Scorm, or self immolation



  • First post in a while, but consistent reader.

    i've just been tasked with "learning" scorm, whatever that means ... with a view to making some content for an as-yet undecided learning management whatever vendor to host.

    should i kill myself now, or is it not as bad as it first seems?



  • @dysmas said:

    should i kill myself now, or is it not as bad as it first seems?

    If you've really been reading for a while, you know the correct answer is "it's worse".



  • "SCORM tells programmers how to write their code so that it can “play well” with other e-learning software."

    hahaha... poor you.



  • It seems to have originated from the US DoD, to solve a set of problems they had in .... wait for it ..... 1997.

    I've found what looks to be an official JS library, as long as vendors follow the spec (yeah, I know) I might survive.

    edit: as a bonus, Adobe have a product for this market, their videos to promote it (that is a link, doenst look like one in chrome, i blame CS) are quite possibly the worst/best thing i've ever seen. Epic voice man, awful stock photos, and GUITAR, shit yeah!



  • It's SCORM, but the answer depends on the variant. SCORM 1.2 is pure evil, designed by academics and with a fantastic write-only data model for questions and objectives. SCORM 2004 fixed a huge amount, but good luck finding a platform that fully supports it. Plus the years I've endured of having to reduce the technical implementation to the lowest common denominator to get packages working on poorly implemented learning management systems. Good luck!



  • This is pretty much where I'm at ... multiple concurrent versions of a spec that isnt really a spec, but a reference to multiple other specs that sound like they are defined by third party commercial entities.

    I'm just going to hang fire until an LMS vendor is chosen by the powers that be and see what they have to offer, it's that or reach for the gasoline.



  • @dysmas said:

    Adobe have a product for this market, their videos to promote it (that is a link, doenst look like one in chrome, i blame CS) are quite possibly the worst/best thing i've ever seen. Epic voice man, awful stock photos, and GUITAR, shit yeah!

    For UK readers, another bonus is that the 'epic voice man' introduces himself as Doctor Alan Partridge. Luckily, I had already finished my morning oatmeal before I heard/viewed this, or it could have been a VERY messy screen clean-up. And obviously, the video has geeky-looking photos of women with spectacles, one looking uncomfortably like a 20-something Britney Spears lookalike (her spectacles are, naturally, held together with a Band-Aid), the other is in a sharp business suit but still looks like you could shine a torch into one ear and see the beam leave the other ear. Final win is that the 'expert' shown is of course the token 'person of colour' in this epic fail. Can anyone say '1980s?' One of the truly toe-curlingly funniest ninety seconds or so that I've spent for some time!



  • @Cad Delworth said:

    another bonus is that the 'epic voice man' introduces himself as Doctor Alan Partridge.


    I'm a Brit and I missed that, for shame! The whole thing felt like it should be a skit on Mitchell & Webb's sketch show, numberwang etc.



  •  1:14 perfectly epitomizes one's state of being while watching this video:




  • If they just want to use SCORM to facilitate communication with the LMS, you'll be fine.

    If they want to use SCORM sequencing and navigation... kill yourself now.



  • @Cad Delworth said:

    Doctor Alan Partridge

    To be fair, it's spelled "Allen Partridge", according to the blurb underneath the video ;)

    About This Episode Join Dr Allen Partridge, Adobe eLearning evangelist as he takes you through how to create a Soft Skills Training using Adobe Captivate

    But for those who don't know: [url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?gl=NL&v=d0RHAL3-9LU]Alan Partridge[/url]



  • @Gurth said:

    But for those who don't know: Alan Partridge

    Without the laugh track it becomes a bleak, existential drama about a tortured soul trying to survive the modern world.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    Without the laugh track it becomes a bleak, existential drama about a tortured soul trying to survive the modern world.

    The Alan Partridge character began life as the sports reporter in the brilliant comedy radio show On The Hour, which satirised the rolling news channels that were, in those days, new to the UK. ("Poking its fingers in the eyes of news!" and similarly inane straplines delivered by 'gravitas liner guy' appeared throughout the show, which featured numerous fictitious news segments and stories.) The show transferred to TV as The Day Today. The Alan Partridge character then took on a life of his own, hosting his own spoof chat show Knowing Me, Knowing You, Alan again being his toe-curling, self-important, and massively tactless self. Finally, I'm Alan Partridge (the show from which the clip came) covered Alan's career nosedive from TV to early morning local radio, and his increasingly desperate attempts to get back on TV. By this time, the UK audience knew the Alan character well, hence the knowing and genuine laughs from the studio audience (no, it's NOT a laugh track!).



  • @Cad Delworth said:

    By this time, the UK audience knew the Alan character well, hence the knowing and genuine laughs from the studio audience (no, it's NOT a laugh track!).

    Sooooooooo.... not funny. Gotcha.



  • @dysmas said:

    I'm just going to hang fire until an LMS vendor is chosen by the powers that be
     

    I feel your pain.

    One of my clients runs some ancient version of SABA that only supports SCORM 1.2, but since they initially told us the wrong version we started to go down the SCORM 2004 route, only to backtrack. Bleargh!

    It was during this project I found out how woefully inadequate the built-in zipping is on Windows XP on a 1.2GB folder. It was quicker for me to copy the files to a USB stick, boot up my 7 year old laptop, use 7-zip, and copy back.

     


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @Cad Delworth said:
    By this time, the UK audience knew the Alan character well, hence the knowing and genuine laughs from the studio audience (no, it's NOT a laugh track!).

    Sooooooooo.... not funny. Gotcha.

    I never found Alan Partridge funny. Excruciating, yes; funny, no.



  • It's supposed to be more satire than comedy (isn't it?).

    Like "The Office", where part of you is laughing at the banalities of life exposed.. and part of you is cringing inward because you know someone like that (or have done the same yourself).


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