Banking WTFs



  • Recently, I tried to purchase the Indie Gala. The charge was denied and my card was blocked. After unblocking it, I decided to purchase Minecraft for a mini LAN party I have every week. The charge was denied and my card was blocked.


    Upon inquiring, I found that my bank blocks all charges originating from overseas. Their reasoning was that it's fine for people in the US to scam US citizens, but not for foreigners to scam them. Judging by the fact that no one else in the group has this problem and the fact that a friend bought a second copy for me with no problems, I believe it's just my bank that does this. When I inquired how I should make overseas purchases, this is what I was told:



    1. Sign paper at bank stating that, at some future time, I intend to make an online purchase from another country
    2. Make online purchase, which will be denied
    3. Call a number and verify that, yes, I did intend to buy something with my own money
    4. Make online purchase again, which will hopefully go through this time

    I think I'll just not buy things from overseas individuals now, thanks.


  •  Pretty curious conclusions. I would have just closed immediattely my bank account.



  • @Kaulesh said:

    I found that my bank blocks all charges originating from overseas. I believe it's just my bank that does this.

    You don't say?

     



  • It's not just banks that have WTF's involving overseas stuff. Couple years ago I went to Texas, and when I tried to log into Facebook, it rejected my credentials. There was a message saying they thought someone might be trying to hack my account, and if I was traveling abroad, I should enable some option somewhere to allow logging from other countries. But in order to do so, I'd have to login to my account, which would involve flying a few thousand miles back home (or using a VPN, which I couldd have done back then).



  • That seems extremely proactive. I'd guess they've been burned pretty badly. I've never had this problem, though when I travel abroad I make sure to let them know where I'll be going to prevent the automatic fraud stuff to cut me off.



  • @Kaulesh said:

    I think I'll just not buy things from overseas individuals now, thanks.
     

    Or you could just use a bank that isn't so paranoid when it comes to international purchases.

    I've had my card stopped a couple of times and the bank ring me to enquire about suspected fraud; I got it cleared pretty quickly and although it's an inconvenience it's there for protection reasons.

    If you don't agree with that bank's policies, vote with your feet.

    (footnote: reminds me of the Verizon email embargo)



  • @Cassidy said:

    I've had my card stopped a couple of times and the bank ring me to enquire about suspected fraud; I got it cleared pretty quickly and although it's an inconvenience it's there for protection reasons.

    Yeah, my financial institutions* tend to block suspicious charges (and even freeze the whole card sometimes) but I'll get an email or call soon thereafter and can merrily go on my way. It usually happens with: larger Internet orders (over $1k); while traveling; overseas purchases. I guess it can kind of be a tad annoying at times, but it's understandable. Probably the most annoying is when I am on a road trip and they notice the multi-state gas purchases and cut me off. Have they never seen someone drive across a few states before?

    • Amex, Chase, B of A, Citi, Discover


  • @morbiuswilters said:

    Have they never seen someone drive across a few states before?

    Yeah, but it's usually televised and involves Thelma, Louise, OJ or Woody Harleson in conjunction with an exciting five-oh chase.

    Perhaps you're not important enough to the Plastic Makers.



  • Funny thing is World of Warcraft did that too, back when I was playing. Even though I had the authenticator to prevent just that, they still did it. So what's the point of the damn authenticator?!

    @Renan said:

    It's not just banks that have WTF's involving overseas stuff. Couple years ago I went to Texas, and when I tried to log into Facebook, it rejected my credentials. There was a message saying they thought someone might be trying to hack my account, and if I was traveling abroad, I should enable some option somewhere to allow logging from other countries. But in order to do so, I'd have to login to my account, which would involve flying a few thousand miles back home (or using a VPN, which I couldd have done back then).



  • @Cassidy said:

    Or you could just use a bank that isn't so paranoid when it comes to international purchases.

    I would love to, but my car's out of commission and there is only one bank in town. That's probably why they can get away with it.



  •  I've never been blocked, but I have had a few phone calls from Mastercard's fraud division.

    1) Travelling from Toronto to Halifax by car.  They didn't like the string of fill-ups across the country.

    2) My brother-in-laws wedding (The day before).  Apparently, a $120 fillup (3 cars on one transaction) and $1200 at the liquor store raises some flags.

    My wife and I went to the Cook Islands a few weeks later.  You can be sure I phoned them before travelling saying "I'm going to be in the Cook Islands.  Don't block anything under $1000 from .ck, .nz )

     

     

     

     



  • @Kaulesh said:

    I found that my bank blocks all charges originating from overseas.
    Do we need a banking sub-forum? Anyway - you seem to have omitted to mention the bank involved - name and shame please!



  • @Kaulesh said:

    @Cassidy said:

    Or you could just use a bank that isn't so paranoid when it comes to international purchases.

    I would love to, but my car's out of commission and there is only one bank in town. That's probably why they can get away with it.

    Internet banking? I haven't needed to go inside a physical bank for many years.



  • @mightybaldking said:

    $1200 at the liquor store

    Jesus, dude.



  • @mightybaldking said:

     I've never been blocked, but I have had a few phone calls from Mastercard's fraud division.

    1) Travelling from Toronto to Halifax by car.  They didn't like the string of fill-ups across the country.

    2) My brother-in-laws wedding (The day before).  Apparently, a $120 fillup (3 cars on one transaction) and $1200 at the liquor store raises some flags.

    My wife and I went to the Cook Islands a few weeks later.  You can be sure I phoned them before travelling saying "I'm going to be in the Cook Islands.  Don't block anything under $1000 from .ck, .nz )

     

     

     

     

    Last time I went to the US I bought some tickets from Delta Airlines. They charged me twice for each ticket. So my card went over the limit. When I told Delta about it they reversed the charges, but the damage was already done, since Mastercard would only fix the mistaken charges on their ends two months later (there is some retarded "process" they must follow in such cases, which takes that long). They kept fucking up and the next month I wasn't even charged anything because there was some problem with my account. And then on the month after that they charged for every use I'd done in two months, and finally had a $600 charge undone on my billings. But durnig most of the time I spent in TX my card was useless, and I'd be fucked if I didn't have another one.



  • @PJH said:

    Anyway - you seem to have omitted to mention the bank involved - name and shame please!

    Not much to look at - have fun!


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Kaulesh said:

    Recently, I tried to purchase the Indie Gala. The charge was denied and my card was blocked. After unblocking it, I decided to purchase Minecraft for a mini LAN party I have every week. The charge was denied and my card was blocked.


    Upon inquiring, I found that my bank blocks all charges originating from overseas. Their reasoning was that it's fine for people in the US to scam US citizens, but not for foreigners to scam them. Judging by the fact that no one else in the group has this problem and the fact that a friend bought a second copy for me with no problems, I believe it's just my bank that does this. When I inquired how I should make overseas purchases, this is what I was told:



    1. Sign paper at bank stating that, at some future time, I intend to make an online purchase from another country
    2. Make online purchase, which will be denied
    3. Call a number and verify that, yes, I did intend to buy something with my own money
    4. Make online purchase again, which will hopefully go through this time

    I think I'll just not buy things from overseas individuals now, thanks.

    Which, of course, is exactly what they want, because that way they don't have to deal with it.



  • @Kaulesh said:

    @PJH said:
    Anyway - you seem to have omitted to mention the bank involved - name and shame please!

    Not much to look at - have fun!

    Goddamn, dude:

    • Rendering is all messed up in Chrome
    • Right-click seems disabled
    • Uses frames
    • Written in ColdFusion
    • Login form served over HTTP, so might as well not even bother with HTTPS


    You trust your money with these people?



  • @FrostCat said:

    Which, of course, is exactly what they want, because that way they don't have to deal with it.

    How does this make sense? I don't know about his bank, but my bank definitely wants me to spend money. It's no hassle for them.



  • I like my bank. I bought a $1200 plane ticket from THY, and I got a call 5 minutes later asking about it. When the person introduced themself, I just said, "Yes, I did just buy a $1200 airplane ticket." They said "Ok. Thank you. Have a good day."

    When the trip itself came, I did have issues trying to use ATMs at first. Turned out Visa was blocking the transaction before it even got to the bank.


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