Now THAT's what I call broadband!



  • KPackageKit claims to reach 4GiB/sec download speed

    Remember the unit is Gibibyte, so that's roughly 34.36 Gigabits per second! My connection is advertised as 18000 Kilobits per second which it doesn't ever reach (either due to physical circumstances or, more likely, advertisement tricks). I usually get around 10Mbps download speed.

    (I should also mention that this number only flashed up for a fraction of a second from time to time. So it's probably a statistic started too early, maybe division by zero related.)



  • WAT? They divided by OH SH--

     

     

     



  • @gobes said:

    WAT? They divided by OH SH--

    I was hoping for "really good" compression.



  • What's that "eye of Sauron" / "Lego Technic connector pin" button on the title bar?

    (+1 for dark theme)



  • @Zecc said:

    What's that "eye of Sauron" / "Lego Technic connector pin" button on the title bar?

    (+1 for dark theme)

     

    Prolly a monitor switcher.

     



  •  A while back I ran a recursive wget over a fairly large site which I wanted to be able to refer to offline. Of course, I set a reasonable delay between requests so that it wouldn't flood the server. I'm not sure whether that confused wget, but the last line of output was an estimated download time calculated by taking the total amount of data downloaded and dividing by the time taken to download the last file. It was about as fast as yours - certainly in the GB/sec.



  •  @derula said:

    I should also mention that this number only flashed up for a fraction
    of a second from time to time.
    I get that fairly regularly for the first second or two.

    So it's probably a statistic started too
    early, maybe division by zero related.
    That's what I thought.



  • @derula said:

    KPackageKit claims to reach 4GiB/sec download speed

    Remember the unit is Gibibyte, so that's roughly 34.36 Gigabits per second!

    Now the bad news.  That's almost certainly a 32-bit signed<->unsigned error, and your actual transfer rate is minus one bytes per second.  Your computer is leaking bits!  Unplug it quick before they're all gone!



  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    Maybe the interval size was 1ns and you happened to receive a burst of about 34⅓ bits that nanosecond.



  • If this is coming out of a browser (which I can't tell because I can't read your language), my experience is that most browsers start downloading files before this dialog appears (and sometimes even before you've specified a place to save them). When this dialog shows up the transfer rate calculation mistakenly incorporates what's already been downloaded, and you get a second or two of impossibly high transfer rates until a few more data points even it out.

    Also, frist post ever yay.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @UrzaMTG said:

    (which I can't tell because I can't read your language)

    I can read "Details" just fine.



  • @UrzaMTG said:

    If this is coming out of a browser...

    It appears that the program in question is called KPackageKit, which appears to be a KDE interface to PackageKit, which appears to be a package manager for linux distributions (which one, do not know or care, but it appears to be one).

    @UrzaMTG said:

    Also, frist post ever yay.

    Welcome. Pull up a chair, crack open a tall frosty beverage, and enjoy your stay. Remember, do not feed the trolls err, blakeyrants, and don't forget to be a pedantic dickweed every chance that you can. If you can do that, you'll fit in just fine. :)



  • @dhromed said:

    @Zecc said:

    What's that "eye of Sauron" / "Lego Technic connector pin" button on the title bar?

    (+1 for dark theme)

     

    Prolly a monitor switcher.

    Nope, it's a button to toggle the window's always-on-top state. I use this button very often.



  • @dohpaz42 said:

    @UrzaMTG said:
    If this is coming out of a browser...

    It appears that the program in question is called KPackageKit, which appears to be a KDE interface to PackageKit, which appears to be a package manager for linux distributions (which one, do not know or care, but it appears to be one).

    Almost. But, PackageKit isn't a package manager itself, it is daemon that can talk a number of different package managers in order to provide a unified interface across distros.



  •  TRWTF is gibberbytes.



  • @derula said:

    Almost. But, PackageKit isn't a package manager itself, it is daemon that can talk a number of different package managers in order to provide a unified interface across distros.

    Not pointless enough for me. They should have a PackageKitKit which would be a "daemon" which could talk to multiple different package manager managers to provide a unified interface. Each one using a totally different sound server.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Each one using a totally different sound server.

    Don't worry, [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonon_%28KDE%29]Phonon[/url] can fix that!



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @derula said:
    Almost. But, PackageKit isn't a package manager itself, it is daemon that can talk a number of different package managers in order to provide a unified interface across distros.

    Not pointless enough for me. They should have a PackageKitKit which would be a "daemon" which could talk to multiple different package manager managers to provide a unified interface. Each one using a totally different sound server.

    Next logical step should be that the actual package managers become inaccessible for any other software except PackageKit. And then, the package managers should get a new (generally accessible) feature to remote control PackageKitKit to support legacy applications.



  • I was going to offer you a mug, but then I realized the window is not opaque.



  • @TheCPUWizard said:

    @gobes said:
    WAT? They divided by OH SH--
    I was hoping for "really good" compression.

    I remember back in the Napster days sometimes I got 20KB/s downloads on my 33.6k modem: if that happened I learnt to just stop the transfer: the file was not legitimate.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    They should have a PackageKitKit which would be a "daemon" which could talk to multiple different package manager managers to provide a unified interface interface. Each one using a totally different sound server server.
     

    Piled That On For You.


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