How many milisseconds in a second again?



  • It doesn't matter whether you use use imperial or metric units, seconds are always divided in decimal fractions, am I right? Across every culture and in every part of the world, right? Do powers of ten look difficult in anyway to grasp?

    Yet W3Schools feels like they need to remind you about it, as if it were not a given. Here and here.

    Tip: 1000 ms = 1 second.
    Note: There are 1000 milliseconds in one second.

    I had a boss who every now and then said that if you just memorized everything they have at W3S, you already had all you needed to have an awesome job and that for the sake of your career you could skip high school and college altogether if you had that. I wonder how he's doing nowadays, career-wise.



  • Well, you might think that it's 1024 ms/s, seeing as it's on a computer...

    Or you could be an extremely culturally-isolated American, and never quite got the hang of the metric system... what's that, megaseconds? So there are 1,000,000 seconds in a megasecond, right? ūüôā



  • It could be given in nanofortnights. (about 1.2 milliseconds)

    @ekolis said:

    culturally-isolated American, and never quite got the hang of the metric system

    TRWTF is dollars and cents, then.



  • ¬†I think the rule is, never underestimate the stupidity and cultural isolation of people who think that they are very clever.

    That's why they do it.



  • @Zemm said:

    TRWTF is dollars and cents, then.

     

    That bit I understand (as well as "quarter"), but it's the "nickel" and "dime" bit that threw me. What's the reasoning behind this?

    (yes, I know in the UK we had "shilling", "farthing", "florin", "crown" etc)



  • ¬†milisseconds?



  • @Cassidy said:

    @Zemm said:

    TRWTF is dollars and cents, then.

     

    That bit I understand (as well as "quarter"), but it's the "nickel" and "dime" bit that threw me. What's the reasoning behind this?

    (yes, I know in the UK we had "shilling", "farthing", "florin", "crown" etc)

    The weekee says "The term dime comes from old French "disme",[1] meaning "tithe" or "tenth part", from the Latin decima [pars]",

    and

    "Applying the term "nickel" to a coin precedes the usage of five-cent pieces made from nickel alloy. The term was originally applied to the 1857‚Äď1858 Flying Eagle cent and the Indian Head cent coin from 1859 to 1864, which were composed of 12% nickel, 88% copper. Throughout the Civil War these cents were referred to as "nickels" or "nicks" from their metal content." And now you know.



  • ¬†http://xkcd.com/1000/

    I apologize for xkcd reference, but it does seem quite relevant.



  • @ekolis said:

    ...Or you could be an extremely culturally-isolated American, and never quite got the hang of the metric system...

    That's okay, ekolis, we now have Barfy bin Hussein Obama who is quickly bringing us down to your level. Soon the Chinese will have to take over as world policeman because we're abolishing our military and our industrial base.



  • @Pim said:

     milisseconds?

     

    It's just like a millisecond, but pronounced by Marylin Monroe.

     

     


  • ‚ôŅ

    @ekolis said:

    ...and never quite got the hang of drank the metric system Kool-Aid...

    FTFY



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    @Pim said:
    milisseconds?
    It's just like a millisecond, but pronounced by Marylin Monroe.

    Topical.



  • Why do we all have to¬†agree that base 10 is the best arbitrary number base? What's wrong with 20?¬† Aren't all digits created equally?¬† Are fingers inherently better than toes?



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Lorne Kates said:
    @Pim said:
    milisseconds?
    It's just like a millisecond, but pronounced by Marylin Monroe.
    Topical.

    Oinkment.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    I think they didn't want you to get them confused with microseconds or nanoseconds or picoseconds or what have you.

    I'm convinced the target audience of W3Schools is third graders.



  • Every base is base 10*.

    * As written in it's own base.



  • @MiffTheFox said:

    Every base is base 10*.

    * And they are belong to us.



  • I once ported a system from SCO Unix to Linux. Because timing was important, and an old version of SCO Unix had had a bug in time functions, the system had extra paranoid code to check the time-of-day.

    This code triggered on the Linux machine.

    Investigation showed that Linux has 1,001 ms per second... the "number of milliseconds in the current second of the time" could be anywhere from 0 to 1000.



  • Topic reminds me of my favorite measurment:

    millihelen: That quantity of beauty which is both necessary and sufficient to launch a single ship.



  • @AlanWms said:

    Topic reminds me of my favorite measurment:

    millihelen: That quantity of beauty which is both necessary and sufficient to launch a single ship.

    I don't get it.

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