At White Castle...



  • @CarnivorousHippie said:

    I have a fast-food receipt from 2008 taped to my cube wall which I keep as a reminder...  It's for $3.88 (two breakfast burritos), and printed near the bottom is:

    CTND    .12

    Yes, they print the Change To the Next Dollar on the receipt in case the carhops (that might be a clue) need to make change.

    This is why I no longer feel squeamish about using a credit card for a $4 meal.

    I wish my brother-in-law had saved the receipt from one of the first times we went to Hardees after they came out with the Thickburgers...they were still getting used to how to ring up the new stuff and managed to provide him with a receipt indicating he had ordered

    1 Cheeseburger

      No Vanilla

    Which was accurate, as far as that goes, but he was surprised they'd found it necessary to specify that particular option, since he didn't.



  • @nonpartisan said:

    If you won't take those, then you won't accept anything. Because any example I give you're going to point back to it being human-caused.

    Yeah, that was kind of my point. Congratulations on working that out on your own.

    @nonpartisan said:

    Pentium division bug?

    That was noteworthy exactly because it resulted in computers that did (in a rare circumstance) do math wrong. That's why it was news.

    @nonpartisan said:

    In this day and age, proofreading skills have translated into attention to detail.

    Except in your own writing, where you double-space. Which is clearly wrong.



  • @nonpartisan said:

    Not even you can be this dense.  But since I have time to kill while babysitting a vendor . . . I've calculated the amount of time left before the bus comes.  I've converted a CIDR prefix to a netmask.  I calculated the beginning and ending addresses for the new subnet.  I've figured out the number of extra spaces in my response post from last night and figured out the number of characters needed to render those in HTML as non-breaking spaces (258).  I've estimated the total of several items in a purchase so I knew whether I had enough cash or not.  These are all things that I consciously know I did; there have probably been several more that I did entirely unconsciously.  All without a calculator.

    The only things this proves is that you are an bored OCD person without a calculator.  A more valuable way to waste your time is to use a calculator and then use your brainpower in something more useful (hint: watching horseporn is more useful than this.



  • @serguey123 said:

    @nonpartisan said:

    Not even you can be this dense.  But since I have time to kill while babysitting a vendor . . . I've calculated the amount of time left before the bus comes.  I've converted a CIDR prefix to a netmask.  I calculated the beginning and ending addresses for the new subnet.  I've figured out the number of extra spaces in my response post from last night and figured out the number of characters needed to render those in HTML as non-breaking spaces (258).  I've estimated the total of several items in a purchase so I knew whether I had enough cash or not.  These are all things that I consciously know I did; there have probably been several more that I did entirely unconsciously.  All without a calculator.

    The only things this proves is that you are an bored OCD person without a calculator.  A more valuable way to waste your time is to use a calculator and then use your brainpower in something more useful (hint: watching horseporn is more useful than this.

    I'm scheduled to take the CCIE written exam in June.  I'll be expected to know, and perform, subnetting, routing metric calculations, spanning tree cost paths, etc.  After I get my CCIE certification, I may not perform those calculations on a daily basis.  But during the test, I will be expected to perform them without a calculator.  If I don't have a foundation in basic mathematics (let alone the more advanced mathematics that will be required for these) I'll never have a chance to succeed at it.

    As for the examples, you write like I intentionally sat down and focused on all of those.  Calculating the time for the bus was instantaneous while walking to the stop.  Changing the CIDR to a netmask and calculating the subnet addressing took a few seconds while the server admin was bringing up the screen to change the addressing.  I counted the number of spaces because who the hell is going to lose disk space over 43 stored space characters (hell, that's just slack space in 1 sector).  No one's going to miss the latest pr0n movie because of 43 characters, what with 2 TB drives these days.  Estimating the amount of the purchase was a very conscious calculation, yes.  There's nothing OCD about any of it; they were all strictly mathematical calculations that I do in the normal course of a day that I was able to do without the aid of a calculator.  And the only way I was able to do them was because I have a practical knowledge of basic mathematics.

     



  • @kilroo said:

    1 Cheeseburger

      No Vanilla

    Hopefully, this didn't spur the line cook to believe that "with vanilla" was the default setting for the Hardees Thickburger.

    Although, you can get a bacon shake, so why not?



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @nonpartisan said:
    Pentium division bug?

    That was noteworthy exactly because it resulted in computers that did (in a rare circumstance) do math wrong. That's why it was news.

    So it does meet your definition.  By your own admission, the computer did the math wrong due to this bug.  So I did find a WTF that qualifies.  And the irony is that it shouldn't qualify, because . . . computers don't do math wrong!!  Human error caused the problem!!

    @blakeyrat said:

    @nonpartisan said:
    In this day and age, proofreading skills have translated into attention to detail.

    Except in your own writing, where you double-space. Which is clearly wrong.

    By your standards perhaps.  And maybe I'm wrong.  But even if I am, does it really bother you that much?  Why are you going so apeshit over whether I use two spaces or one?

     



  • @CarnivorousHippie said:

    @kilroo said:

    1 Cheeseburger

      No Vanilla

    Hopefully, this didn't spur the line cook to believe that "with vanilla" was the default setting for the Hardees Thickburger.

    Although, you can get a bacon shake, so why not?

    Remember, this is a world where you can sell more jars of your peanut butter by plastering "Cholesterol Free!" across the label in big red letters.

     



  • @nonpartisan said:

    And the irony is that it shouldn't qualify, because . . . computers don't do math wrong!! Human error caused the problem!!

    But it wasn't a math error the human made, it was a logic error.

    @nonpartisan said:

    By your standards perhaps. And maybe I'm wrong.

    There is no doubt you are wrong.

    @nonpartisan said:

    But even if I am, does it really bother you that much?

    Yes, because I have to remove all your pointless &nbsp's from your text when I quote you. It would bother me less if Community Server just removed them when you hit "submit" but, eh. It's CS.

    @nonpartisan said:

    Why are you going so apeshit over whether I use two spaces or one?

    Because you can't brag about your attention to detail while demonstrably not paying attention to detail.



  • @nonpartisan said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    @nonpartisan said:
    Pentium division bug?
    That was noteworthy exactly because it resulted in computers that did (in a rare circumstance) do math wrong. That's why it was news.
    So it does meet your definition.  By your own admission, the computer did the math wrong due to this bug.  So I did find a WTF that qualifies.  And the irony is that it shouldn't qualify, because . . . computers don't do math wrong!!  Human error caused the problem!!

    @blakeyrat said:

    @nonpartisan said:
    In this day and age, proofreading skills have translated into attention to detail.
    Except in your own writing, where you double-space. Which is clearly wrong.
    By your standards perhaps.  And maybe I'm wrong.  But even if I am, does it really bother you that much?  Why are you going so apeshit over whether I use two spaces or one?

    I was taught in high school and college to double space after my periods and double space lines (which imo looks ugly).  I normally dont bother with two spacing after my periods since I did not see a benefit, but I now see a great benefit.  It annoys blakeyrat so I am going to do it whenever I remember.



  • @da Doctah said:

    Remember, this is a world where you can sell more jars of your peanut butter by plastering "Cholesterol Free!" across the label in big red letters.

    Don't forget the marshmallow packaging that says, "A Fat Free Food."



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @nonpartisan said:
    And the irony is that it shouldn't qualify, because . . . computers don't do math wrong!! Human error caused the problem!!

    But it wasn't a math error the human made, it was a logic error.

    But I never said it was a math error on the human's part.  I just said it was a human error.  Pedanticness FTW!!!! @blakeyrat said:

    @nonpartisan said:
    But even if I am, does it really bother you that much?

    Yes, because I have to remove all your pointless &nbsp's from your text when I quote you. It would bother me less if Community Server just removed them when you hit "submit" but, eh. It's CS.

    You must be using the plain editor then. I don't see that in the standard editor. Doesn't bother me. But if it drives you nuts, quote this part of my reply. Consider it a gift.@blakeyrat said:

    @nonpartisan said:
    Why are you going so apeshit over whether I use two spaces or one?

    Because you can't brag about your attention to detail while demonstrably not paying attention to detail.

    I pay attention to detail.  I make sure that every sentence has two spaces after it.  (Except for the previous part of my reply because I'm kind.)

    Tell you what . . . I'll meet you halfway.  I'll put two spaces after periods, exclamation points and question marks, but I'll only put one space after commas and semicolons.  Fair deal.



  • @boomzilla said:

    @da Doctah said:
    Remember, this is a world where you can sell more jars of your peanut butter by plastering "Cholesterol Free!" across the label in big red letters.
    Don't forget the marshmallow packaging that says, "A Fat Free Food."

    Throw "asbestos-free", "mercury-free", "arsenic-free", and "fewer bug parts by volume than the competitor's brand" on the label, and you've got the perfect food.



  • @nonpartisan said:

    during the test, I will be expected to perform them without a calculator.

    Ughh, so we are back at this... as I said before.... "outside of academia this skills are practically dead"

    @nonpartisan said:

    As for the examples, you write like I intentionally sat down and focused on all of those

    Maybe, maybe not, I'm not privy to how dumb or intelligent you are, but you intentionally sat down and focused on typeing all those examples on this fora so a degree of forethought is a given.

    @nonpartisan said:

    I counted the number of spaces because who the hell is going to lose disk space over 43 stored space characters (hell, that's just slack space in 1 sector).

    So you admit to this one

    @nonpartisan said:

    There's nothing OCD about any of it

    I beg to differ

    @nonpartisan said:

    they were all strictly mathematical calculations that I do in the normal course of a day that I was able to do without the aid of a calculator.

    Are you expecting some sort of award? A parade? A short essay titled: "Surviving a day without a calculator, living on the edge"

    @nonpartisan said:

    the only way I was able to do them was because I have a practical knowledge of basic mathematics.

    A great tale for your kids so that they don't skip on their homework



  • @nonpartisan said:

    Tell you what . . . I'll meet you halfway.  I'll put two spaces after periods, exclamation points and question marks, but I'll only put one space after commas and semicolons.  Fair deal.

    Not me,  because I' m going to start using 2 after every comma,  3 after sentences,  and 1 after apostrophes.   It' ll be quite fun,  I think.   ( And you get the pleasure of finding where I missed things!   )



  • @serguey123 said:

    Ughh, so we are back at this... as I said before.... "outside of academia this skills are practically dead"

    I guess we have different definitions of "academia".  When I hear (or read) "academia", I picture a formalized school environment.  I don't regard this to be a formalized school environment.  I will admit that I may need to broaden my definition.

    That said, if I interview a network engineer on a routed access layer and ask him/her/it to come up with a subnet plan using /25 production subnets and /30 uplinks between access/distribution and distribution/core, I would expect him/her/it to be able to do it without whipping out a calculator.  I certainly wouldn't consider a job interview to be "academia," and I would certainly question said skills if they couldn't be done without a calculator.

    @serguey123 said:

    Maybe, maybe not, I'm not privy to how dumb or intelligent you are, but you intentionally sat down and focused on typeing all those examples on this fora so a degree of forethought is a given.

    Only because of the subject matter of this thread.  I don't normally sit back and consider "Hmmm, where have I used math today??"@serguey123 said:

    @nonpartisan said:

    I counted the number of spaces because who the hell is going to lose disk space over 43 stored space characters (hell, that's just slack space in 1 sector).

    So you admit to this one

    Yes, because there was a point -- that 43 spaces is not going to break anyone's hard drive these days.  43 added characters is a rounding error in the total drive's capacity.

    @serguey123 said:

    @nonpartisan said:

    There's nothing OCD about any of it

    I beg to differ

    If you want to differ, that's fine.  No need to beg about it.

    @serguey123 said:

    @nonpartisan said:

    the only way I was able to do them was because I have a practical knowledge of basic mathematics.

    A great tale for your kids so that they don't skip on their homework

    Wow.  There are people in this thread that don't realize how much math they do on a daily basis that would be very difficult/impossible to do without a basic foundation.  Hell, without a basic foundation you wouldn't even know what buttons to push on the calculator to even try to get a result.  I'm not trying to be a braggart; I'm just trying (see blakey, only one space after the semicolon, just like I promised) that people use math more often in their daily lives than they realize.  And if certain people on this thread want to be dense and not understand that, well, it really is fine with me if they want to deny reality.



  • @nonpartisan said:

    I'm just trying (see blakey, only one space after the semicolon, just like I promised) to show that people use math more often in their daily lives than they realize.

    inb4 "haha, you made an error hee hee hee!!!"



  • @nonpartisan said:

    if I interview a network engineer on a routed access layer and ask him/her/it to come up with a subnet plan using /25 production subnets and /30 uplinks between access/distribution and distribution/core, I would expect him/her/it to be able to do it without whipping out a calculator.  I certainly wouldn't consider a job interview to be "academia," and I would certainly question said skills if they couldn't be done without a calculator.

    I'm not an engineer so I have no idea whether this is a good idea but I hope you rely on more than this to hire somebody.

    @nonpartisan said:

    Yes, because there was a point -- that 43 spaces is not going to break anyone's hard drive these days.  43 added characters is a rounding error in the total drive's capacity.

    So only pointless OCD is OCD?

    @nonpartisan said:

    There are people in this thread that don't realize how much math they do on a daily basis that would be very difficult/impossible to do without a basic foundation.  Hell, without a basic foundation you wouldn't even know what buttons to push on the calculator to even try to get a result.  I'm not trying to be a braggart; I'm just trying (see blakey, only one space after the semicolon, just like I promised) that people use math more often in their daily lives than they realize.  And if certain people on this thread want to be dense and not understand that, well, it really is fine with me if they want to deny reality.

    How basic is basic? Elementary school math? Because that is the only everyday use of math you can get.  Also the brain tend to remember the stuff you use so if you remember you use it, if you don't then your brain tends to drop it and focus on horse porn.



  • @serguey123 said:

    @nonpartisan said:
    if I interview a network engineer on a routed access layer and ask him/her/it to come up with a subnet plan using /25 production subnets and /30 uplinks between access/distribution and distribution/core, I would expect him/her/it to be able to do it without whipping out a calculator.  I certainly wouldn't consider a job interview to be "academia," and I would certainly question said skills if they couldn't be done without a calculator.

    I'm not an engineer so I have no idea whether this is a good idea but I hope you rely on more than this to hire somebody.

    serguey123, I think you've outdone yourself with this comment. Truly, well done.



  • @serguey123 said:

    The only things this proves is that you are an bored OCD person without a calculator.  A more valuable way to waste your time is to use a calculator and then use your brainpower in something more useful (hint: watching horseporn is more useful than this.

    @serguey123 said:

    How basic is basic? Elementary school math? Because that is the only everyday use of math you can get.  Also the brain tend to remember the stuff you use so if you remember you use it, if you don't then your brain tends to drop it and focus on horse porn.

    I'm seeing a pattern here.  I hope Zunesis doesn't chime in; he's probably an authority on horse porn.



  • I think serguey123 thinks that referencing horse porn makes him edgy and funny like some of the other posters on this forum arguably are.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    Because the division by intelligence is usually just a division by class and family environment. Also, a lot of intelligence metrics are sadly one-dimensional. The result is that people who are good at taking standardized tests and who have a stable home life do okay whereas extremely bright people who don't do well at tests (or who are improperly motivated) or who have an unstable home life do poorly and get shunted into manual labor.

    I don't see much difference between this happening at age of 14 or 18. At some point you have to choose who goes to university, who goes to college and who starts working. And would be inclined to think that a good teacher can motivate the children to shoot for higher education at 14. But good teacher is most important in either case.

    @morbiuswilters said:

    And it happens in the US, it just isn't as inevitable as it seems to be in Europe. It also seems it was less likely to happen in the past here, but our education system has been failing for decades.

    It's failing in most European countries too.

    @briverymouse said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    I also think people should learn certain practical skills from school. I see basic woodworking as something most people should know, along with basic mechanics, basic finance and basic housekeeping. As a practical matter, how often do students in the lowest high school (in the US "high school" usually means 9th through 12th grades whereas in Europe it seems to mean anything past 4th or 6th grade) end up in university? These kids are, what, 10 years old when their life is being decided for them? (Ironically, I would have thrived in such a system--at 10 I was exceptional at standardized tests, had perfect grades and scored very high on IQ tests, but by the time I was 16 I stopped giving a shit and had mediocre grades and test scores. As it is, I enrolled in a couple of years of very cheap community college but skipped most of my classes. I dropped out eventually, which I'm very happy about because I wasted very little time or money on college and I seemed to learn more than most of the people who did go to college. I also make more money than most of them.)

    We don't work with tests to decide which school people go to, the parents choose (at age 12). You can still change to a different type of school relatively easily until about age 14 to 16 (you have some catching up to do, of course, but nothing that a motivated teacher can't solve in a few months). At what age do you propose a child is old enough to choose? Americans seem to think this is age 18, but this means everything you learn up to then is general knowledge. You think that is a good thing, but I disagree. I'm happy my high school prepared me for one of the best engineering schools in the world, instead of teaching me woodworking. I don't see why I would ever need that skill in later life.

    Here (Czechia, the country that can't get it's crap together to officially use it's correct English name) it used to be 1st to 8th grade basic school split in two parts, with the first being same for everybody and the second having optional specialization, more to keep the too curious occupied than to provide any real difference. Some practical skills like basic woodworking were included in the 7th and 8th grade (they are only now talking about also including basic finance). Than everybody chose (the students signed up; I don't remember whether it even had parent's signature) how to continue after 8th grade.

    After revolution, sometime around 1993, they added extended basic school with 9th grade (fine, there is more and more to learn) and added the "8-year gymnasium" starting with 6th grade. I didn't think it was reasonable back than and I still don't. Exactly because it leaves the basic schools without the motivated to lead the way, somewhat reduces the choice (switching schools is still possible, but not everybody will) and didn't seem to be needed anyway. However I do think the choice of high schools is reasonable, because at 15 most children know what they are good at and what not, so specialized high school gives them head start in the subjects of their choice, be it for continuing on college or starting work. And most high schools still do teach the generic subjects, so switching between them is still possible as is going to college of different specialization.

    @briverymouse said:

    It's not a division by class. Sure, when you are improperly motivated at home, you don't perform well at school. But teachers do everything they can to motivate children, and I don't see what more the education system can do. You can keep hoping they will someday decide to start studying and go to university, but what are the odds? On the contrary, if teachers before high school see that children are intelligent (not by any standardized test, but by following them for a whole year), they can often convince the parents to send them to a high school that prepares them for university. From there on, they are surrounded by other intelligent, hard-working children and will be motivated by that, instead of only being friends with people from the same class, whose parents are often just as non-motivating.

    I can only agree here. The teachers usually have more authority in lower grades, so delaying the decision too long does not help. If the teachers find the talented and send them to elite school, they will be motivated there by having smart colleagues, while if they continue to to visit the high school in their poor neighbourhood, they will shine there, but won't have the motivation, because they won't have much competition.

    But in the end it depends on having good teachers to recognize the talents and motivate them. Which is more and more of a problem, because the government can't get decent budget for paying them despite always declaring education their highest priority. Which is the real issue and is much more important than which grade children choose which path.



  • @CarnivorousHippie said:

    @boomzilla said:

    @da Doctah said:
    Remember, this is a world where you can sell more jars of your peanut butter by plastering "Cholesterol Free!" across the label in big red letters.
    Don't forget the marshmallow packaging that says, "A Fat Free Food."

    Throw "asbestos-free", "mercury-free", "arsenic-free", and "fewer bug parts by volume than the competitor's brand" on the label, and you've got the perfect food.

    Recently I've read about law (I am not sure whether it was passed or only proposed) to forbid food packages to advertise features implicit in given substance. I am not sure whether it's bigger WTF that people fall for those things or that we have laws to protect people from themselves. Though lying (on packages and such) certainly does have to be prohibited, because otherwise you couldn't trust anything and while this is not outright lying, it's serious misleading.



  • @serguey123 said:

    I'm not an engineer so I have no idea
    whether this is a good idea but I hope you rely on more than this to
    hire somebody.

    Really?  You truly think I would only hire
    someone based on whether they could subnet or not?  On a single skill? 
    Would you hire someone strictly on the basis of whether they could pass
    fizzbuzz or not?  I would never consider the possibility that you would
    hire based only on fizzbuzz or not; I would expect to be given a similar
    courtesy when I discuss tests I might use in the hiring process.  So
    no, working out subnets is not the only skill on which I interview, but
    it is a critical skill that an engineer needs to be able to do quickly
    and accurately, regardless of whether a calculator is available or not.
    @serguey123 said:

    So only pointless OCD is OCD?

    Counting
    spaces for a single purpose is not OCD.  My continuing to reply to why
    it's not OCD is more OCD than counting spaces for one very specific purpose.[quote
    user="serguey123"]How basic is basic? Elementary school math? Because
    that is the only everyday use of math you can get.[/quote]Thank you. 
    That is exactly my point.  Blakey emphasizing "Why should kids be taught
    math?!?!??!?!?!  The fucking computer can do it without error!!!! 
    USELESS USELESS USELESS!!!!!!!!!!!!" was primarily over a simple, basic
    skill:  being able to accurately make change.  Basic addition and
    subtraction; the only complication is a decimal point.  Elementary
    school math.  I believe that if our kids did not learn basic mathematics
    -- addition, subtraction, multiplication and division -- they would
    have major problems functioning in the world on a day-to-day basis.



  • @dhromed said:

     Also,

    http://thebestpageintheuniverse.net/c.cgi?u=math

    As a former teacher of mathematics, I approve of this page.



  • There hasn't been a White Castle in the area where I live for many, many years.  I didn't even know they were still in business until recently I was at the grocery store and noticed that you can buy frozen White Castle hamburgers and cheeseburgers that you cook in the microwave.  There's a pretty good WTF.



  • @El_Heffe said:

    There hasn't been a White Castle in the area where I live for many, many years.  I didn't even know they were still in business until recently I was at the grocery store and noticed that you can buy frozen White Castle hamburgers and cheeseburgers that you cook in the microwave.  There's a pretty good WTF.

    I've only seen a couple, the only one I remember the place was actually in NY,NY.



  • @Bulb said:

    Recently I've read about law (I am not sure whether it was passed or only proposed) to forbid food packages to advertise features implicit in given substance. I am not sure whether it's bigger WTF that people fall for those things or that we have laws to protect people from themselves. Though lying (on packages and such) certainly does have to be prohibited, because otherwise you couldn't trust anything and while this is not outright lying, it's serious misleading.
     

    "Contains fewer shards of broken glass than the better-selling brand of bean soup!"

    Now for the question.  Does the above law conflict in any way with the symbol on a jar of Bac-Os imitation bacon bits that certify the product as kosher?  How about the corresponding symbol on a box of ZipLoc plastic food storage bags?


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @da Doctah said:

    "Contains fewer shards of broken glass than the better-selling brand of bean soup!"

    Isn't that only 'justifiable' if the better-selling brand of bean soup has had a non-zero number of shards in it (and assuming the brand making the claim has had zero?)



  • @PJH said:

    @da Doctah said:
    "Contains fewer shards of broken glass than the better-selling brand of bean soup!"
    Isn't that only 'justifiable' if the better-selling brand of bean soup has had a non-zero number of shards in it (and assuming the brand making the claim has had zero?)

    I'd have thunk that too. Saying "No glass shards" implies that competiors have glass shards, but da Doctah's quote is probably too specific for them to get away with that.

    I know Colgate advertises that none of their toothpaste contains sugar - does Macleans then automatically have sugar in it?



  • @heterodox said:
    I think serguey123 thinks that referencing horse porn makes him edgy and funny like some of the other posters on this forum arguably are.

     
    Imitation is the highest form of praise
     
    @nonpartisan said:
    Really?  You truly think I would only hire someone based on whether they could subnet or not?  On a single skill? 
     
    I don't know you so I have no idea
     
    @nonpartisan said:
    it is a critical skill that an engineer needs to be able to do quickly and accurately, regardless of whether a calculator is available or not.
     
    I take your word for it but I can't conceive a situation when you don't have a calculator available (you have cellphone right?) nor as a relevant interview question.
     @nonpartisan said:
    Counting spaces for a single purpose is not OCD.  My continuing to reply to why it's not OCD is more OCD than counting spaces for one very specific purpose.[
     
    So you see the problem? Great!
     
    @nonpartisan said:
    being able to accurately make change
     
    Nobody on Earth has that problem, there is an app for that! or a calculator. ;)
     
     @nonpartisan said:
    I believe that if our kids did not learn basic mathematics -- addition, subtraction, multiplication and division -- they would have major problems functioning in the world on a day-to-day basis.
     
    Perhaps, but I haven't seen any conclusive evidence to support that theory
     
     


  • @Zemm said:

    @PJH said:
    @da Doctah said:
    "Contains fewer shards of broken glass than the better-selling brand of bean soup!"
    Isn't that only 'justifiable' if the better-selling brand of bean soup has had a non-zero number of shards in it (and assuming the brand making the claim has had zero?)
    I'd have thunk that too. Saying "No glass shards" implies that competiors have glass shards, but da Doctah's quote is probably too specific for them to get away with that.

    Claiming that product A has no glass shards, no added salt/sugar, no GMO, etc., does not imply that any other product does.  (People are free to infer it, but that's not the same.)  I've eaten monkey entrails off the chest of an Elbonian hooker zero times; that doesn't mean that some other person has done so.

    "Contains fewer shards of glass" is different.  That states that given the number X (where X is an element of N) of glass shards in my bean soup, there exists some other bean soup that contains at least X+1 glass shards.



  • @CarnivorousHippie said:

    "Contains fewer shards of glass" is different.  That states that given the number X (where X is an element of N) of glass shards in my bean soup, there exists some other bean soup that contains at least X+1 glass shards.
     

    If there has ever been even a single shard of glass found in a container of brand P bean soup, brand Q is perfectly within its rights to make the above claim until such time as they get caught similarly.  Assuming brand P has been around for six or seven decades, you can pretty much count on there being at least one instance of such contamination in its history.

    On a side question brought up earlier in the thread, I just checked my tube of Dr Ken's toothpaste, and it contains both "sorbitol" and "stevia", presumably as sweetening agents.  While these are not technically "sugar" in even the generic sense, I can easily imagine other brands using things that do fit that broad definition.  (I use Dr Ken's because it's the only brand I can find that doesn't contain sodium lauryl sulfate; I gag easily on the huge masses of foam that every other toothpaste produces.)



  • @da Doctah said:

    I gag easily on the huge masses of foam

    That's what SHE said!!





  • @CarnivorousHippie said:

    (People are free to infer it, but that's not the same.)
     

    I knew someone was going to mention the difference between implication and inference.



  • @Zemm said:

    @CarnivorousHippie said:

    (People are free to infer it, but that's not the same.)
     

    I knew someone was going to mention the difference between implication and inference.

    You know what they say: infer a penny, infer a pound.

     



  • @da Doctah said:

    @Zemm said:

    @CarnivorousHippie said:

    (People are free to infer it, but that's not the same.)
     

    I knew someone was going to mention the difference between implication and inference.

    You know what they say: infer a penny, infer a pound.
     

    And for two dollars you can have my cousin.

     



  • @mrsparkyman said:

    And for two cheeseburgers you can have my cousin.

    FTFY


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