I Loathe TFS



  • So I have the following structure in our TFS server:



    The root QA node is mapped to C:\TFS - QA, with everything else recursively mapped inside (originally mapped by TFS itself). I am trying to add a new folder to the Regression or System Test Scripts so I can add some code in that folder (non-Visual Studio created code), so I right click on "Regression or System Test Scripts" and select the "New Folder" menu item. Here's the result:




    Sooooo it decided to put it in the RDE or Condo folder instead of the folder I told it to. I decide to add the folder in windows explorer, put a code file in it and add it that way. So I left click on Regression or Test Scripts and I see this:




    According to that, it's mapped to C:\TFS - QA\Automated Test Scripts\Regression or System Test Scripts directory. So I right click on that folder and click "Add Items To Folder", and this pops up:



    So this page claims it's not mapped to a destination folder. WTF, ok so I'll add the mapping again. So I click on Map, set the local folder, and get this:



    ...... sigh



  • @KallDrexx said:

    I have the following structure in our team TFS server
    FTFY...



  • It wouldn't surprise me if your workspace definition contains multiple mappings, some of which contradict each other. The only sane way to setup a workspace is by having only 1 mapping for the root of the structure to 1 folder on disk. Nothing else



  • @bjolling said:

    It wouldn't surprise me if your workspace definition contains multiple mappings, some of which contradict each other. The only sane way to setup a workspace is by having only 1 mapping for the root of the structure to 1 folder on disk. Nothing else

    Yes I just went through this myself. My eventual fix was to check in everything I was working on, blow away everything in my local workspace, map the root again, and do a GET. I don't know how it got that way, but I suspect adding the folder had something to do with it. It's probably a repeatable bug, but it's so painful I'm not going to try to cause it on any important boxes. I could try it on the consultant's machine :)



  • We tried TFS for a while last year, and of all the version control systems I've used it's single-handedly the most painful POS ever conceived. About the only positive thing I have to say about is is that it integrates nicely into Visual Studio, but if it didn't I don't think there would be any reason for anyone to use it.

    No merging ever? Awesome, except that also means that only 1 person can ever be editing a file at a time. Sure, you can go ahead and edit a locked file on your local disk, but unless you're the locker, your changes don't exist. It's 2011, no-one needs to be shielded from merging now (and if you do, you can't call yourself a developer).

    We're using Mercurial now, which is a lot less painful and has an integration plugin for Visual Studio. I'd strongly recommend giving it a try, if at all possible.



  • Is TFS something related to that game where they sell stupid hats for real money that serve no purpose whatsoever?



  • @derula said:

    Is TFS something related to that game where they sell stupid hats for real money that serve no purpose whatsoever?

    If said game involves pain, loathing, and a desire to end one's life rather than continue playing, then yes.



  • A few quick comments/observations....

     1) Considering TFS as "just" a Source Control Package is like looking at just the glove box when buying a Sportscar. TFS is a complete ALM (Application LifeCycle Management system, and the value has to be evaluated in that context to have meaning.

     2) A single root mapping is indeed the simplest, but I have very workable systems where the local folder mapping (set up for easy of use) is nearly an inversion of the internal mappng (set up for best management practices including tracking, work items, and security). If you go for something other than a root mapping (only), then be sure to document it well, as it is indeed easy to make a mistake.

     3) The original issue with the folder being created one level down, is something that I have not seen, nor can I reproduce it. If possible, please contact me with a repro...



  • @The_Assimilator said:

    No merging ever? Awesome, except that also means that only 1 person can ever be editing a file at a time. Sure, you can go ahead and edit a locked file on your local disk, but unless you're the locker, your changes don't exist. It's 2011, no-one needs to be shielded from merging now (and if you do, you can't call yourself a developer).

    Are you sure you are talking about TFS? Branching, merging, shared check-outs, automatic/manual conflict resolution etc have been in TFS since the beginning. Even SourceSafe 2005 supports these things.

    What I guess that happened is that your TFS was implemented by an administrator that disabled all new features of TFS to make it behave like an early SourceSafe. If I werer to reconfigure your Mercurial to disallow these features, how would you like it then?



  • Has anyone tried installing TFS before? It's the worst experience I've ever had with any software PERIOD!! There are soo many dependencies and so many dead-ends during the install process where you'd get so far in the install, then it'll tell you something is missing, and you'd have to start the install process all over again. And a lot of times the deads ends would amount to some obscure configuration you'd need to apply to Windows (usually around creating accounts with extremely specific permissions), that you'd have to Google, then the config would vary depending on which version of Windows you were running (and even which Service Pack). Just terrible, horrible horrible, horrible! My mum would have more success installing a Linux distro than most software devs would have with installing TFS.

    This was with TFS 2005 and 2008, not sure if they've improved the situation with 2010. We ended up switching to Subversion, there's an excellent plugin for Visual Studio that gives you Tortoise/SVN integration called VisuaSVN.



  • @Sunday Ironfoot said:

    This was with TFS 2005 and 2008, .

    Yes, 2005 was painful, and 2008 was not much better, this was largely due to the fact the the programs TFS depends on were also being released at around the same time, and a coordinated distribution was problematic [granted, that doesn't help the iperson doing the installs]. The process was clearly documented, and if you RTM, things went smooth 90% of the time.

     2010 is a completely different experience. A solid wizard, set a few options and away it runs, doing everything necessary (well, the OS does have to be there) unless you specifically select options telling it not to.



  • @TheCPUWizard said:

     2010 is a completely different experience. A solid wizard, set a few options and away it runs, doing everything necessary (well, the OS does have to be there) unless you specifically select options telling it not to.
    It's not perfect yet but installing TFS2010 was quite easy. TFS 2010: Install and Configure in 30 Minutes or Less


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