SuperGrandGrandParentNodeName



  • This code is used to traverse an XML map to convert a hashtable into data to be exported to a CSV file.

     Why any of this is necessary, I have no idea; I just though you guys might appreciate the variable names in this function

     

             Private Sub ParseChildNode(ByVal xmlDataNode As XmlNode, ByVal parentNodeName As String, ByVal grandParentNodeName As String, ByVal grandGrandParentNodeName As String, ByVal superGrandGrandParentNodeName As String, ByVal parentSix As String, ByVal parentSeven As String)
                Dim childNode As XmlNode
                Dim childIndex As Int32
                Dim columnNo As Int32
                Dim subChildIndex As Int32
                Dim noOfChildNodex As Int32 = xmlDataNode.ChildNodes.Count

                If (Not xmlDataNode.Attributes Is Nothing) Then
                    If (Not xmlDataNode.Attributes.ItemOf("column") Is Nothing) Then
                        columnNo = Convert.ToInt32(xmlDataNode.Attributes.ItemOf("column").Value)

                        If (xmlDataNode.Name = "attribute") Then
                            If (inputHashtable.Contains(parentSeven + "." + parentSix + "." + superGrandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandParentNodeName + "." + parentNodeName + "." + xmlDataNode.Attributes.ItemOf("name").Value)) Then
                                listData.Insert(columnNo - 1, inputHashtable.Item(parentSeven + "." + parentSix + "." + superGrandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandParentNodeName + "." + parentNodeName + "." + xmlDataNode.Attributes.ItemOf("name").Value))
                            Else
                                'Enter null value
                                listData.Insert(columnNo - 1, "")
                            End If
                        Else
                            If (inputHashtable.Contains(parentSeven + "." + parentSix + "." + superGrandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandParentNodeName + "." + parentNodeName + "." + xmlDataNode.Name)) Then
                                listData.Insert(columnNo - 1, inputHashtable.Item(parentSeven + "." + parentSix + "." + superGrandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandParentNodeName + "." + parentNodeName + "." + xmlDataNode.Name))
                            Else
                                'Enter null value
                                listData.Insert(columnNo - 1, "")
                            End If
                        End If

                    End If
                End If

                parentSeven = parentSix
                parentSix = superGrandGrandParentNodeName
                superGrandGrandParentNodeName = grandGrandParentNodeName
                grandGrandParentNodeName = grandParentNodeName
                grandParentNodeName = parentNodeName

                For childIndex = 0 To noOfChildNodex - 1
                    childNode = xmlDataNode.ChildNodes.Item(childIndex)

                    parentNodeName = xmlDataNode.Name

                    If (Not childNode.Attributes.ItemOf("column") Is Nothing) Then
                        columnNo = Convert.ToInt32(childNode.Attributes.ItemOf("column").Value)

                        If (childNode.Name = "attribute") Then
                            If (inputHashtable.Contains(parentSeven + "." + parentSix + "." + superGrandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandParentNodeName + "." + parentNodeName + "." + childNode.Attributes.ItemOf("name").Value)) Then
                                listData.Insert(columnNo - 1, inputHashtable.Item(parentSeven + "." + parentSix + "." + superGrandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandParentNodeName + "." + parentNodeName + "." + childNode.Attributes.ItemOf("name").Value))
                            Else
                                'Enter null value
                                listData.Insert(columnNo - 1, "")
                            End If
                        Else
                            If (inputHashtable.Contains(parentSeven + "." + parentSix + "." + superGrandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandParentNodeName + "." + parentNodeName + "." + childNode.Name)) Then
                                listData.Insert(columnNo - 1, inputHashtable.Item(parentSeven + "." + parentSix + "." + superGrandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandGrandParentNodeName + "." + grandParentNodeName + "." + parentNodeName + "." + childNode.Name))
                            Else
                                'Enter null value
                                listData.Insert(columnNo - 1, "")
                            End If
                        End If
                    End If

                    If (childNode.HasChildNodes) Then
                        For subChildIndex = 0 To childNode.ChildNodes.Count - 1
                            If (parentNodeName = "#document") Then
                                ParseChildNode(childNode.ChildNodes.Item(subChildIndex), childNode.Name, "", "", "", "", "")
                            Else
                                ParseChildNode(childNode.ChildNodes.Item(subChildIndex), childNode.Name, parentNodeName, grandParentNodeName, grandGrandParentNodeName, superGrandGrandParentNodeName, parentSix)
                            End If
                        Next
                    End If

                Next childIndex

            End Sub



  • Wow.  What's a grandgrandparent?  Does each grand skip a generation?  Is a grandgrandparent a great-grandparent's parent?



  • TRWTF is that the parent of a grandparent isn't a grand-grandparent, it's a great grandparent.  Does this coder know nothing?!




  • Dim grandGrandGrandma As Gertrude

    Dim grandFairyGodMother As Gwen

    Dim greatHonkinGrandLordParent As Godwin

    Dim greatAuntGrandUnclePerson As Grant




    This isn't a joke. I just copied this from the OP.



  • @superjer said:

    Dim grandGrandGrandma As Gertrude

    Dim grandFairyGodMother As Gwen

    Dim greatHonkinGrandLordParent As Godwin

    Dim greatAuntGrandUnclePerson As Grant


    Dim Westley as DreadPirateRoberts

     



  • @DaveK said:

    @superjer said:

    Dim grandGrandGrandma As Gertrude

    Dim grandFairyGodMother As Gwen

    Dim greatHonkinGrandLordParent As Godwin

    Dim greatAuntGrandUnclePerson As Grant


    Dim Westley as DreadPirateRoberts

     

    You obviously weren't paying attention to the movie.

    Class Westley
      Inherits Person
      Implements IDreadPirateRoberts
    
    End Class


  • @Jaime said:

    @DaveK said:

    @superjer said:

    Dim grandGrandGrandma As Gertrude

    Dim grandFairyGodMother As Gwen

    Dim greatHonkinGrandLordParent As Godwin

    Dim greatAuntGrandUnclePerson As Grant


    Dim Westley as DreadPirateRoberts

     

    You obviously weren't paying attention to the movie.

    Class Westley
      Inherits Person
      Implements IDreadPirateRoberts
    
    End Class

    I don't recall ever claiming that DreadPirateRoberts was a singleton...

     



  • Variable names like that are a huge time-waster in my experience. To have to use the Shift key 4 or more times just to type the name of a local variable or a parameter is absolutely awful. I can see - maybe - where a C/C++ function prototype might use some pretty verbose formal parameter names, but even in these cases the implementation of the function ought to use short, lowercase-only names. This sort of renaming in the implementation is allowed. I'm not sure exactly how this works in C#, VB.NET, Pascal for Toddlers, etc., but regardless of the specifics of a development tool, its users ought to find a way to avoid using Shift when typing identifiers. To have to do this completely interrupts my typing process, and my thought process.



    I don't have many rules where I work, but the first two are:


    1. Don't make me use the Shift key unnecessarily (i.e. no "cute" identifiers).


    2. Any design decision that breaks the designer, the debugger, "Go to Definition", or "Find All References" is incorrect.



      What's ironic is that I occasionally get objections to both of these rules on grounds of maintainability. As the main maintenance programmer, I can assure you that the things that slow me down more than anything are 1) when I have to type / think in terms of logorrheic, finger-twisting identifier names and 2) when I try to apply the IDE's "power tools" to a problem and find that they've been broken by some object-oriented mumbo-jumbo.


  • @bridget99 said:

    Any design decision that breaks ... "Go to Definition", or "Find All References" is incorrect.
     

    Out of curiosity, what does that?



  • @bridget99 said:

    ...but regardless of the specifics of a development tool, its users ought to find a way to avoid using Shift when typing identifiers. To have to do this completely interrupts my typing process, and my thought process.

    This sounds like a personal problem to me.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    @bridget99 said:

    Any design decision that breaks ... "Go to Definition", or "Find All References" is incorrect.
     

    Out of curiosity, what does that?

    If the call upon which I am right-clicking is made using a reference to a base class, then choosing "Go to Definition" takes me to a stupid little base class stub declaration instead of to the actual implementation. That was the basic species of problem to which I was referring.

     



  • @boomzilla said:

    @bridget99 said:
    ...but regardless of the specifics of a development tool, its users ought to find a way to avoid using Shift when typing identifiers. To have to do this completely interrupts my typing process, and my thought process.
    This sounds like a personal problem to me.

    Oh... I was not aware that others were capable of typing in multiple-key combinations as easily as single-key combinations. In my universe 2>1, and hitting 2 keys is more difficult, more time consuming, and more error-prone than hitting 1 key.

    Since the universe in which you are living does not seem to conform to the basic laws of economics, could you maybe do me a few favors? First, say "hi" to the designers of Microsoft Excel, who (believing time to be infinite, in particular my own time) apparently live in the same universe as you. Then, I have some change requests involving Notepad++ that you should have no problem implementing for me, since time is apparently free where you live.



  • @bridget99 said:

    hitting 2 keys is more difficult, more time consuming, and more error-prone than hitting 1 key.

    Let's talk about economy, here. Just how much more difficult is it to press 2 keys if you are capable of pressing 1? Let's begin the analysis using qualifier terms. Is it A) much more difficult, B) a little difficult, C) about the same, D) not very difficult, or E) not difficult at all? And apparently you're weighing that against the time it takes a human to either 1) parse and lex a CompoundVariableName or 2) figure out abrvarnms, is that right? Let's apply the same A-E scale to the two examples just given.

    Are you sure your weights are set correctly..?



  • @bridget99 said:

    @boomzilla said:
    @bridget99 said:
    ...but regardless of the specifics of a development tool, its users ought to find a way to avoid using Shift when typing identifiers. To have to do this completely interrupts my typing process, and my thought process.

    This sounds like a personal problem to me.

    Oh... I was not aware that others were capable of typing in multiple-key combinations as easily as single-key combinations. In my universe 2>1, and hitting 2 keys is more difficult, more time consuming, and more error-prone than hitting 1 key.

    Since the universe in which you are living does not seem to conform to the basic laws of economics, could you maybe do me a few favors? First, say "hi" to the designers of Microsoft Excel, who (believing time to be infinite, in particular my own time) apparently live in the same universe as you. Then, I have some change requests involving Notepad++ that you should have no problem implementing for me, since time is apparently free where you live.

    OK, IHBT, etc, etc, but....bullshit. There is a difference between certain key combinations being more difficult and your train of thought being derailed. Does the letter 'p' confuse your wittle fingers, too?



  • @boomzilla said:

    OK, IHBT, etc, etc, but....bullshit. There is a difference between certain key combinations being more difficult and your train of thought being derailed. Does the letter 'p' confuse your wittle fingers, too?

    Reminds me of the guy who said he used the ? operator in C++/C#/etc because it's so much faster than typing the equivalent if().



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @boomzilla said:
    OK, IHBT, etc, etc, but....bullshit. There is a difference between certain key combinations being more difficult and your train of thought being derailed. Does the letter 'p' confuse your wittle fingers, too?

    Reminds me of the guy who said he used the ? operator in C++/C#/etc because it's so much faster than typing the equivalent if().

    Oh, well, that's totally different. That dude gets to avoid typing out all of the spaces to make sure is code is indented properly. Just think of how much money you'd save from having to replace keyboards with worn out space bars!



  • @boomzilla said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    Reminds me of the guy who said he used the ? operator in C++/C#/etc because it's so much faster than typing the equivalent if().

    Oh, well, that's totally different. That dude gets to avoid typing out all of the spaces to make sure is code is indented properly. Just think of how much money you'd save from having to replace keyboards with worn out space bars!

    I do hope you're being facetious. If not, TRWTF is having to hit the Space bar multiple times (or at all) to indent code properly.



  • @heterodox said:

    @boomzilla said:
    Oh, well, that's totally different. That dude gets to avoid typing out all of the spaces to make sure is code is indented properly. Just think of how much money you'd save from having to replace keyboards with worn out space bars!

    I do hope you're being facetious. If not, TRWTF is having to hit the Space bar multiple times (or at all) to indent code properly.

    OK, smartypants. How do you indent code?



  • @boomzilla said:

    @heterodox said:
    @boomzilla said:
    Oh, well, that's totally different. That dude gets to avoid typing out all of the spaces to make sure is code is indented properly. Just think of how much money you'd save from having to replace keyboards with worn out space bars!
    I do hope you're being facetious. If not, TRWTF is having to hit the Space bar multiple times (or at all) to indent code properly.
    OK, smartypants. How do you indent code?
    He stares it down until it indents itself...



  • @C-Octothorpe said:

    @boomzilla said:
    @heterodox Chuck Norris said:
    @boomzilla said:
    Oh, well, that's totally different. That dude gets to avoid typing out all of the spaces to make sure is code is indented properly. Just think of how much money you'd save from having to replace keyboards with worn out space bars!
    I do hope you're being facetious. If not, TRWTF is having to hit the Space bar multiple times (or at all) to indent code properly.
    OK, smartypants. How do you indent code?
    He stares it down until it indents itself...

    CNTFY



  • @boomzilla said:

    @bridget99 said:
    @boomzilla said:
    @bridget99 said:
    ...but regardless of the specifics of a development tool, its users ought to find a way to avoid using Shift when typing identifiers. To have to do this completely interrupts my typing process, and my thought process.
    This sounds like a personal problem to me.

    Oh... I was not aware that others were capable of typing in multiple-key combinations as easily as single-key combinations. In my universe 2>1, and hitting 2 keys is more difficult, more time consuming, and more error-prone than hitting 1 key.

    Since the universe in which you are living does not seem to conform to the basic laws of economics, could you maybe do me a few favors? First, say "hi" to the designers of Microsoft Excel, who (believing time to be infinite, in particular my own time) apparently live in the same universe as you. Then, I have some change requests involving Notepad++ that you should have no problem implementing for me, since time is apparently free where you live.

    OK, IHBT, etc, etc, but....bullshit. There is a difference between certain key combinations being more difficult and your train of thought being derailed. Does the letter 'p' confuse your wittle fingers, too?

    All I can tell you is that my opinion is based on my professional and academic experience. I get more value from the time saved by being able to type, say, "ii" than I get value from seeing "meaningful" identifier names like "nIterativeLoopCounter." I also don't have to expend my time looking for the "perfect" variable name, as I have seen other progammers do.

    I get the sense that a hypothetical "typical programmer" would disagree with me, but this doesn't necessarily imply that I am wrong. In my experience, I outperform most other programmers. My employer could surely have a "typical programmer off the street" if they wanted him, but believe it or not they prefer me. And i would gladly put my track record up against anyone else's (except that there's no way I'm exposing my real identity on this site, in light of the vitriol I've been subjected to here).

    Incidentally, all of those supposedly meaningful identifier names really just coalesce into a homogeneous blur in my experience. At least "ii" and "jj" look different... "nIterativeLoopCounter", "nGrandpaPointer", "nSuperGrandpaPointer", etc. all look the same to me; they all just look like snakes in the process of digesting several large meals. All I see is "snake #1", "snake #2", etc., and I know there are other people that experience this as well. I understand that people like to convince themselves that these identifiers are "more professional", whatever that means, but I am simply telling you that they do absolutely nothing for me as a programmer.



  • @bridget99 said:

    All I can tell you is that my opinion is based on my professional and academic experience. I get more value from the time saved by being able to type, say, "ii" than I get value from seeing "meaningful" identifier names like "nIterativeLoopCounter." I also don't have to expend my time looking for the "perfect" variable name, as I have seen other progammers do.

    I get the sense that a hypothetical "typical programmer" would disagree with me, but this doesn't necessarily imply that I am wrong. In my experience, I outperform most other programmers. My employer could surely have a "typical programmer off the street" if they wanted him, but believe it or not they prefer me. And i would gladly put my track record up against anyone else's (except that there's no way I'm exposing my real identity on this site, in light of the vitriol I've been subjected to here).

    Incidentally, all of those supposedly meaningful identifier names really just coalesce into a homogeneous blur in my experience. At least "ii" and "jj" look different... "nIterativeLoopCounter", "nGrandpaPointer", "nSuperGrandpaPointer", etc. all look the same to me; they all just look like snakes in the process of digesting several large meals. All I see is "snake #1", "snake #2", etc., and I know there are other people that experience this as well. I understand that people like to convince themselves that these identifiers are "more professional", whatever that means, but I am simply telling you that they do absolutely nothing for me as a programmer.

    OK, so what you meant to say was that overly verbose names are overly verbose. I agree with you here, and wish that I could purge camel case from the world. But instead you originally said that you were a shitty typist.



  • @Xyro said:

    @bridget99 said:
    hitting 2 keys is more difficult, more time consuming, and more error-prone than hitting 1 key.

    Let's talk about economy, here. Just how much more difficult is it to press 2 keys if you are capable of pressing 1? Let's begin the analysis using qualifier terms. Is it A) much more difficult, B) a little difficult, C) about the same, D) not very difficult, or E) not difficult at all? And apparently you're weighing that against the time it takes a human to either 1) parse and lex a CompoundVariableName or 2) figure out abrvarnms, is that right? Let's apply the same A-E scale to the two examples just given.

    Are you sure your weights are set correctly..?

    No, I am not sure I am setting my weights correctly; in fact, the "weights" you speak of probably vary from programmer to programmer (in both their perception and in reality).



    However, I can tell you that I think that it is a myth that names like "nUniqueWidgetIterator" actually convey any extra meaningful information on a net basis. That is, there is no evidence that I find convincing that such "meaningful" or "professional" identifiers actually convey more good information (i.e. correct, unambiguous, and readily interpretable information ) than they do bad information. I raise the issue of 'bad' information, because any natural language designator is fraught with subjectivity and ambiguity. Beyond that, who's to say that "nUniqueWidgetIterator" is still a "unique widget iterator" (even if we can agree what that means)? There's no guarantee that this designation has not been rendered obsolete, irrelevant, or even 100% wrong by maintenance coding, or simply by subsequent development. It's better to just stick with "ii" or "jj", since such names make no pretense at communicating anything beyond what's apparent from a reading of the code.



  • @boomzilla said:

    @C-Octothorpe said:
    @boomzilla said:
    @heterodox Chuck Norris said:
    @boomzilla said:
    Oh, well, that's totally different. That dude gets to avoid typing out all of the spaces to make sure is code is indented properly. Just think of how much money you'd save from having to replace keyboards with worn out space bars!
    I do hope you're being facetious. If not, TRWTF is having to hit the Space bar multiple times (or at all) to indent code properly.
    OK, smartypants. How do you indent code?
    He stares it down until it indents itself...

    CNTFY

    True story. No, really, any good IDE (Visual Studio) or text editor (Vim) should automatically indent a new code block. If they do not, I should be able to hit Tab to reach the next indention level (Tab being expanded if the coding style requires a certain number of spaces, of course).

    Hitting Space twelve times in a row just to get the right indention level is a good way to get carpal tunnel. Just my two cents.

    @bridget99 said:

    In my experience, I outperform most other programmers.

    That's what every programmer says. In any case, I hope you're the only one maintaining your code. I agree OP's variable names are ridiculous (I'd use a linked list or an array), and it's fine to dislike Hungarian notation (personally, I use it in loosely-typed languages; in strictly-typed languages, I'd use widgetIterator for your example), but variable names like "ii" are most certainly [i]not[/i] the answer.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @heterodox said:

    I do hope you're being facetious. If not, TRWTF is having to hit the Space bar multiple times (or at all) to indent code properly.
    During the interview for my current position, it was mentioned that they'd gone through many different coding styles and they asked if I could deal with maintaining that without wasting time standardizing the code.

    Anyway, so during my "orientation" (during which I scoured the network for any sort of documentation because everyone else was too busy to tell me anything and there sure as hell wasn't anything prepared) I found one document related to coding style. From 2008. For C#. It mandated 2 spaces as an indent. I'm yet to see anything that actually complies with that standard, thank god.



  • @heterodox said:

    True story. No, really, any good IDE (Visual Studio) or text editor (Vim) should automatically indent a new code block. If they do not, I should be able to hit Tab to reach the next indention level (Tab being expanded if the coding style requires a certain number of spaces, of course).

    I get it. You're just not very dedicated to your craft. It's OK. You gotta put bread on the table somehow.



  • @boomzilla said:

    I get it. You're just not very dedicated to your craft. It's OK. You gotta put bread on the table somehow.

    Me being able to write code faster = my employer being happier = me being well paid.



  • @bridget99 said:

    In my experience, I outperform most other programmers.

    I'm sorry, are you this bridget99? By what metric does "I don't bother pumping messages because fuck the user" make you a better-than-average programmer? In my opinion, it makes you a shit programmer who produces shit and doesn't care that it's shit.

    You're either an ingeniously-subtle troll, or... I think I'll go out on a limb and say it: the worst programmer on this board. The fact that you're so convinced that you're great is the icing on the cake; Dunning–Kruger effect in action!



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @bridget99 said:
    In my experience, I outperform most other programmers.
    I'm sorry, are you this bridget99? By what metric does "I don't bother pumping messages because fuck the user" make you a better-than-average programmer? In my opinion, it makes you a shit programmer who produces shit and doesn't care that it's shit.

    Outperforms most other programmers at producing shit. I don't see why this is hard to follow.



  • I'm going to go out on a limb and say that if you think raw typing speed affects your productivity, you're probably not a good developer.



  • TRWTF is indenting code manually at all.

    Seriously, use the auto-format command of your IDE and move on.



  • @fatbull said:

    TRWTF is indenting code manually at all.

    Seriously, use the auto-format command of your IDE and move on.

    Is there no end to the number of people who just don't care enough about the quality of their work any more? TRWTFs are the standards endorsed by members of this forum!



  • @boomzilla said:

    @fatbull said:

    TRWTF is indenting code manually at all.

    Seriously, use the auto-format command of your IDE and move on.

    Is there no end to the number of people who just don't care enough about the quality of their work any more? TRWTFs are the standards endorsed by members of this forum!

    Err, out of curiosity what IDE do you use?



  • @frits said:

    I'm going to go out on a limb and say that if you think raw typing speed affects your productivity, you're probably not a good developer.
    Basically what I was going to say.

    Also, if you're writing loops within loops where you can't use objectNameIndex or just index, chances are you need to factor out some methods.  And that you're a crap programmer.  I have to deal with the remnants of those types at work.  HERE'S A 1000 LINE METHOD, HAVE FUN!



  • @serguey123 said:

    @boomzilla said:

    @fatbull said:

    TRWTF is indenting code manually at all.

    Seriously, use the auto-format command of your IDE and move on.

    Is there no end to the number of people who just don't care enough about the quality of their work any more? TRWTFs are the standards endorsed by members of this forum!

    Err, out of curiosity what IDE do you use?

    Look, you can blame the tools for your shortcomings all you want, but I will know the truth about your passion for software development.



  • @Sutherlands said:

    Also, if you're writing loops within loops where you can't use objectNameIndex or just index, chances are you need to factor out some methods.  And that you're a crap programmer.  I have to deal with the remnants of those types at work.  HERE'S A 1000 LINE METHOD, HAVE FUN!

    Yeah really.  Didn't they invent LINQ to hide that kind of crap? ;)



  • @boomzilla said:

    @serguey123 said:

    @boomzilla said:

    @fatbull said:

    TRWTF is indenting code manually at all.

    Seriously, use the auto-format command of your IDE and move on.

    Is there no end to the number of people who just don't care enough about the quality of their work any more? TRWTFs are the standards endorsed by members of this forum!

    Err, out of curiosity what IDE do you use?

    Look, you can blame the tools for your shortcomings all you want, but I will know the truth about your passion for software development.

    Don't avoid the question.

    Look when I was doing ASM decades ago, I would agree that manual indentation is a good idea but today?

    Fuck, if you don't like how the auto indenting is done you can also tell the IDE how do you.like it done.  I joked about .Net paradigm in my tags but I also consider it very true, focus on the important stuff.



  • @serguey123 said:

    @boomzilla said:

    @serguey123 said:

    @boomzilla said:

    @fatbull said:

    TRWTF is indenting code manually at all.

    Seriously, use the auto-format command of your IDE and move on.

    Is there no end to the number of people who just don't care enough about the quality of their work any more? TRWTFs are the standards endorsed by members of this forum!

    Err, out of curiosity what IDE do you use?

    Look, you can blame the tools for your shortcomings all you want, but I will know the truth about your passion for software development.

    Don't avoid the question.

    Look when I was doing ASM decades ago, I would agree that manual indentation is a good idea but today?

    Fuck, if you don't like how the auto indenting is done you can also tell the IDE how do you.like it done.  I joked about .Net paradigm in my tags but I also consider it very true, focus on the important stuff.

    Oh, great, "just let the IDE do it." How can you advocate that in this economy?



  • @boomzilla said:

    @serguey123 said:

    @boomzilla said:

    @serguey123 said:

    @boomzilla said:

    @fatbull said:

    TRWTF is indenting code manually at all.

    Seriously, use the auto-format command of your IDE and move on.

    Is there no end to the number of people who just don't care enough about the quality of their work any more? TRWTFs are the standards endorsed by members of this forum!

    Err, out of curiosity what IDE do you use?

    Look, you can blame the tools for your shortcomings all you want, but I will know the truth about your passion for software development.

    Don't avoid the question.

    Look when I was doing ASM decades ago, I would agree that manual indentation is a good idea but today?

    Fuck, if you don't like how the auto indenting is done you can also tell the IDE how do you.like it done.  I joked about .Net paradigm in my tags but I also consider it very true, focus on the important stuff.

    Oh, great, "just let the IDE do it." How can you advocate that in this economy?

    What economy?  Corrupsylvania is doing good according to government propaganda news so as soon as Linux conquers the world (any day now, I tell you) we will own all of you, imperialist pigs! Juche!



  • Well, you can always hire a bunch of interns to replace automatically inserted spaces with hand-crafted spaces, I guess.



  • @fatbull said:

    Well, you can always hire a bunch of interns to replace automatically inserted spaces with hand-crafted spaces, I guess.

    And call it economic stimulus.



  • @bridget99 said:

    Incidentally, all of those supposedly meaningful identifier names really just coalesce into a homogeneous blur in my experience. At least "ii" and "jj" look different... "nIterativeLoopCounter", "nGrandpaPointer", "nSuperGrandpaPointer", etc.

    Of course using "i" as a loop variable instead of "canIHasLoopCounterOMGPleaz" is pretty reasonable. This does not generally apply, though. Less obvious things like say "bool isVisible" aren't more readable by shortening to "v".

     

    @bridget99 said:

    @Xyro said:
    Are you sure your weights are set correctly..?

    No, I am not sure I am setting my weights correctly; in fact, the
    "weights" you speak of probably vary from programmer to programmer (in
    both their perception and in reality). [...] There's no guarantee that this designation has not been rendered
    obsolete, irrelevant, or even 100% wrong by maintenance coding, or
    simply by subsequent development. It's better to just stick with "ii" or
    "jj", since such names make no pretense at communicating anything
    beyond what's apparent from a reading of the code.

    So comments are useless, too? They might get out of date if you're sloppy.
    I'm not sure you get that the point here is the following: You write the code once, but is has to be read much more often. Probably by someone else than you, who doesn't know what your abbreviations mean. Readability is king. If writing is a problem for you, learn to type.

     

    @blakeyrat said:

    I'm sorry, are you this bridget99?
    By what metric does "I don't bother pumping messages because fuck the
    user" make you a better-than-average programmer?

    OMG, I wasted my time replying to this when blakey has just totally owned you. /thread


  • @boomzilla said:

    OK, smartypants. How do you indent code?
     

    Incidentally, I don't hand-craft my spaces every time; I use someone else's carefully produced and maintained spaces. I'm not going to reinvent the wheel, duh. They're open-source spaces, but they're just as good as the paid ones.



  • @bridget99 said:

    @Lorne Kates said:

    @bridget99 said:

    Any design decision that breaks ... "Go to Definition", or "Find All References" is incorrect.
     

    Out of curiosity, what does that?

    If the call upon which I am right-clicking is made using a reference to a base class, then choosing "Go to Definition" takes me to a stupid little base class stub declaration instead of to the actual implementation. That was the basic species of problem to which I was referring.


    So no loosely coupled components or inversion of control for you then? How exactly do you mock and unit test?

     


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