Bobby Tables gets a car



  • Apologies if these are really old, but I hadn't seen them before.

    Link
    Link



  •  Fun!

    On the first one, do you think the ' is an actual keyboard prime in that font, or an unicode apo’strophe? In the second case, it wouldn't work, obiously. :<br>



  • Sort of related: There's a guy around my office whose plates are all ones and zeroes. Makes it really hard to read, since the ones run together. I suppose a camera would have no problem, but trying to quickly read the plate as he's driving is pretty difficult.



  • @boomzilla said:

    Sort of related: There's a guy around my office whose plates are all ones and zeroes. Makes it really hard to read, since the ones run together. I suppose a camera would have no problem, but trying to quickly read the plate as he's driving is pretty difficult.
     

    I have to wonder if, in this day and age, tracking down these "clever" license plates is easier. Consider:

    "It was a red car, and I think the plate had a Q in it".  Color Red + Regex ^.Q.$ --- fuckton results returned

    "It was a red car, I don't know the plate but it was just ones and zeros".  Color Red + Regex: ^[01]*$--- one results returned. "Yeah, that's the jerk."

     



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    I have to wonder if, in this day and age, tracking down these "clever" license plates is easier. Consider:

    "It was a red car, and I think the plate had a Q in it".  Color Red + Regex ^.Q.$ --- fuckton results returned

    "It was a red car, I don't know the plate but it was just ones and zeros".  Color Red + Regex: ^[01]*$--- one results returned. "Yeah, that's the jerk."


    I really doubt that the tools the police have for such things allow for regex matching. Think of the training burden.

    Apropos of licence plates, this morning on my way to work I saw the shortest one I've ever seen: "1P1".



  • @Scarlet Manuka said:

    I really doubt that the tools the police have for such things allow for regex matching. Think of the training burden.

    I believe the tools allow for regex matching, just that it's not presented to the user as a regex - it'll be shown as some fuzzy search (begins with, contains, has the following sequence, etc).



  • @Cassidy said:

    @Scarlet Manuka said:
    I really doubt that the tools the police have for such things allow for regex matching. Think of the training burden.
    I believe the tools allow for regex matching, just that it's not presented to the user as a regex - it'll be shown as some fuzzy search (begins with, contains, has the following sequence, etc).
    Yes, I agree it probably uses regex matching internally, but you're missing my point - that list of options is not likely to include arbitrary regex matching, or anything that can be used to search for the example of "all 0s and 1s".



  • @Scarlet Manuka said:

    but you're missing my point - that list of options is not likely to include arbitrary regex matching, or anything that can be used to search for the example of "all 0s and 1s".

    Erm.. yup, I did miss that point. I blame the beer.

    In my defence, I've taught many programmers for various industries, one lot of which were working on a fuzzy search in just the manner you mentioned - devs said that sometimes a constable will request "the plate started with VJ and had an E or 3 in there. What matches that?" and wanted to know how to implement this as a search mechanism. And yup, they couldn't make it look like a regex.



  • @Cassidy said:

    and had an E or 3 in there
     

    From what I understand, in Ontario, E and 3 are treated as the same character for the purposes of uniqueness. Same with 1, L and I-- Q 0 O, etc.

    I would hope the search routine takes that into account.  SearchTerm = SearchTerm.Replace("/[E3]/", "'[E3]'");


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.