Job-ad: Just WTF is involved in this job?



  •  "Assistant
    Desktop Engineer - Xville We are currently recruiting for a assistant
    desktop engineer's to be involved in a Windows 7 upgrade. You will
    ideally have some experience within a IT desktop environment. Any
    rollout experience would be advantageous. You must be well presented
    with excellent communication skills. Have your own car and tools. This
    role is to start 29.02.12 for 2 days. Must have your own Steele top
    capped boots."

    Steel-capped boots? The mind boggles as to why.



  • Maybe they're replacing old Windows 2000 systems and don't want anybody to get hurt by dropping a 17" CRT monitor on their foot.



  • @GreyWolf said:

    Steel-capped boots? The mind boggles as to why.
    There is this place called the manufacturing industry where they actually make things rather than sit around in nice cushy cubicles and just push electrons around. In general any place that actually does manufacturing requires personal safety equipment such as hearing, eye, head and foot protection, and while it is common for most places to have spare generic hearing and eye and head protection on tap, having spare safety boots is not that common. Besides you'll be far more comfortable in your own pair of nicely worn in safety boots.

    I've been on some shop floors that required ear, eye, head and foot protection as well as long pants, long sleeved shirts, gloves and orange safety vests - and doing so in the middle of summer at temps more than 36 deg C.

    I also had to have safety boots at one place that specifically had metatarsal coverage, which may have made it safer for my feet if something got dropped on them, but the added protection actually made it less safe to climb ladders due to the metatarsal coverage potentially catching on the ladder rung.



  • Either the desktops are located inside a warehouse and everyone who works there is required to wear basic safety gear, or they expect to commemerate the victory of Windows 7 over the forces of Vista and XP by carving a series of rectangular stone slabs.

     

    Both explanations seem equally plausible to me.

     

     



  • There are also some places where users are living, breathing collections of WTF atoms and need a decent kicking.

    Steel toecaps are a requirement for personal health and safety, and usually result a better productivity per kick ration.



  •  I was seriously tempted to buy a pair of safety boots just to be able to apply for this job.Pure curiousity.

    Unfortunately, the contract is only 2 days long, and the cheapest pair of boots I can find costs the equivalent of one day's take-home pay. And I'd never use them again.



  • Recruiter misunderstood what was involved when the client said they were doing a "forklift upgrade" of their environment?

    Seriously though, as others have pointed out, many environments require PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) even if you're only doing light duty work. My favorite story involves a local mine. The cafeteria at the local hospital won the contract to provide overtime meal service. The cafeteria workers wear scrubs as part of their uniform. When delivering meals to the mine, they're required to don a Hard hat, safety vest, safety glasses with side shields, and steel toe boots with metatarsal covers (plus remove all jewelry). I hear it looks pretty ridiculous.



  • @GreyWolf said:

    Steel-capped boots? The mind boggles as to why.
     

    It's an obvious and common [url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKWvk4eoMH4"]job requirement[/url]



  • I like the way they use the recruiting buzzwords, they add "Engineer" to make it sound important but qualify that with "Assistant" to justify that it pays peanuts.

     



  • If you take a job in the exciting manufacturing sector, you won't have electrons to push around anymore.



  • @GreyWolf said:

    Steel-capped boots? The mind boggles as to why.
    Generally, it's box-ticking, but I have been on a few sites where there were building works going on at the same time, so steelies were necessary.

    A while ago the wife did a job installing new PCs - again, in a bank - where they not only had to wear safety-boots, but also hard-hats because they were crawling under desks, and had to try and plug in (and screw the retaining screws in on) all the cables and so-on whilst wearing thick leather gloves. Oh, and there was an extra person on site whose sole job was opening cardboard boxes with a box-cutter because no-one else was allowed a blade. If I remember rightly, there was also a ban on removing cable-ties once they were fixed in place - not sure if that was H&S or 'security' - even if you'd just installed one in the wrong place. You had to put in a change request to have it removed by the maintenance team (who weren't yet employed, since the site wasn't yet live). If I remember rightly, that ended up taking roughly half a man-day per PC installation.

    If you have nothing better to do, I heartily recommend relocations and deployments purely for the entertainment value. On the very rare occasions when the job isn't a complete WTF from start to finish, everything goes so quickly that you'll be out of there in a quarter or a third of a shift, and it's normal to be paid for the whole shift. The rest of the time, you'll see too many WTFs to count.

    Oh, and you should be able to pick up a pair of safety boots online for $20-30 or so.



  • @EncoreSpod said:

    I like the way they use the recruiting buzzwords, they add "Engineer" to make it sound important
    I think that's part of selling to the client - it's a lot easier to sell the services of 'an engineer' at hundreds of dollars a day. Don't knock it - car insurance is a lot cheaper as an engineer than an IT contractor...



  • @fterfi secure said:

    Don't knock it - car insurance is a lot cheaper as an engineer than an IT contractor...

    Wait, what?



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @fterfi secure said:
    Don't knock it - car insurance is a lot cheaper as an engineer than an IT contractor...

    Wait, what?

    At least here in the UK, your job title makes a big difference to car insurance costs. I checked with my insurance company at the time, and they said the most suitable category for 'deployment engineer' is 'engineer' rather than 'IT contractor'. Who am I to argue if engineers are seen as a much safer risk?



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @fterfi secure said:
    Don't knock it - car insurance is a lot cheaper as an engineer than an IT contractor...

    Wait, what?

    Compare them on this website - I was surprised at how much they can differ.



  • @OzPeter said:

    I also had to have safety boots at one place that specifically had metatarsal coverage, which may have made it safer for my feet if something got dropped on them, but the added protection actually made it less safe to climb ladders due to the metatarsal coverage potentially catching on the ladder rung.

     Would this be a certain large metals manufacturer?

     In order to get past the gate house in addition to wearing all of the above I had to watch a 30 minute safety video, go through 320 PowerPoint sildes (I wish I was making that up -- they spanned two PowerPoint presentations), and a 20 question safety quiz.

     Oh, and if I dared take off either the hard hat or the safety vest while sitting in the conference room I was working in I got yelled at. I've never felt goofier -- sitting behind a nice table, in a Herman Miller chair, with my laptop, in a fully-furnished room decked out in safety gear, because that's what they require of all contractors -- regardless of the specialty being contracted.

     



  • @lincolnjkc said:

     Oh, and if I dared take off either the hard hat or the safety vest while sitting in the conference room I was working in I got yelled at.

    That's probably the single most effective part of the entire training session. Maybe they make you sit through so much guff just to make sufficient time for you to take off your helmet so you get yelled at. Trained.



  • @mott555 said:

    Maybe they're replacing old Windows 2000 systems and don't want anybody to get hurt by dropping a 17" CRT monitor on their foot.

     

    My brother in law worked at a piggery and they were forbidden to wear steel-capped boots. If a sow stands on your foot it is broken. If she stands on a steel-capped boot it will buckle and cause more issues, like making it almost impossible to take it off for the medical people to tend to your broken foot.

    (Apparently)

     

     



  • @Zemm said:

    If a sow stands on your foot it is broken.
     

    Que?

    Pigs are about the same weight as people, are they not? If a fat dude stands on my foot, I get ouchie but it's not broken.



  • @dhromed said:

    @Zemm said:

    If a sow stands on your foot it is broken.
     

    Que?

    Pigs are about the same weight as people, are they not? If a fat dude stands on my foot, I get ouchie but it's not broken.

    Not sure of the exact dimensions, but a pig hoof is probably ~3 sq in.,whereas a fat guy foot in a shoe is more like 48 sq in. So the ballpark pressure ratio is ~8:1 per leg. Also, some domestic pigs can be upwards of 500 lbs or more.


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