Bananas for breakfast



  • are better than having coffee.

    Banana is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C, Potassium and Manganese, and a very good source of Vitamin B6.

    That will be all.



  • @Nagesh said:

    Filed under: Eat more fruits.
    That's funny, I always thought fruits eat bananas.



  • @frits said:

    @Nagesh said:

    Filed under: Eat more fruits.
    That's funny, I always thought fruits eat bananas.

    Do you like or not like banana?



  • @Nagesh said:

    @frits said:

    @Nagesh said:

    Filed under: Eat more fruits.
    That's funny, I always thought fruits eat bananas.

    Do you like or not like banana?
    I'm partial to the black ones. ;)  They're sweet!



  • @frits said:

    @Nagesh said:

    @frits said:

    @Nagesh said:

    Filed under: Eat more fruits.
    That's funny, I always thought fruits eat bananas.

    Do you like or not like banana?
    I'm partial to the black ones. ;)  They're sweet!

    Nendrapalam?

    [img]http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_sulZuhXRlx4/RpbXZi-EqyI/AAAAAAAAAIQ/k_SkOh4gx-0/s320/Food3+014.jpg[/img]



  •  Man, warm fruit is like a sin against nature.I still think people who like that crap have a psychiatric affliction.

     Fruit should be fresh, damnit.



  • Warm rhubarb or tart cherry pie with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

     



  • @dhromed said:

     Man, warm fruit is like a sin against nature.I still think people who like that crap have a psychiatric affliction.

     Fruit should be fresh, damnit.

    [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_strudel[/url] is delicious when just out of the oven



  • @dhromed said:

     Man, warm fruit is like a sin against nature.I still think people who like that crap have a psychiatric affliction.

     Fruit should be fresh, damnit.

    If you have Nendrapalam once, you will want it again and again. It is total delishios!



  •  Aren't bananas technically berries?



  • @dhromed said:

     Man, warm fruit is like a sin against nature.I still think people who like that crap have a psychiatric affliction.

     Fruit should be fresh, damnit.

     

    "Fresh" does not imply "cool".  Bananas, being tropical, may well be warm right off the tree.

    BTW, humans tend to eat bananas by snapping the stem sideways.  Other primates tend to open them from the other end.  Surely apes and monkeys should be considered the experts in this subject, and it behooves us to emulate their best practices.

     



  • @too_many_usernames said:

     Aren't bananas technically berries?

    Seeds actually. The banana plant is a grass. You're thinking of tomatoes.



  • @da Doctah said:

    BTW, humans tend to eat bananas by snapping the stem sideways.  Other primates tend to open them from the other end.  Surely apes and monkeys should be considered the experts in this subject, and it behooves us to emulate their best practices.
     

    This is just another example of competing standards.



  • @LurkNoMore said:

    @too_many_usernames said:

     Aren't bananas technically berries?

    Seeds actually. The banana plant is a grass. You're thinking of tomatoes.

    Little known fact: Bananas are not plants at all.  They're actually a lichen.



  • @too_many_usernames said:

     Aren't bananas technically berries?

    Banana is have good binding property. maybe we should create binding class banana in ORM.

    OR

    Create Banana ORM and market it!



  • Bananas are finally back to a normal price around here (less than $2/kg), after a year of them being over $10/kg. A certain cyclone wiped out the entire crop.

    I actually had a banana for breakfast this morning!

    No chocolate.



  • @Zemm said:

    Bananas are finally back to a normal price around here (less than $2/kg), after a year of them being over $10/kg. A certain cyclone wiped out the entire crop.

    I actually had a banana for breakfast this morning!

    No chocolate.

    Sometime if I am in hurry, I will eat two bananas and not anything else for breakfast.



  • @Nagesh said:

    Sometime if I am in hurry, I will eat two bananas and not anything else for breakfast.

    What if you're really hungry?  Three bananas?



  • @boog said:

    @Nagesh said:

    Sometime if I am in hurry, I will eat two bananas and not anything else for breakfast.

    What if you're really hungry?  Three bananas?

     One day I eat 6 banana and then get stomach ache. So my Ubound limit is no more then 5 at one time.



  • @Nagesh said:

    @boog said:
    @Nagesh said:
    Sometime if I am in hurry, I will eat two bananas and not anything else for breakfast.

    What if you're really hungry? Three bananas?

    One day I eat 6 banana and then get stomach ache. So my Ubound limit is no more then 5 at one time.
    Potassium poisoning, no doubt.



  •  Yes bananas are really good for breakfast nice information...

     [url=http://www.sandfordhighschool.com]High School Diploma[/url]



  • @PJH said:

    @Nagesh said:
    @boog said:
    @Nagesh said:
    Sometime if I am in hurry, I will eat two bananas and not anything else for breakfast.

    What if you're really hungry? Three bananas?

    One day I eat 6 banana and then get stomach ache. So my Ubound limit is no more then 5 at one time.
    Potassium poisoning, no doubt.

    i doubtful if such thing exists. Potasium and cynanide are two different things.



  • @Nagesh said:

    @PJH said:

    @Nagesh said:
    @boog said:
    @Nagesh said:
    Sometime if I am in hurry, I will eat two bananas and not anything else for breakfast.

    What if you're really hungry? Three bananas?

    One day I eat 6 banana and then get stomach ache. So my Ubound limit is no more then 5 at one time.
    Potassium poisoning, no doubt.

    i doubtful if such thing exists. Potasium and cynanide are two different things.

     

    Potassium poisoning is a very real thing.  It's called "hyperkalemia".  My mother was once prescribed a strong diuretic, along with a potassium supplement to stave off the inevitable deficiency when the diuretic flushed all the electrolytes out of her system.  Unfortunately, it took a while before the diuretic had its desired effect, with the result that she built up a dangerously high level of potassium from the supplement until the other drug finally kicked in.

    They also use potassium chloride as the third part of the "lethal injection" for execution; the first two parts cause unconsciousness and paralysis, while the KCl actually stops the heart.

    In a dietary context, you can OD on potassium by stuffing yourself with bananas, or you can go for something a little stronger and pig out on durian which has something like 400 times the concentration of the stuff.

     



  • I thing it is very good for health



  • @da Doctah said:

    Potassium poisoning is a very real thing.  It's called "hyperkalemia".  My mother was once prescribed a strong diuretic, along with a potassium supplement to stave off the inevitable deficiency when the diuretic flushed all the electrolytes out of her system.  Unfortunately, it took a while before the diuretic had its desired effect, with the result that she built up a dangerously high level of potassium from the supplement until the other drug finally kicked in.

    They also use potassium chloride as the third part of the "lethal injection" for execution; the first two parts cause unconsciousness and paralysis, while the KCl actually stops the heart.

    In a dietary context, you can OD on potassium by stuffing yourself with bananas, or you can go for something a little stronger and pig out on durian which has something like 400 times the concentration of the stuff.

     

     

    I used to be an EMT and knew exactly how this worked . . . let's see how badly I can mangle this . . .

    Cells require both sodium and potassium to work correctly.  The context in which I remember it is that in the process of a neuron firing, the sodium and potassium exchange places, with the potassium leaving the intracellular space and entering the extracellular space.  The pump then causes a reuptake of potassium into the intracellular space.  There is a time called a refractory period in which the neuron can't fire again until the sodium and potassium are returned to their rightful locations.

    In a situation where there is too much potassium and not enough sodium (like when injected with potassium chloride), there is no longer any room for sodium.  You end up with potassium in both the intracellular and extracellular space.  There is no potential created across the intracellular/extracellular space and the nerve can no longer fire.  The nerve can't fire, it can't stimulate the heart muscle, the heart muscle stands still, may God have mercy on your soul.

    What exactly the lethal dose is, I don't recall.  I just remember that a significantly elevated T wave on an EKG (the normally small bump that follows the big spike you see [called the QRS complex]) that returned to baseline was an indication of hyperkalemia (as previously mentioned, too much potassium).  A T wave that doesn't return to baseline, well . . . that was bad too.

     



  • @nonpartisan said:


    I used to be an EMT and knew exactly how this worked . . . let's see how badly I can mangle this . . .

     

    Based on a quick skim, not mangled at all, except that myocardium
    doesn't really have "nerves" as such, but rather the muscle cells
    themselves conduct the "wave" of depolarization.  For skeletal muscles,
    it is in fact the nerves that are hosed, for the same reasons. 

    "Bad news" is thought to be K above 7.0 mEq/L, with normal usually between 3.5 and 5.  There are also some (less common) conditions where, instead of extra potassium coming into the body or not enough going out (impaired excretion), extra potassium gets "leaked" into the blood stream, e.g., by hemolysis (cells popping when they aren't supposed to).

    Of course bananas don't actually have all that much potassium in them.  Roughly 1 mEq per inch.  Tree nuts, figs, dates all have more.

     



  • @DrBen said:

    Based on a quick skim, not mangled at all, except that myocardium
    doesn't really have "nerves" as such, but rather the muscle cells
    themselves conduct the "wave" of depolarization.  For skeletal muscles,
    it is in fact the nerves that are hosed, for the same reasons. 

    "Bad news" is thought to be K above 7.0 mEq/L, with normal usually between 3.5 and 5.  There are also some (less common) conditions where, instead of extra potassium coming into the body or not enough going out (impaired excretion), extra potassium gets "leaked" into the blood stream, e.g., by hemolysis (cells popping when they aren't supposed to).

    Of course bananas don't actually have all that much potassium in them.  Roughly 1 mEq per inch.  Tree nuts, figs, dates all have more.

     

    Yeah, thanks for the confirmation.  I thought it sounded mostly right, but I kept remembering the absolute refractory period vs the relative refractory period after a depolarization and how that can cause VT or VF if a depolarization occurs during the relative refractory period.  I knew there was more to it than just the nerves, but couldn't reconcile the whole story.  After high school, even though I'd been into computers and programming since I was 9, I didn't think I wanted to do IT as a career.  I wanted to help people but didn't have the confidence to become an MD, so I tried my hand as an EMT and paramedic.  I got my EMT basic and IV skills certs (EMT 1 and 2 in Oregon at the time).  I entered a paramedic program and did really well in the classroom and hospital rotations, but when I started my internship I froze . . . pretty much literally.  The reality of a human life being in my hands, even with fellow paramedics around me, was just too much.  I couldn't get past it -- the possibility of making the wrong decision and someone losing their life or being permanently disabled as a result of my incorrect choice.  I was much more comfortable in the dispatch center, so I did that for several years.  My EMT and dispatch experience landed me a position with a local hospital in their ED communications center.  One thing led to another, I started doing database development and computer teching for them after my manager saw my computer skills.  I developed a database and application to manage region-wide bed status in the event of an MCI or disaster.  In 2006, I joined up with the network engineering team and never looked back.  (Not entirely true -- I still have a great working relationship with my former manager.)  I can handle screwing up on a router in a moment of crisis because I can wipe the config and reboot in a worst case scenario, and gee, the network comes back up after that!

    But I used to have fun breaking down ECG strips and determining the rhythm.  That's one thing I miss.  Running scenarios for ACLS was fun too.  I carry a fair amount of the concepts I learned in paramedic school with me to this day, and I am grateful for it even though I didn't make it a career.

    Back to what you said though . . . for anyone reading, it's important to understand that first value, 7.0 mEq/L, is just that -- per liter, not an absolute number.  Using the figure you said of 1 mEq/in for a banana, and still having to go through the digestive process . . . the chances are remote indeed that you're going to cause a potassium OD just by eating bananas.  So go ahead and enjoy!  (Unless your doctor says otherwise . . .)

     



  • @nonpartisan said:

    But I used to have fun breaking down ECG strips and determining the rhythm.  That's one thing I miss.  Running scenarios for ACLS was fun too.  I carry a fair amount of the concepts I learned in paramedic school with me to this day, and I am grateful for it even though I didn't make it a career.

    Back to what you said though . . . for anyone reading, it's important to understand that first value, 7.0 mEq/L, is just that -- per liter, not an absolute number.  Using the figure you said of 1 mEq/in for a banana, and still having to go through the digestive process . . . the chances are remote indeed that you're going to cause a potassium OD just by eating bananas.  So go ahead and enjoy!  (Unless your doctor says otherwise . . .)

     

     

    So you're not actively EMTing now? Too bad, we need more good EMTs. 

    And yeah, you could eat nothing but bananas constantly and wouldn't be able to actually get hyperkalemic.  The father of a family friend was stuck in the jungle with no supply waiting for a boat home from the Philippines at the end of WWII, and he and his buddies had nothing to eat but bananas for something like two weeks.  They did all get diarrhea, but other than that they were fine.

     

     



  • @nonpartisan said:

    I can handle screwing up on a router in a moment of crisis because I can wipe the config and reboot in a worst case scenario, and gee, the network comes back up after that!
     

    If only humans could be wiped and rebooted.

    Though technically, you can stop someone's heart, kill brain activity, then zap 'em and they spring back to life. But it's not quite as, er, deterministic, as a router config.



  • @DrBen said:

    The father of a family friend was stuck in the jungle with no supply waiting for a boat home from the Philippines at the end of WWII, and he and his buddies had nothing to eat but bananas for something like two weeks.  They did all get diarrhea, but other than that they were fine.
     

    daDoctah's Digestive Rule of TRWTF Threads:  Eventually, all conversations end up being about shit.



  • @dhromed said:

    If only humans could be wiped and rebooted.

    Though technically, you can stop someone's heart, kill brain activity, then zap 'em and they spring back to life. But it's not quite as, er, deterministic, as a router config.

     

    Well, that's sort of what electroconvulsive therapy is, minus the cardiac arrest.  Anesthetize, induce seizure, and then wait for him/her to wake up.  Bam, great treatment for refractory depression.

     

     



  • @DrBen said:

    So you're not actively EMTing now? Too bad, we need more good EMTs. 

    And yeah, you could eat nothing but bananas constantly and wouldn't be able to actually get hyperkalemic.  The father of a family friend was stuck in the jungle with no supply waiting for a boat home from the Philippines at the end of WWII, and he and his buddies had nothing to eat but bananas for something like two weeks.  They did all get diarrhea, but other than that they were fine.

     I'm pretty sure that if you're healthy (no kidney problems), your kidneys will deal with the excess potassium. If you are unwell (say, massively dehydrated, or some other renal issue), your kidneys may not excrete the extra potassium, causing the hyperkalemia.


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