Car repair "specialist" WTF



  • <font size="1">"Because more things make us ask WTF than just code"

    <font size="2">I was recently subject to an unfortunate 'incident' with my brand new car, it was broken into and I suppose the first WTF must be that the thieves stole the bonnet (aka 'hood'). After the initial annoyance/shock/anger laughter just had to prevail. The WTFness didn't however stop there....

    Instruction from my insurance company left me with a choice of 1 (one) bodyshop in my area for the repairs (actually it wasn't in my area, more like 30 miles away). The nearest official dealer for my car was 200 yards away, the location I'd bought and had it insured, but nm.

    The bonnet was removed by smashing the drivers side window, opening the bonnet release and undoing the 4 bolts that held it in place. Any Haynes manual fan will be familiar with the phrase "fitting is the reversal of removal", or not in this case. Fitting a new bonnet apparently consisted of removing the front wings, doors, decals, grill, lights; then spraying various parts including the newly ordered bonnet and reassemble, minus the decals. Removal was a 5 minute job I'm sure, refitting took over a month.

    There was also internal damage to the car, missing sunvisor and headrest and most worryingly the gearstick was bend to one side quite dramatically. I ensured before the car went for repair that I catalogued the damage and ensured I communicated it both verbally and in writing with the car repairer.

    In writing I'd ensured one of my points was "Gearstick and any associated damage", believing that there may be damage to the linkages underneath the vehicle. I was suprised to discover they had managed to replace a perfectly functional gearknob and gater, but somehow 'missed' the fact the gearstick was bent when replacing these parts.

    I suppose at least they were thoughful enough to leave me a spare headrest in the boot of the car, one day I might have a use for it.


    </font></font>



  • @Walrus said:

    <font size="1"><font size="2">Fitting a new bonnet
    apparently consisted of removing the front wings, doors, decals, grill,
    lights; then spraying various parts including the newly ordered bonnet
    and reassemble, minus the decals. Removal was a 5 minute job I'm sure,
    refitting took over a month.</font></font>




    Strangely enough, the convoluted replacement process I can actually
    understand.  It's surprisingly difficult to spray a single panel
    and get a good colour match with the surrounding ones, particularly
    when it's a big panel like a bonnet surrounded by small bits of wing
    etc.  That said, a competent bodyshop should've been able to do a
    blending job rather than spraying whole panels.



    A friend had a very similar theft - opened his (locked) garge to find
    the bonnet and steering column missing.  Apparently, if a second
    hand parts dealer gets a request for parts to repair a frontal impact,
    their teams of roving thiefs have alist of where what vehicles are
    parked somewhere quite and accesable during the day.  Scanner to
    clear the alarm, jimmy bar to open the garage, air-bottle and air tools
    for quick removal of parts - gone in 60 seconds :)



    D




  • bonnet. boot.  lols.  great story!



  • @Walrus said:

    <font size="1"><font size="2">
    Instruction from
    my insurance company left me with a choice of 1 (one) bodyshop in my
    area for the repairs (actually it wasn't in my area, more like 30 miles
    away). The nearest official dealer for my car was 200 yards away, the
    location I'd bought and had it insured, but nm.
    </font></font>


    Since you're speaking in miles, not kilometers, I'm guessing you're in
    America.  I believe it's illegal in many (all?) states for your
    insurance to tell you where to get your repairs.  Try entering
    "insurance auto steering illegal" along with your state into Google.




  • he's in the UK I think.  they still use standard pretty much if I'm not mistaken.



  • @tster said:

    he's in the UK I think.  they still use standard pretty much if I'm not mistaken.


    Indeed I am, and we do.

    The UK is very confusing, we buy petrol in litres, but quote miles per gallon for vehicles. ^_^



  • that's silly.  are you guys trying to switch to metric?



  • @tster said:

    that's silly.  are you guys trying to switch to metric?

    Even better - officially we already have! :-) It's just that there is so much 'legacy' that no-one can be bothered with the expense. Speed limit signs are in miles per hour, not kilometres, but we weigh everything in kilos and measure distances in metres. Except for road distances.

    Don't try to wrap your head around it: it's not worth it. The rule of thumbe seems to be that if it involves motor vehicles then it's Imperial, else Metric.



  • @ithika said:


    Don't try to wrap your head around it: it's not worth it. The rule of thumbe seems to be that if it involves motor vehicles then it's Imperial, else Metric.

    That should be "motor vehicles, beer, or milk" since the latter two both come in pints.



  • @AJR said:

    That should be "motor vehicles, beer, or milk" since the latter two both come in pints.

    And a quick note for American readers: an Imperial pint is 20 oz, not 16 oz like an American pint.



  • @tster said:

    bonnet. boot.  lols.  great story!


    Just brought to mind... a store named "Bonnets & Boots" would carry very different inventory, depending on if it were in the US or the UK.



  • @Iago said:

    And a quick note for American readers: an Imperial pint is 20 oz, not 16 oz like an American pint.


    Let's hope that an Imperial fluid ounce is the same as an American one, or we will be here all night.

    (Seriously though, 16oz? Surely your pint glasses must be tiny? Or do you not have pint glasses? I've only been to the States when I was decidedly under age.)



  • @ithika said:



    (Seriously though, 16oz? Surely your pint glasses must be tiny? Or do you not have pint glasses? I've only been to the States when I was decidedly under age.)


    It's not the size, it's the... oh, who am I kidding. It's the size.

    Most of our beers come in 12 oz servings. There are some variations: 16 oz, 20 oz, 22 oz, 32 oz, or the infamous "40." But by and large, the 12 oz bottle (or can) is king. In a bar or restaurant, you will generally get a 12 oz in a mug, although sometimes you can find larger. Combine that with the weakness of American beers, and you can see why we have to drink so many. For example, here I am considered an alcoholic. In the UK, I would be considered a toddler.

    It should be known, for those who don't, that American malt liquor is a little stronger. Some of these (most?) I would consider just "stronger," not "better."


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