Is that a sex toy on the new Canadian $100 Bill?



  • The Bank of Canada plans to start circulating its new $100 polymer
    bills
    on Nov. 14, the first phase of the country's transition into
    plastic money.   New $50 bills will begin
    circulating next March.  All remaining denominations will be released by the end of 2013.

    Aside from new security features, the bills are also expected to get a makeover.   Pictures that feature key moments in Canadian history are intended to
    transform the bills into what Finance Minister Jim Flaherty has called
    "cultural touchstones that reflect and celebrate our Canadian
    experience".  Images on the $100 bills pay homage to key Canadian innovations
    including the discovery of insulin and the invention of the pacemaker.  On its $50 successor, images of the Canadian Coast Guard ship Amundsen will be featured.

    However, it seems people in focus groups who were asked to look at the new bills were a little confused by what they saw.

    Internal documents show the Bank of Canada fretted that Canadians would
    find all kinds of unintended images on the new bills. So the bank used
    focus groups to spot "potential controversies."  The new $100s feature two portraits of prime minister Robert Borden.  On the other side of the bill, there's an image of a researcher at a
    microscope and a depiction of the double-helix structure of DNA.

    But the DNA strand evoked something else.   A Vancouver focus group thought it was "a sex toy (i.e., sex beads)."  Others thought it was the Big Dipper.


     



     



  •  :|



  •  If you think about it a bit, DNA is a sex toy.



  • Those naughty cells!



  • @Article said:

    But focus groups called the bills "Monopoly money" and said they did not feel as real as paper money.

    LOL. Paper banknotes feel like monopoly money to me. Since, you know, monopoly money is paper. Here in Australia we've had the full complement of polymer notes since 1996 - my entire adult life. During a trip to Japan we got a bunch of ¥10000 notes and they felt like monopoly money, despite being worth around $160 each at the time!



  • @Zemm said:

    @Article said:
    But focus groups called the bills "Monopoly money" and said they did not feel as real as paper money.

    LOL. Paper banknotes feel like monopoly money to me. Since, you know, monopoly money is paper. Here in Australia we've had the full complement of polymer notes since 1996 - my entire adult life. During a trip to Japan we got a bunch of ¥10000 notes and they felt like monopoly money, despite being worth around $160 each at the time!

    Old Turkish Lira was the best monopoly currency I experienced - paper notes and millions to the GB pound in 2001. I think that a McDonalds meal at the airport cost 48 million lira which felt like a scary amount to put on the credit card.


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