update either :(

    I did have a Flash update cause a period of barfing all over the display though.



  • @Strolskon said:

    (I almost got TF2 to run on Wine though)

    I actually did get it to run. IIRC, the menus weren't visible. Also it just crashed 3 seconds after you spawned. However, I could connect to a server and I could watch what other people were doing for quite some time before it crashed. The worst part was that I had bought the game on Steam. Steam under Wine was a bug enough PITA in itself, but through all my testing of different Wine configurations I ended up having to download the entire game over a dozen times.



  • @Daniel Beardsmore said:

    In fact, you may find that you don't have the same version for each browser

    I don't... but then I don't use IE. Nonetheless, I wasn't aware of that fact.

    @Daniel Beardsmore said:

    ..as Adobe's wretched update software tended to only update one of the versions, whichever one it felt like

    I think their processes are a WTF in itself: you download a downloader that downloads the update. Why not just... give me the update in the first place?



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    ... but through all my testing of different Wine configurations I ended up having to download the entire game over a dozen times.

    You tried this recently? Or tried Cedega?

    <hasty placation>this isn't a "it's perfect now" rant</interjection>

    I only ask since I understand Windows game compatibility under WINE has improved vastly, and just curious to know what time period your experiences are from.

    nb: I've not actually tried it myself, I run many games natively under Linux.



  • Yeah. ATI's drivers are crap. I managed to write a Java applet that could BSOD a Windows box via the browser using Swing if you were using the stable release of ATI's drivers (any browser). It took me forever to troubleshoot that one. Just a heads-up, I ended up using the third party Omega drivers. The crash went away after updating to them. Mad props to the guy that made Omega. Sadly it seems he stopped updating them about a year ago.

    Also, I only run NVidia cards on my Linux boxes. And only with the proprietary driver. I care about openness and all that, but I want my drivers to work.



  • @Cassidy said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    ... but through all my testing of different Wine configurations I ended up having to download the entire game over a dozen times.

    You tried this recently? Or tried Cedega?

    <hasty placation>this isn't a "it's perfect now" rant</interjection>

    I only ask since I understand Windows game compatibility under WINE has improved vastly, and just curious to know what time period your experiences are from.

    nb: I've not actually tried it myself, I run many games natively under Linux.

    This was a few years ago. I don't play games any more, so I haven't bothered trying.

    I do run some business apps under Wine and I can tell you it's a disaster. Every time any event happens in the window, the whole thing sits there and flickers (I guess it's redrawing) a half dozen times, which pauses everything for 3 seconds. So: click button -> wait for window to stop flickering -> click another button -> wait for screen to stop flickering -> type text with each character causing the window to flicker..

    I'm willing to believe this is because the original program is a piece of shit, although it doesn't behave that way in Windows, so clearly something is also wrong in Wine.



  • Hmm.. okay. What about running them under Windows in a virtualised environment?

    I can't shake the feeling that WINE is still flaky, no matter what fanbois say.



  • @Cassidy said:

    I can't shake the feeling that WINE is still flaky.
     

    Because it's true.

    At the same time, it's a goddamn wrapper for an entire OS. Exactly how perfect can we expect it to be?



  • Whining about WINE

    @Cassidy said:

    Hmm.. okay. What about running them under Windows in a virtualised environment?

    I can't shake the feeling that WINE is still flaky, no matter what fanbois say.


    I'm a bit of a fanboy and I assure you, it's very, very flaky. Stuff that works from one version will break on another and getting anything non-trivial working can be a nightmare. According to their site Office-2000 should work under the version of WINE that I'm running, but it can't even get through the installer without crashing. Which is unfortunate because that's all I need to not have to dual boot at work.



  • @Gazzonyx said:

    Office-2000.

    That might be your problem.



  • @Gazzonyx said:

    @Cassidy said:

    Hmm.. okay. What about running them under Windows in a virtualised environment?

    I can't shake the feeling that WINE is still flaky, no matter what fanbois say.


    I'm a bit of a fanboy and I assure you, it's very, very flaky. Stuff that works from one version will break on another and getting anything non-trivial working can be a nightmare. According to their site Office-2000 should work under the version of WINE that I'm running, but it can't even get through the installer without crashing. Which is unfortunate because that's all I need to not have to dual boot at work.

    Have you tried Crossover Office?

    Personally, I just prefer to run a Win7 VM.



  • @Daniel Beardsmore said:

    @Gazzonyx said:
    Office-2000.

    That might be your problem.

    For whatever reason, our accounting package is based on Access-2000. It's 250K SLOC. I've been trying to migrate to another technology, but there are many political reasons that I cannot.

    We're under the gun since the word on the street is that Access-2000 doesn't run under Windows-7/Windows-8. I've sent a test off a couple of week ago and have yet to hear back (in the mean time I'm trolling these forums). I've migrated the backend to MySQL and started writing a front end in Java, but for political reasons these will never actually see the light of day. They will rot in their subversion repository for the rest of eternity.


  • @Gazzonyx said:

    We're under the gun since the word on the street is that Access-2000 doesn't run under Windows-7/Windows-8.

    I've just double-checked that I have indeed installed Access 2000 on a 32-bit Windows 7 PC, and I would imagine that it worked OK (no complaints after that). Certainly Word 2000 and Excel 2000 work OK in Windows 7; neved tried Outlook 2000 though. I've been happy with 7's backwards compatibility (no doubt at the cost of ever growing cruft and hidden crawling horrors that Raymond Chen will blog about); it's only Windows 7 64-bit where all the problems start cropping up.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @Gazzonyx said:
    @Cassidy said:

    Hmm.. okay. What about running them under Windows in a virtualised environment?

    I can't shake the feeling that WINE is still flaky, no matter what fanbois say.


    I'm a bit of a fanboy and I assure you, it's very, very flaky. Stuff that works from one version will break on another and getting anything non-trivial working can be a nightmare. According to their site Office-2000 should work under the version of WINE that I'm running, but it can't even get through the installer without crashing. Which is unfortunate because that's all I need to not have to dual boot at work.

    Have you tried Crossover Office?

    Personally, I just prefer to run a Win7 VM.


    I bought Crossover Games for my home use. :)

    Unfortunately, my desktop at work is about 6 years old and running VMs other than stripped down Linux boxes is out of the question. :/



  • @Cassidy said:

    I think their processes are a WTF in itself: you download a downloader that downloads the update. Why not just... give me the update in the first place?

    WTF 1: In Windows 7, open the Start menu and try searching for “Flash”. Third-party control panels aren't indexed as programs – you can only find them by opening Control Panel itself and then searching for them in Explorer's search box. How could Microsoft get this wrong? (It's not just Flash – you can't find Flash Player, Java or even the Mail (MAPI) control panels via Start menu search.)

    WTF 2: Open the Flash control panel, and ask for an update: all it will do is open the Flash page on Adobe's website and leave you to figure out whether you need an update or not, and to find the carefully concealed download link on the page. Of course, then you have to download the downloader, so that you can use that to download the installer, then close the browser you used for all this so that it will install. At work, I just keep the direct download links handy, but it took me ten minutes to find them again at home. I rebooted for Windows updates, then logged in as Administrator and waited for the Flash update window to appear (so that I could run it before I logged in as me and Firefox opened), and … and … the updater forgot to load. Hence the need to dig around manually. Seriously WTF is wrong with Adobe's update process?

    In other news, Firefox went all screwy on me, including overwriting the taskbar. Shame on me that it took me so long to realise that, of course, it ran out of GDI handles (I keep the GDI object count column visible in Process Explorer for a reason).



  • @Daniel Beardsmore said:

    WTF 1: In Windows 7, open the Start menu and try searching for “Flash”. Third-party control panels aren't indexed as programs – you can only find them by opening Control Panel itself and then searching for them in Explorer's search box. How could Microsoft get this wrong? (It's not just Flash – you can't find Flash Player, Java or even the Mail (MAPI) control panels via Start menu search.)
    No, the real WTF is that some items (such as ImDisk and nvidia) appear in search, while others (like aforementioned Flash and Java) don't (and I have no idea what's the criteria for an applet to appear in search results - it's definitely not 32-vs.-64-bit, since some 32-bit items are found, and some 64-bit aren't).



  • @ender said:

    (and I have no idea what's the criteria for an applet to appear in search results).

    How about:

    1) Does it have a name?

    I think that pretty much covers it.



  • @Daniel Beardsmore said:

    In Windows 7, open the Start menu and try searching for “Flash”. Third-party control panels aren't indexed as programs – you can only find them by opening Control Panel itself and then searching for them in Explorer's search box. How could Microsoft get this wrong? (It's not just Flash – you can't find Flash Player, Java or even the Mail (MAPI) control panels via Start menu search.)

    They come up for me. That said, for some reason I had to search for "java control" to get the Java control panel to come up. Go figure, I don't go into it often enough to warrant me caring if it pops up in search or not. If I need to go into a control panel I just type in what I want to do and I usually get what I want to pop up, or something close to it.


    [img]http://i49.tinypic.com/flwr41.png[/img]



  • @Douglasac said:

    Go figure, I don't go into it often enough to warrant me caring if it pops up in search or not. If I need to go into a control panel I just type in what I want to do and I usually get what I want to pop up, or something close to it.

    Weird. Of course, one of the differences between 7 and Vista, is that the start menu search indexes control panels and major settings, meaning that there's no need to go through the step of opening Control Panel first, nor any need for the end user to care whether a program is configured via a dedicated control panel, or a standalone executable.



  • @Daniel Beardsmore said:

    WTF 2: Open the Flash control panel, and ask for an update: all it will do is open the Flash page on Adobe's website and leave you to figure out whether you need an update or not, and to find the carefully concealed download link on the page.

    Oh, THAT. I think ATi's Catalyst shitware did the same to me - "check for updates" actually means "take me to a page where I can fill in all the information about my hardware and OS because I'm toocrap to pass all this info through myself".

    And worse still, the "driver" I downloaded off the drivers page was actually the Catalyst Utility, so I updated a control panel I don't use to a later version that still doesn't help me find the later driver.

    Oh, but there's a "Automatically Detect" tool that you can use that does what I expected the Catalyst Utility to do. It even checks for updated drivers for you! Zounds! So I download it, run it and.... apparently it's not compatible with the ATi drivers I have installed. Erm, Whiskey, Tango, Foxtrot?

    So I finally locate the driver by searching ("Googling" to you hip kids) and finding a forum post that links directly to the driver I want. Yay! 2012 drivers downloaded!

    Aaaanddd... Windows updates flags up that there's a newer driver. Dated 2009. With the exact version number that ships with Lenovo netbooks. That doesn't support HD.

    Ffffffffffffffff-rageface.gif

     



  • @Cassidy said:

    Oh, THAT. I think ATi's Catalyst shitware did the same to me - "check for updates" actually means "take me to a page where I can fill in all the information about my hardware and OS because I'm toocrap to pass all this info through myself".

    Yet another reason to go nVidia: the updater will download it for you and you don't need to screw around with that kind of crap.

    @Cassidy said:

    Oh, but there's a "Automatically Detect" tool that you can use that does what I expected the Catalyst Utility to do. It even checks for updated drivers for you! Zounds! So I download it, run it and.... apparently it's not compatible with the ATi drivers I have installed. Erm, Whiskey, Tango, Foxtrot?

    All the little autodetect utility does is open the appropriate webpage for you. In all fairness, nVidia's does the same, but instead does it via a Java plugin or ActiveX addon.



  • @Douglasac said:

    @Cassidy said:

    Oh, THAT. I think ATi's Catalyst shitware did the same to me - "check for updates" actually means "take me to a page where I can fill in all the information about my hardware and OS because I'm toocrap to pass all this info through myself".

    Yet another reason to go nVidia: the updater will download it for you and you don't need to screw around with that kind of crap.

    Sorry, should have made that more clear: SWMBO's tower, my new tower and our (potential) XBMC boxen contains nViddy.

    This netbook is a lenovo X100e where I'm stuck with ATiRageface, mobile shitcock edition.


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